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Search for tag "American"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1910 8 Jan The Persian-American Educational Society is inaugurated in Washington DC. [BFA2:XVII; 355–8]
  • Its primary purpose is to assist the Tarbíyat School in Iran. [BFA2:357]
Washington DC; United States; Iran Persian-American Educational Society; Tarbiyat School; Bahai organizations
1918 (in the year) Shoghi Effendi finishes his education in Arts and Sciences at the American University at Beirut. [DH148; GBF9]
  • He receives a Bachelor of Arts degree. [GBF:9]
  • He serves as `Abdu'l-Bahá's secretary for two years before resuming his education in England. [DH148; GBF9; PP26-7]
  • For a picture of Shoghi Effendi at this time see BW13:131, GBF50-1 and PP88-9.
Beirut; Lebanon Shoghi Effendi, Life of; American University at Beirut
1927 Abu'l-Qásim Faizi, a 19-year-old student who had attended the Tarbiyát School in Tehran but now enrolled at the American University at Beirut visits Haifa to meet Shoghi Effendi. Like Hasan Balyuzi before him, he is immediately possessed by a great desire to serve him. [SETPE1p146-7] Haifa; Tihran; Iran; Beirut; Lebanon Abul-Qasim Faizi; Tarbiyat School; American University at Beirut; Shoghi Effendi, Life of
1938 to 1955 The fourth Trustee of the Huqúqu'lláh was Jináb-i-Valíyu'lláh Varqá, the third son of Varqá the martyr. He was born in Tabriz and after the death of his father and brother he was raised by his grandmother, a fanatical Muslim. At the age of 16 his uncle removed him from the home and taught him the Faith. He attended the American University at Beirut and spent summers with 'Abdu'l-Bahá and accompanied the Master to America and served as His interpreter. He returned to Iran where he served on local and national assemblies and was made a Trustee of the Huqúqu'lláh in 1938 at a time when the observance of the law spread throughout Iran. [Message from the Universal House of Justice dated 25 March, 1985]

He was elevated to a Hand of the Cause of God in 1951 and passed away in Tubingen, Germany in 1955 while taking a treatment for an illness. [BW13p831-834]

Tubingen; Germany; Tabriz; Iran; Beirut; Lebanon; Akka Huququllah; Huququllah, Trustees of; Valiyullah Varqa; Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Appointments; Hands of the Cause, Births and deaths; Births and deaths; Hands of the Cause, Activities; Varqa; American University at Beirut
1962 22 May The first Athabascan Indian north of the Arctic Circle to become a Bahá’í, Charley Roberts, enrols. [BW15:455] Canada First Bahais by country or area; Native Americans
1983 21 - 23 Nov A brief entitled The Future of Canada: A Bahá’í Perspective is presented to The Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects of Canada on behalf of the Canadian Bahá’í Community through the National Spiritual Assembly in Saskatoon. [The Future of Canada: A Bahá’í Perspective] Saskatoon; Canada Social action; Ethics; Economics; Consultation; Agriculture; Women; Native Americans; Elderly; Education

from the main catalogue

  1. `Abdu'l-Bahá's 1912 Howard University Speech: A Civil War Discourse for Interracial Emancipation, by Christopher Buck and Nahzy Abadi Buck (2012). Presentation at Grand Canyon Bahá'í Conference on Abdu'l-Bahá and the Black Intelligentsia, especially W. E. B. Du Bois; his speech to the NAACP; and reproductions of many newspaper clippings covering his visit to Washington, DC. [about]
  2. African Americans in the United States, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Comments about what public role might be played by the Baha'i Faith in America to ameliorate the difficulties faced by African-American males. [about]
  3. Alain Locke: Baha'i Philosopher, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). Biography of one of the important African American intellectuals and his impact on American thought and culture. Includes two letters written by or on behalf of Shoghi Effendi. [about]
  4. Alain Locke, by Christopher Buck, in American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, Supplement XIV (2004). [about]
  5. Alain Locke: 'Race Amity' and the Bahá'í Faith, by Christopher Buck (2007). Presentation in slide format about the "First Black Rhodes Scholar." [about]
  6. Alain Locke, by Christopher Buck, in Pop Culture Universe: Icons Idols Ideas (2013). [about]
  7. Alain Locke and Cultural Pluralism, by Christopher Buck, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought (2004). [about]
  8. Alain Locke: Faith and Philosophy, by Christopher Buck: Review, by Derik Smith, in World Order, 38:3 (2008). [about]
  9. Alain Locke: Race Leader, Social Philosopher, Baha'i Pluralist: includes Alain Locke in his Own Words: Three Essays and a poem, by Christopher Buck and Alain Locke, in World Order, 36:3 (2005). Article by Buck, poem "The Moon Maiden" and three essays by Locke introduced by Buck: "The Gospel for the Twentieth Century," "Peace between Black and White in the United States," and "Five Phases of Democracy: Farewell Address at Talladega College." [about]
  10. Alain Locke: Race Leader, Social Philosopher, Bahá'í Pluralist: 94th Annual Commemoration of ‘Abdu'l-Baha's 1912 Visit to Howard University, by Christopher Buck (2006). Available both as audio and PDF, and includes press release. [about]
  11. All is One: Becoming Indigenous and Bahai in Global North America, by Chelsea Horton (2013). Native-American identity, conversion, and community, as viewed through the lens of the Baha'i Faith. For some, converting to the Baha'i Faith accompanied a voyage of self-discovery toward indigenous identity. Link to thesis (offsite). [about]
  12. American Indians and the Bahá'í Faith: Ten-Part Comprehensive Bibliography (2017). An extensive bibliography about references to Native Americans in Baha’i sacred writings, in writings by Baha’i authors, in Baha’i periodicals, and in other Baha’i media. [about]
  13. Bahá'í Universalism and Native Prophets, by Christopher Buck, in Reason and Revelation: Studies in the Babi and Bahá'í Religions, 13 (2002). Explores the possibility of including other great religious figures in the Baha'i category of "Manifestations of God" using the Iroquois prophet Deganawida as an example. [about]
  14. Baha'u'llah's Tablet to Badi'u'llah: Parallels to Bahá'í Teachings by Native American Messengers of God, by Donald Addison and Christopher Buck, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Compilation of writings from Native American traditions and analogous texts from Baha'i scripture. [about]
  15. Beyond Red Power: The Alternative Activism of Dorothy Maquabeak Francis, by Chelsea Horton, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 14:3-4 (2004). Aboriginal activism of the 1960s-1970s, which promoted native spirituality and culture, fostered cross-cultural understanding, but now "Red Power" must encompass both the grassroots and the spiritual realms. [about]
  16. Black Roses in Canada's Mosaic: Four Decades of Black History, by Will C. van den Hoonaard and Lynn Echevarria-Howe (1994). Survey of African-Americans in Canada, their activities in the Baha'i community, and statistical information. [about]
  17. Champions of Oneness: Louis Gregory and His Shining Circle, by Janet Ruhe-Schoen: Review, by Lex Musta, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies (2016). [about]
  18. Claiming legitimacy: Prophecy narratives from northern aboriginal women, by Julie Cruikshank, in The American Indian Quarterly (1994). Includes a discussion of Angela Sidney, a Tagish elder who was very active in the Baha'i Faith, and who believed that there is not necessary any conflict between Anglicanism, Baha'i, and indigenous shamanism. [about]
  19. Comparison of the Seven Valleys and the American Indian Peace Shield, by Nina Bailey (1999). Comparison study between the spiritual teachings of the ancient Native American Indian Peace Shield and the spiritual journey described by Bahá'u'lláh in The Seven Valleys [about]
  20. Concepts of Spirituality in The Works of Robert Houle and Otto Rogers with Special Consideration to Images of the Land , by Nooshfar B. Afnan (2000). The attitude of native Canadians toward the land and the prairies, as expressed through the work of two artists, their spiritual iconography, and Baha'i teachings regarding nature. [about]
  21. Diné Becoming Baha'i: Through the Lens of Ancient Prophecies, by Linda S. Covey (2011). Some Diné (Navajo) convert to the Baha'i Faith because it fulfills their ancient prophecies, its institutions provide autonomy and empower the Diné people, and Baha'i values of cultural diversity allow Diné to practice their traditional ways. [about]
  22. Encouragement, Challenges, Healing, and Progress: The Bahá'í Faith in Indigenous Communities, by Alfred Kahn, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). On the challenges of community-building among Indigenous people, written from the perspective of a childhood spent among Baha'i pioneers on Native American land, and on reconciling traditional views with global Baha'i teachings. [about]
  23. God & Apple Pie: Religious Myths and Visions of America, by Christopher Buck (2015). Introduction by J. Gordon Melton (Professor of American Religious History, Baylor University), and two sample chapters: "Native American Myths and Visions of America" and "Black Muslim Myths and Visions of America." [about]
  24. Indian Nations and National Spiritual Assemblies, by Universal House of Justice (2002). American Indian nations are not fully sovereign and thus do not have their own National Spiritual Assemblies. [about]
  25. Interracial "Bahá'í Movement" and the Black Intelligentsia, The: The Case of W. E. B. Du Bois, by Christopher Buck, in Journal of Religious History, 36:4 (2012). Du Bois’s encounters with the Baha’i religion from 1910 to 1953, his connection to the New York Baha’i community, and discussion of segregated Baha’i meetings in Tennessee in 1937. [about]
  26. Many Messengers of God, A Native American Perspective: Deganawidah The Peacemaker, by Paula Bidwell (2011). Collection and analysis of proofs from the Baha'i Writings about prophets from indigenous cultures. Includes illustrated slide-show presentation of the paper. [about]
  27. Message to the Indian and Eskimo Bahá'ís of the Western Hemisphere, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1969). An overview of the Baha'i Faith, written to the native Inuit and First Nations peoples of North America. [about]
  28. Messengers of God in North America, Revisited: An Exegesis of 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Tablet to Amír Khán, by Christopher Buck and Donald Addison, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). The indigenous peoples of the Americas have their own claim to wisdom tradition, which derive from Messengers of God to First Nations. This principle is anchored in the Tablet to Amír Khán Áhan. [about]
  29. Native Bahá'ís: Bios of past and contemporary Bahá'ís of native ancestry (2014). Links to photographs and information from the 1910s to the present about Native Baha'is, both from the United States, Canada, Hawaii, and Alaska, and indigenous Baha'is elsewhere around the world. [about]
  30. Native Messengers of God in Canada?: A Test Case for Bahá'í Universalism, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 6 (1996). Explores the possibility of including other great religious figures in the Baha'i category of "Manifestations of God" using the Iroquois prophet Deganawida as an example. [about]
  31. Native Messengers of God in Canada? A test case for Bahá'í universalism, by Christopher Buck: Commentary, by William P. Collins, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). [about]
  32. Navajo Tradition, The: Transition to the Bahá'í Faith, by Linda S. Covey, in Images, imaginations, and beyond: proceedings of the 8th Native American Symposium, November 2009, ed. Mark B. Spencer (2010). Examines three reasons behind the conversion of some Navajo to Baha'i in the early 1960s: fulfillment of prophecy, cultural empowerment and autonomy, and protection of traditional practices. [about]
  33. Necessary History, A: Teaching On and Off The Reservations, by Linda S. Covey, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). On the early Bahá’í literature directed toward Native Americans; history of Bahá’í conversion activities with Indigenous populations; and the work conducted by the Central States Regional American Indian Teaching. [about]
  34. North American Indian Prophecies, by Lee Brown (1986). Talked delivered at the 1986 Continental Indigenous Council, Tanana Valley Fairgrounds, Fairbanks, Alaska. [about]
  35. Numinous Land, The: Examples of sacred geometry and geopiety in formalist and landscape paintings of the prairies, by Kim Ennis (2012). Includes many references to the Baha'i Faith and its influence on contemporary artists. Link to thesis (offsite). [about]
  36. Public Discourse on Race: Abdu'l-Bahá's 1912 Howard University Speech, by Christopher Buck (2012). Presentation at Louhelen Bahá’í School on ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and the black intelligentsia, his views of the Civil War and the Emancipation Proclamation, and his message to African Americans and the "Whites." [about]
  37. Return to Tyendinaga: The Story of Jim and Melba Loft, Bahá'í Pioneers: Review, by Lee Brown (2013). History of the first Aboriginal believers in Canada, who moved from Michigan to pioneer in the Tyendinaga First Nation in Ontario in 1948. [about]
  38. Robert Hayden, by Christopher Buck, in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature, Vol. 2, ed. Jay Parini (2004). The first African American poet-laureate of the United States (as Library of Congress "Consultant in Poetry"). [about]
  39. Robert Hayden's “American Journal”: A Multidimensional Analysis, by Christopher Buck, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2 (2008). [about]
  40. Servants of the Glory: A Chronicle of Forty Years of Pioneering, by Adrienne Morgan and Dempsey Morgan (2017). Memoirs of a black couple from the United States who lived and spread the Bahá’í Faith in across parts of east Asia and Africa in the 1950s-1980s. Text by Dempsey Morgan, poems by Adrienne Morgan. Link to document offsite. [about]
  41. Tabla de 'Abdu'l-Bahá a Amír Khan, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2007). [about]
  42. Tablet to Amir Khan and Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Three letters about Abdu'l-Baha'is Tablet to Amír Khán; one letter about the Tablet of the Holy Mariner, the "Call of God," and Native American Prophets; short note from David Ruhe about Deganawida. [about]
  43. Universities as the Gatekeepers of the Intellectual Property of Indigenous People's Medical Knowledge, by Chris Jones Kavelin, in Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, Volume 37 (2008). While this article is inspired by Baha'i principles, it has no mention of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
 
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