Yesterday people were buying up supplies of olive oil

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onepence~2
Posts: 221
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 1:17 am

Yesterday people were buying up supplies of olive oil

Postby onepence~2 » Sat Oct 04, 2008 6:36 pm

Iceland is on the brink of collapse. Inflation and interest rates are raging upwards. The krona, Iceland's currency, is in freefall and is rated just above those of Zimbabwe and Turkmenistan.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/oc ... editcrunch

Yesterday people were buying up supplies of olive oil and pasta after a supermarket spokesman announced on Friday night that they had no means of paying the foreign currency advances needed to import more foodstuffs.

BritishBahai
Posts: 250
Joined: Sat May 17, 2008 1:21 pm
Location: UK

Re: Yesterday people were buying up supplies of olive oil

Postby BritishBahai » Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:10 pm

Wow. Madness.

I guess they should buy seeds aswell (to plant their own fruit etc). But then again I dont know if thats possible (considering Iceland is a really cold country)
"I have desired only what Thou didst desire, and love only what Thou dost love"

onepence~2
Posts: 221
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 1:17 am

Re: Yesterday people were buying up supplies of olive oil

Postby onepence~2 » Mon Oct 13, 2008 11:37 pm

BritishBahai wrote:Wow. Madness.

I guess they should buy seeds aswell (to plant their own fruit etc). But then again I dont know if thats possible (considering Iceland is a really cold country)


hmmm ...

after careful consideration ...

we bought seeds for $20 usd here in central fl usa ...

not for us ... mind you ... but for our children ...

our reasoning ... very cheap insurance ... and

we must give / have hope for our children ...

we think that , if need be , planting seeds along fence lines
will give some assurance to our kids that they will still be able to eat ...

scary though for iceland ..

Icelandic Shoppers Splurge as Currency Woes Reduce Food Imports

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid= ... refer=home

Bonus, a nationwide chain, has stock at its warehouse for about two weeks. After that, the shelves will start emptying unless it can get access to foreign currency, the 22-year-old manager said, standing in a walk-in fridge filled with meat products, among the few goods on sale produced locally.

Iceland's foreign currency market has seized up ...


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