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Search for tag "Anis"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1850. 8 Jul The Báb, divested of His turban and sash, is taken on foot to the barracks in Tabríz. Mírzá Muhammad-‘Alíy-i-Zunúzí, Anís, throws himself at the feet of the Báb and asks to go with Him. [B153; DB507]

  • That night the Báb asks that one of His companions kill Him, rather than let Him die at the hands of His enemies. Anís offers to do this but is restrained by the others. The Báb promises that Anís will be martyred with Him. [B154–5; DB507–8]
Tabríz; Iran; Persia Bab; turban; sash; barracks; Mirza Muhammad-‘Aliy-i-Zunuzi; Anis; martyr
1850. 9 Jul Martyrdom of the Báb

In the morning the Báb is taken to the homes of the leading clerics to obtain the death-warrants. [B155; DB508]

  • The warrants are already prepared. [B155–6; DB510]
  • Anís's stepfather tries to persuade him to change his mind. Anís's young son is also brought to ‘soften his heart' but Anís's resolve remains unshaken. [B156–7; DB509–10]

At noon the Báb and Anís are suspended on a wall in the square in front of the citadel of Tabríz. They are shot by 750 soldiers in three ranks of 250 men. [B157; DB512]

  • When the smoke clears the Báb is gone and Anís is standing, unharmed, under the nail from which they were suspended. The Báb, also unhurt, is found back in his cell completing His dictation to His secretary. [B157–8; DB512–13]
  • See BBD200–1 and DB510–12, 514 for the story of Sám Khán, the Christian colonel of the Armenian regiment which was ordered to execute the Báb.

The Báb and Anís are suspended a second time. A new regiment, the Násirí, has been found to undertake the execution. After the volley, the bodies of the Báb and Anís are shattered. [B158; DB514]

  • See BBR77–82 for Western accounts of the event.
  • The face of the Báb is untouched. [B158]
  • At the moment the shots are fired a gale sweeps the city, stirring up so much dust that the city remains dark from noon until night. [B158; DB515]
  • See CH239 and DH197 for the story of the phenomenon of the two sunsets.

    At night, the bodies are thrown onto the edge of the moat surrounding the city. Soldiers stand guard over them and, nearby; two Bábís, feigning madness, keep vigil. [B159; TN27]

Tabríz; Iran; Persia Martyrdom; Bab; Anis; Sam Khan; Christian; colonel; Armenian
1888 Nabíl begins his chronicle, The Dawn-Breakers: Nabíl's Narrative of the Early Days of the Bahá'í Revelation. [DBXXXVII]

Jamál Effendi, accompanied by Hájí Faraju'lláh-i-Tafrishí, embarks on a long journey to the East visiting Burma, Java, Siam, Singapore, Kashmir, Tibet, Yarqand, Khuqand in Chinese Turkistan, and Afghanistan. [EB123–4; PH22]

Burma; Java; Siam; Singapore; Kashmir; Tibet; Yarqand; Khuqand; Chinese Turkistan; Afghanistan Nabíl; Jamál Effendi; Hájí Faraju'lláh-i-Tafrishí; Dawn-Breakers: Nabíl's Narrative
1953 Oct Muhammad Mustafá Sulaymán, an Egyptian, arrives in Spanish Sahara (Western Sahara) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. BW13:456]
  • For the story of his life see BW18:768–71.
Spanish Sahara (Western Sahara) Muhammad Mustafa Sulayman; Knight of Baha’u’llah
1953 11 Oct Fawzí Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín and his wife, Bahíyyih ‘Alí Sa‘di’d-Dín, and their sons Kamál and Sharíf arrive in Tetuán from Egypt and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Spanish Morocco. [BW13:456]
  • For the story of Fawzí Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín’s life see BW16:544–6.
Tetuán; Spanish Morocco Fawzí Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín; Bahíyyih ‘Alí Sa‘di’d-Dín; Kamál Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín; Sharíf Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín; Knight of Bahá’u’lláh
1953 24 Oct Luella McKay, John and Erleta Fleming, and Alyce Janssen arrive in Spanish Morocco and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Spanish Morocco Luella McKay; John Fleming; Erleta Fleming; Alyce Janssen; Knight of Baha’u’llah
1954 May Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle) arrives in Bata, the capital of Rio Muni, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for a second time, this time for Spanish Guinea. [BW13:456] Bata; Rio Muni; Spanish Guinea Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle); Knight of Baha’u‘llah
1954 17 May The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Elise Lynelle (then Schreiber) in Bata, Spanish Guinea, now Equatorial Guinea. [BWNS330] Bata; Spanish Guinea; Equatorial Guinea Knight; Elise Lynelle; Schreiber
1955 The first person to become a Bahá’í in Spanish Sahara, ‘Abdu’l-Salam Salím Al-Sbintí, enrols. Spanish Sahara ‘Abdu’l-Salam Salim Al-Sbinti
1972 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Afghanistan is formed with its seat in Kabul. [BW15:243]
  • For picture see BW15:151.
Kabul; Afghanistan NSA
1979 The National Spiritual Assembly of Afghanistan is disbanded owing to persecution of the Bahá’ís and the political instability of the country. Afghanistan religious persecution; NSA
1993. 6 Jan The Universal House of Justice announces the appointment of the International Panel of Spanish Translations of Bahá'í Literature. The panel initially consisted of three competent and experienced believers: Mr. Nabil Perdu of Spain, Mr. Conrad Popp of Chile, and Mrs. Migdalia Diez of Puerto Rico. This group was made responsible for producing authorized Spanish versions of the Bahá’í Writings suitable for all the Spanish-speaking Bahá’ís of the world. [Message from the Universal House of Justice] BWC Spanish translation; Nabil Perdu; Conrad Popp; Migdalia Diez
2007 24 May The passing of Hadi Rahmani-Shirazi in the United Kingdom.
  • pioneered to Afghanistan at the Guardian's behest
  • served on the National Spiritual Assembly and the Auxiliary Board in the Cradle of the Faith
  • served as the executive director of the Nawnahalan Company
  • among first appointed to institution of the Counsellors created by the Universal House of Justice in June 1968
  • relocated to the United Kingdom in the early 1980s
  • contributed greatly to the development of the Institution of Huququ'llah through his services as a Deputy. [UK BAHA'I NEWS EMAIL SERVICE message from the National Spiritual Assembly nsa@bahai.org.uk 24 May 2007]
United Kingdom; Afghanistan Hadi Rahmani-Shirazi; pioneer; Guardian; NSA; Auxiliary Board; Nawnahalan Company; Counsellor; Huququ'llah; UHJ; In Memoriam

from the main catalogue

  1. Bahá'í Approach to Cosmopolitan Ideas in International Relations, The, by Nalinie N. Mooten (2005). Link to document offsite. [about]
  2. Bahá'í Faith in India, The: A Developmental Stage Approach, by William Garlington, in Occasional Papers in Shaykhi, Babi and Bahá'í Studies, 2 (1997). [about]
  3. Bahá'í Faith in Malwa, The: A Study of a Contemporary Religious Movement, by William Garlington (1975). A broad overview of Baha'i history in general and in India in particular. Examination of present-day activities, sociological frameworks of village life, and development of local Baha'i administrative orders. [about]
  4. Baha'u'llah as Zoroastrian saviour, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Examines the Baha'i view of Zoroastrianism to understand tensions between scholarship and "messiahship" and topics such as proof texts and prophecy. [about]
  5. Buddha, Krishna, Zoroaster and Related Subjects, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 1 (1991). A compilation on the status of Buddha, Krishna, Zoroaster and other figures. [about]
  6. Celestial Fire: Bahá'u'lláh as the Messianic Theophany of the Divine Fire in Zoroastrianism, by Farshid Kazemi, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). Heat is used as a symbol of the dynamic nature of motion and existence, and in a tablet to the Zoroastrians, Baha'u'llah says that fire is a symbol of the Primal Will personified in the Manifestations. This paper explores such symbolism in the Gathas. [about]
  7. Concept of the Manifestation of God in Chinese Symbolism: An Inter-civilizational Hermeneutic Study, by Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). Seemingly incompatible symbols can point to a common underlying meaning, connecting worldviews and perspectives often considered incommensurable. There are elements of the Chinese tradition that resonate deeply with the Bahá’í concept of Manifestation. [about]
  8. Development of the Bahá'í Faith in Malwa, The: 1941-1974, by William Garlington, in Occasional Papers in Shaykhi, Babi and Bahá'í Studies, 3:1 (1999). A socio-cultural examination of Bahá'í mass teaching as experienced in Central India. [about]
  9. Explanation of a Zoroastrian Prophecy: Length of the "Bahá'í Cycle", by Karl Weaver (2017). Review of certain concepts in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, ancient astrology, and modern astronomical findings to shed light on Abdu'l-Baha's interpretation of a prophecy by Zoroaster about the sun being brought to a standstill. [about]
  10. Fasting among Zoroastrians, Manicheans, and Bahais, by Jamsheed K. Choksy, in Encyclopaedia Iranica, Volume 9 (1999). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  11. Five Questions: Loss of Voting Rights, Mani, Magi, Five-Pointed Star, Joseph Smith, by Universal House of Justice, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 4:3-4:4 (1991). Responses to various questions. Closes with quotations on Confucianism and Genesis. [about]
  12. From Adam to Bahá'u'lláh: The Idea of a Chain of Prophecy, by Zaid Lundberg, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
  13. Future of Confucianism, The, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The history of Confucianism, its teachings, a critique of its place in the modern world, its future, and its survival into the 21st century. [about]
  14. Gnostic Apocalypse and Islam, by Todd Lawson: Review, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 18 (2012). [about]
  15. Hindu Concept of God, The: Unity in Diversity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The fundamental unity behind Hindu concepts of God and those found in the Semitic traditions, and the principle of unity in diversity, allow Hindu and Baha'i beliefs to come together and further their common goal of uniting the world's religions. [about]
  16. Jamál Effendi and the early history of the Bahá'í Faith in South Asia, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). Includes maps on Jamal Effendi's journeys in India, and journeys in Southeast Asia. [about]
  17. Messianic Expectations in Nineteenth Century Christian and Islamic Communities, by Ahang Rabbani (2006). The phenomenon of messianism and its manifestations in early-modern American Christianity and in Iranian Islam. [about]
  18. Procrustes' Bed: The Insufficiency of Secular Humanism, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). Secular humanism’s inability to accommodate the universal presence of religion in human nature undermines its claim to be a viable world-view for mankind and diminishes its internal coherence. [about]
  19. Tabernacle of Unity, The: Bahá'u'lláh's Responses To Mánikchi Sáhib, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
  20. Tablet to Mirza Abu'l-Fadl Concerning the Questions of Manakji Limji Hataria: Baha'u'llah on Hinduism and Zoroastrianism, by Bahá'u'lláh (1995). Introduction to, article about, and translation of the Tablet to Maneckji. [about]
  21. Tablet to the Zoroastrians, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
  22. Time and the Containment of Evil in Zoroastrianism, by Susan Maneck (1997). Basic beliefs of Zoroastrianism, the concept of time in Zoroastrianism, and Zoroastrianism in a Baha'i context. [about]
  23. Women and Religious Change: A case study in the colonial migrant experience, by Miriam Dixson, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). The story of Margaret Dixson, and one woman's growth from Anglicanism, via numerology and astrology, to commitment to the world ideals of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  24. Zoroaster: The Prophet of Ancient Iran and His Book, the Zend Avesta, by Ali-Kuli Khan (1945). [about]
  25. Zoroaster: Baha'u'llah's Ancestor, by Darius Shahrokh, in Windows to the Past (1992). Overview of Zoroastrianism, its place in the history of revelation, and its writings. [about]
  26. Zoroaster, Date of, by Universal House of Justice (1979). Clarifications re the dates and bio information Baha'i texts give for the prophet Zoroaster. [about]
  27. Zoroastrianism, Reference to, in All Things Made New, by Universal House of Justice (1999). A reference to the Zoroastrian text Dinkird, or "Acts of the Religion" (dín-kird) in John Ferraby's All Things Made New, and on the authenticity of the Zoroastrian scriptures. [about]
 
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