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Abstract:
Short review of an early anti-Baha'i book by a Christian missionary.
Notes:
This document is online in a variety of formats at archive.org.

Bahaism and Its Claims, by S. G. Wilson:
Review

by C. M. Buchanan

published in Moslem World, 6, pages 325-326
London: 1916-01

1. Text

Bahaism and its Claims: A Study of the Religions promulgated by Baha Ullah and Abdul Baha.
By Samuel G. Wilson, M.A., D.D. New York: Fleming H. Revell Co. 1915. $1.50 net.

Bahaism is a revolt from the fold of Islam which in recent years has been bidding vigorously for the support of Occidental minds. Many of its principles are culled from the Christian religion which it insidiously seeks to supplant. What this Oriental cult is, what it stands for, and what it aims at, is told in a volume which forms a notable addition to the history of comparative religions.

The book is full of interest to every lover of "pure religion and undefiled." It gives the history of the Bahai movement from its origin in such a clear vivid manner that many will rejoice that the fog surrounding this new religion has been cleared away. That Bahaism is an out-growth of Babism and not identical with it is plainly shown so that no confusion need remain in any mind. The claims of the new cult are clearly set forth and fairly and squarely dealt with upon their own merits. One thing especially — the immoral practice of "taqiya" or religious dissimulation taught by the Bahai is explained so fully that those who have work among these people can now understand how it is possible for them to say one hour, "We are Moslems," and the next, "We are Christians." It explains why they seem always to be acting a double part. A man may deny at any time that he is a Bahai and yet not hurt his conscience, for Baha said, "If your heart is right with me, nothing matters."

Dr. Wilson shows us in unmistakable terms that the claims of this religion to unite all other religions into a "renewal of religion" or into a universal religion by the "bands of love," are ludicrously false. He gives us a page or two of their choice curses and marvellously strong abusive language, showing that they have not improved upon the religion which teaches, "Love your enemies," nor is their conception of the spirit of brotherly love a very clear one.

The principal followers of Abdul Baha, we learn, are Persians and American women! While the author does not alarm us about the rapid spread of this religion, yet he says, "Christian Missions have come face to face with Bahaism as a new and aggressive force," and he closes the book with the question, "Is it not full time that Christian people and churches should cease to give countenance to this system which is an enemy of the cross of Christ and which has already deceived several thousands of our fellow Christians?"

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