Step toward a world currency brought forward by China

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brettz9
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Step toward a world currency brought forward by China

Postby brettz9 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 11:42 pm

The New York Times has an article on China urging a new money reserve to replace the dollar, controlled by the IMF. Such an eventuality has been described by scholars as being a potential prelude to a world currency, an occurrence foretold in the Baha'i Writings. Earlier Germany and I believe France similarly urged for greater global financial oversight.

What a wonder to behold all of these developments taking place on such a regular basis, all born out of the developments of the 20th century as foretold by 'Abdu'l-Baha...

Perhaps such crises as these today may also lead to a reevaluation of the role of military spending (not even a zero sum game), just as the benefits of free trade have led nations to willingly accept impositions on their economic sovereignty...

Brett

onepence~2
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Re: Step toward a world currency brought forward by China

Postby onepence~2 » Tue Mar 24, 2009 2:10 pm

yes ...

Prophecy being fulfilled ...

it would have way be interesting to look at ... and discuss ...

our World as being Prophecy fulfilled

interesting times

Ian Mayes
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Re: Step toward a world currency brought forward by China

Postby Ian Mayes » Tue Mar 24, 2009 4:42 pm

Yes.. Similarly related, I noticed that President Obama has written an Op-Ed piece that was published around the world today calling for greater global economic cooperation among the different countries of the world - http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/03/24/ ... index.html

brettz9
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Re: Step toward a world currency brought forward by China

Postby brettz9 » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:36 am

China's call seems it may end up becoming, at this point, only a historic milestone, since this article indicates "Both the United States and the European Union brushed off the idea."

Yet, as with the historic decision by the International Criminal Court to make an arrest warrant for a sitting president (whatever the final result or lack of compliance with the order), it is the milestones to which we must look for comfort, in the painfully slow process toward world unity. Shoghi Effendi spoke about the unprecedented decision of the League of Nations voting to impose sanctions on Fascist Italy in its aggression against Ethiopia, which even though, as also foreseen even by 'Abdu'l-Baha before him, the League did fail, as we can tell now by the growing significance of the role of international collective security, peace-keepers, etc., this was not some random fluke, but a historic precedent upon which future generations would build:

That no less than fifty nations of the world, all members of the League of Nations, should have, after mature deliberation, recognized and been led to pronounce their verdict against an act of aggression which in their judgment has been deliberately committed by one of their fellow-members, one of the foremost Powers of Europe; that they should have, for the most part, agreed to impose collectively sanctions on the condemned aggressor, and should have succeeded in carrying out, to a very great measure, their decision, is no doubt an event without parallel in human history. For the first time in the history of humanity the system of collective security, foreshadowed by Bahá'u'lláh and explained by `Abdu'l-Bahá, has been seriously envisaged, discussed and tested. For the first time in history it has been officially recognized and publicly stated that for this system of collective security to be effectively established strength and elasticity are both essential--strength involving the use of an adequate force to ensure the efficacy of the proposed system, and elasticity to enable the machinery that has been devised to meet the legitimate needs and aspirations of its aggrieved upholders. For the first time in human history tentative efforts have been exerted by the nations of the world to assume collective responsibility, and to supplement their verbal pledges by actual preparation for collective action. And again, for the first time in history, a movement of public opinion has manifested itself in support of the verdict which the leaders and representatives of nations have pronounced, and for securing collective action in pursuance of such a decision.

...

There can be no doubt whatever that what has already been accomplished, significant and unexampled though it is in the history of mankind, still immeasurably falls short of the essential requirements of the system which these words foreshadow. The League of Nations, its opponents will observe, still lacks the universality which is the prerequisite of abiding success in the efficacious settlement of international disputes. The United States of America, its begetter, has repudiated it, and is still holding aloof, while Germany and Japan, who ranked among its most powerful supporters, have abandoned its cause and withdrawn from its membership. The decisions arrived at and the action thus far taken, others will maintain, should be regarded as no more than a magnificent gesture, rather than a conclusive evidence of international solidarity. Still others may contend that though such a verdict has been pronounced, and such pledges been given, collective action must, in the end, fail in its ultimate purpose, and that the League itself will perish and be submerged by the flood of tribulations destined to overtake the whole race. Be that as it may, the significance of the steps already taken cannot be ignored. Whatever the present status of the League or the outcome of its historic verdict, whatever the trials and reverses which, in the immediate future, it may have to face and sustain, the fact must be recognized that so important a decision marks one of the most distinctive milestones on the long and arduous road that must lead it to its goal, the stage at which the oneness of the whole body of nations will be made the ruling principle of international life.

(Shoghi Effendi, World Order of Baha'u'llah, pp. 191, 193)


best wishes,
Brett


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