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from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1817 Shaykh Ahmad travels to Persia and visits Shíráz and Tihrán. He is in Tihrán when Bahá'u'lláh is born. [DB13] Shiraz; Tihran; Iran Shaykh Ahmad-i-Ahsai; Shaykhism; Bahaullah, Birth of; Bahaullah, Life of
1817. 12 Nov Birth of Mírzá Husayn `Alíy-i-Núrí (Bahá'u'lláh).
  • He is of royal Persian blood, a descendant of Zoroaster and the Sásáníyán kings of Persia through Yazdigird III, the last king of that dynasty. Through His mother He is a descendant of Abraham through Katurah and Jesse. [BW8:874; GPB94; RB1:305]
  • He is born in Tihrán. His father is Mírzá `Abbás whose ancestral home is Tákur in the province of Núr. His father is also known as Mírzá Buzurg in royal circles. [BKG13; RB1:7]
  • His mother is Khadíjih Khánum. [BBD127; BBRSM57–8]
  • He is born at dawn. [LOG353]
  • For biblical reference see LOG378.
  • RB1:304 for extracts from Shoghi Effendi re: His station.
  • BBD39, GPB157–8 for a condensed history.
  • See GPB93-99 for the significance of Bahá'u'lláh's station.
Tehran; Nur; Iran Bahaullah, Birth of; Bahaullah, Life of; Twin Holy days; Holy days; Mirza Buzurg; Khadijih Khanum; - Basic timeline; Births and deaths BIC Statement on Bahá'u'lláh; Bahá'u'lláh: The Word Made Flesh
1823. c. 1823 Bahá'u'lláh's father dreams that his son is swimming in a sea with multitudes of fish clinging to the strands of His hair. He relates this dream to a soothsayer, who prophesies that Bahá'u'lláh will achieve supremacy over the world. [DB199–20] Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Family of; Mirza Buzurg; Dreams; Fishes; Sea
1831. c. 1831 Birth of Mírzá Yahyá (Subh-i-Azal), half brother of Bahá'u'lláh. Iran Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Births and deaths; Bahaullah, Family of
1831 29 Jul Birth of Nabíl-i-A`zam, Muhammad-i-Zarandí, Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh. Nabil-i-Azam; Apostles of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
1835 Birth of Mírzá Áqá Ján-i-Kashání (Khadimu'lláh), Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh and His amanuensis. Mirza Aqa Jan; Apostles of Bahaullah; amanuensis
1835 Oct Marriage of Mírzá Husayn-`Alí to Ásíyih Khánum. [BKG23; RB1:382]
  • She was the daughter of a nobleman Mirza Isma’il-l-Vazie from Yalrud. [CoB117, BKG23, RoB1p382, BPP44, SoG6]
Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Wives of; Navvab (Asiyih Khanum)
1844. 7 Feb Birth of Shaykh Kázim-i-Samandarí, Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh, in Qazvín. Qazvin; Iran Shaykh Kazim-i-Samandari; Apostles of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
1844. 23 May The birth of `Abdu'l-Bahá in a rented house near the Shimrán Gate in Tihrán. He was born at midnight. [AB9, SoG3-4]
  • He is known as `Abbás Effendi outside the Bahá'í community.
  • Bahá'u'lláh gives Him the titles Ghusn-i-A`zam (the Most Great Branch), Sirru'lláh (Mystery of God) and Áqá (the Master). [BBD2, 19, 87, 89]
  • Sarkár-i-Áqá (the Honourable Master) is a title of `Abdu'l-Bahá. [BBD201]
  • He Himself chose the title `Abdu'l-Bahá (Servant of Bahá) after the passing of Bahá'u'lláh. [BBD2]
Tihran; Iran Abdul-Baha, Life of; Bahaullah, Life of; Bab, Declaration of
1844 Jul - Aug The intention of the Báb is to introduce the new Revelation slowly so as not to cause estrangement. He instructe them to spread out and heach His Faith and to this end He assigned each one a special task, most often to their own native provinces. [BBRSM14–16, 36; SWB119, BBR2p36, DB92–4; MH82–6; SBBH1:19]
  • To Mullá Husayn He had given the task of delivering a Tablet to Bahá'u'lláh in Tihrán and going to the court of the Sháh to apprise him of the Báb's cause. Mullá Husayn is not able to gain access to the Sháh. [B48–57; BBRSM15 BKG32–3; CH22–3; DB85-87, 97; MH90–2, 102]
  • Mullá Husayn carries to Tihrán a Tablet revealed by the Báb for Muhammad Sháh. This is the first of a number of unsuccessful attempts to enlist his aid. [BBRSM20–1; MH102; SWB13]
  • Note: MH118-119 and DB127-128 indicate that Mullá Husayn had been in Tehran "between the months of Jámádí and Rajab". The first day of Jámádí, 1260 corresponds to 18 June, and the last day of Rajab to 15 August, 1844.
  • See RB2:303, `The Báb … sent Tablets to only two monarchs of His day — Muhammad Sháh of Persia and Sultán `Abdu'l-Majíd of Turkey.'
  • From Shiraz he journeys north to Isfahán where Mullá Ja`far, the sifter of wheat, is the first to embrace the Cause of the Báb in that city. Mullá Husayn then travels to Káshán, about 130 miles from Isfahán. He then goes to Qum, another 100 miles from Káshán. After Qum he goes to Tihrán. [MH98–101, DB99]
  • See B53–6; DB104–7, MH104–110 for the delivery of the Báb's Tablet to Bahá'u'lláh. Mullá Husayn does not meet Bahá'u'lláh on this occasion.
  • On receiving the Tablet of the Báb, Bahá'u'lláh accepts His Cause. He immediately journeys to Mázindarán, His native province, to promote the Cause of the Báb. He returns after the death of the Shah in 1948 [BKG39–40; BW8:782; DB109; TN35, SoB6, BPP45, 48, SoG4]
  • Mullá Husayn leaves for Khurásán, as he had been instructed, winning supporters for the Báb's Cause while there he writes to the Báb regarding these new believers and Bahá'u'lláh's immediate response to the Báb's Revelation. [B56, DB128–9, MH118]
  • See MH121–2 for a discussion of the speed of Mullá Husayn's journey before the letter was dispatched to the Báb. It assumes that Mullá Husayn departed after The Báb met with all the Letters of the Living (date not before 2 July, 1844.) In fact both Mullá Husayn and Mullá 'Alíy-Bastámí had been dispatched before this meeting. [DB85-86, 92, HotD46] .
Iran; Turkey; Kashan; Isfahan; Tihran; Mazindaran; Khurasan; Qum Bab, Life of; Bab, Writings of; Letters of the Living; Mulla Husayn; Bahaullah, Life of; Tablet to Bahaullah; Shahs; Mulla Jafar (sifter of wheat); Muhammad Shah; Sultan Abdul-Majid; First believers
1844 30 Sep The Báb receives the letter from Mullá Husayn giving Him details of his journey and meeting with Bahá'u'lláh and others he had contacted.
  • Nabíl indicates that the Báb received the letter on 9 October (26 Ramadan) and that it was a deciding factor in His decision to undertake the pilgrimage. [DB126–7, 129]
  • Balyuzi says soon after the Báb received the letter, `in the month of September' He left Shíráz'. [B57]
  • GPB8-9 says He received the letter in the month of Sha'bán, 1260 (16 August to 13 September, 1844).
  • See MH119 where the author speculates that if the letter arrived on 16 Ramadan (29 September) and the Báb departed from the port of Búshihr on the 19th of Ramadan (2 October, 1844), He had to have been in Búshihr when He received the letter.
Iran Bab, Life of; Mulla Husayn; Bahaullah, Life of; Pilgrimage
1847. 1 Apr The Báb receives a letter and gifts from Bahá'u'lláh in Tihrán delivered to His Hands by Mulla Muhammad-Mihdiy-i-Kandi. The letter cheers His heart, which has been despondent since His arrest and departure from Shíráz. [B120; DB227; GPB678] Tihran; Shiraz; Iran Bab, Life of; Gifts; Bahaullah, Writings of
1848 The birth of Mírzá Mihdí, `the Purest Branch', the son of Bahá'u'lláh and Navváb. [BBD155]

Tihran; Iran Mirza Mihdi (Purest Branch); Births and deaths; Bahaullah, Family of
1848. c. 26 Jun - 17 Jul The Conference of Badasht

Bahá'u'lláh, who hosts and directs the event, rents three gardens, one for Quddús, another for Táhirih and the third for Himself. [B168; GPB31, 68; MF200]

The conference coincides with the removal of the Báb to Tabríz for interrogation in July.

It is held near the village of Sháhrúd in Semnan province. [BBRSM23; DB292]

  • `The primary purpose of that gathering was to implement the revelation of the Bayán by a sudden, a complete and dramatic break with the past — with its order, its ecclesiasticism, its traditions, and ceremonials. The subsidiary purpose of the conference was to consider the means of emancipating the Báb from His cruel confinement in Chihríq.' [BBRSM23; BKG43; DB297–8; GPB31, 157]
  • B167 says that the Bábís did not come to Badasht to make plans to rescue the Báb. It is attended by 81 believers and lasts 22 days. [BKG43–4, 46; DB292–3; GPB312]
  • Each day Bahá'u'lláh reveals a Tablet, and on each believer He confers a new name. Each day an Islamic law is abrogated. Henceforth, when the Báb was addressing the believers, He used the new name that Bahá'u'lláh had bestowed upon them. [DB293; GPB32]
  • See BKG44–5, DB293 and MF201 for the story of the central event, Táhirih's confrontation with Quddús and removal of her veil.
  • Also see B167–9; BBD31–2; BBRSM46; BKG43–7; DB292–8; RB2:353.
Badasht; Tabriz; Shahrud; Chihriq; Iran; Persia Conference at Badasht; Bahaullah, Life of; Quddus; Tahirih; Bab, Life of; Bayan; - Basic timeline
1848. c. 17 Jul The Bábís leave Badasht for Mázindarán. They are attacked by a mob of more than 500 outside the village of Níyálá. [B170–1; BKG46–7; BW18:380; DB298; GPB68]
  • Bahá'u'lláh travels to Núr with Táhirih. He entrusts her into the care of Shaykh Abú-Turáb-i-Ishtahárdí, to be taken to a place of safety. [BKG48; DB299]
  • Bahá'u'lláh travels to Núr `in easy stages'. By September He is in Bandar-Jaz. [BKG48]
Badasht; Mazindaran; Niyala; Nur; Bandar-Jaz; Iran Badasht; Attacks; Bahaullah, Life of; Tahirih; Shaykh Abu-Turab-i-Ishtahardi
1948 Sep Bahá'u'lláh is in Bandar-Jaz. An edict comes from Muhammad Sháh ordering His arrest.
  • The Russian agent at Bandar-Jaz offers Him passage on a Russian ship at anchor there but He refuses. [BKG50] Birth of Hájí Mírzá Hasan, Adíb, Hand of the Cause and Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh, in Táliqán.
Bandar-Jaz; Taliqan; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Muhammad Shah; Russian agent; Russia; Adib (Haji Mirza Hasan Talaqani); Births and deaths
1849 Bahá'u'lláh marries his second wife, Fátimih Khánum Mahd-i-‘Ulyá (1828–1904), His cousin, the daughter of Malik-Nisá Khánum (Mírzá Buzurg's sister) and Mírzá Karím-i-Namadsáb.
  • Note: According to one source, she was married to the famous cleric Mírzá Muhammad Taqí ‘Allámi-yi-Núrí and widowed before Bahá'u'lláh married her.
Iran Bahaullah, Life of ; Bahaullah, Wives of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum); Malik-Nisa Khanum; Mirza Buzurg; Mirza Karim-i-Namadsab
1850. Jun c. Mírzá Taqí Khán determines to execute the Báb to halt the progress of His religion. On his orders the Báb is taken from Chihríq to Tabríz. [B152; BBR76–7; GPB51]

  • His guard takes Him on a circuitous, much longer route through Urúmíyyih where His presence is noted by American missionaries. [B152; BBR73, 76]
  • Forty days before the Báb was to leave Chihríq He collected all His documents, Tablets, pen cases, seals and His agate rings, and put them in a coffer. He entrusted it to Mullá Báqir, one of the Letters of the Living, and instructed him to deliver it to His secretary. The secretary is instructed to proceed to Tihrán to deliver the box to ‘Jináb-i-Bahá', that is, Bahá'u'lláh. [B151–2; DB504–5; TN25–6]
  • When the box is opened they find a Tablet in the form of a pentacle with 500 verses consisting of derivatives of the word ‘Bahá'. [B151–2; DB504–5; TN25–6]
Chihriq; Tabriz; Urumiyyih; Tihran; Iran Mirza Taqi Khan; Bab, Life of; Missionaries; Mulla Muhammad Baqir-i Tabrizi; Letters of the Living; Bahaullah, Life of; Bab, Writings of; Relics; Greatest Name
1851 Jun c. Mírzá Taqí Khán meets with Bahá'u'lláh and tells Him that it would be advisable for Bahá'u'lláh to leave Tihrán temporarily. [BKG66; DB591]

A few days later, Bahá'u'lláh leaves Tihrán for Karbalá on pilgrimage. [BKG66; DB587]

Tihran; Iran; Karbala; Iraq Mirza Taqi Khan; Bahaullah, Life of
1852. 15 Aug Attempt on the life of the Sháh. [BBR128; BBRSM:30; BKG74–5; DB599; ESW20; GPB62; TN2930]

  • See BKG74–5 for circumstances of the event.
  • See BKG76 for the fate of the perpetrators.
  • See BBR128–46 for reporting of the event in the West.
  • Ja‘far-Qulí Khán writes immediately to Bahá'u'lláh telling Him of the event and that the mother of the Sháh is denouncing Bahá'u'lláh as the ‘would-be murderer'. Ja‘far-Qulí Khán offers to hide Bahá'u'lláh. [BKG77; DB602]
Iran Nasirid-Din Shah, Attempt on; Nasirid-Din Shah, Mother of; Shahs; History (general); Jafar-Quli Khan; Bahaullah, Life of
1852. 16 Aug Bahá'u'lláh rides out towards the headquarters of the imperial army. He stops at Zargandih at the home of Mírzá Majíd Khán-i-Áhí, secretary to the Russian legation. [BKG77; DB603]

  • Bahá'u'lláh is invited to remain in this home. [DB603]
  • The Sháh is informed of Bahá'u'lláh's arrival and sends an officer to the legation to demand the delivery of Bahá'u'lláh into his hands. The Russian minister, Prince Dolgorukov, refuses and suggests that Bahá'u'lláh be sent to the home of the Grand Vizier. [BKG77; DB603]
  • Bahá'u'lláh is arrested. [BKG77; DB603]
Zargandih; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Mirza Majid Khan-i-Ahi; Russian; Shahs; Prince Dolgorukov; Grand Vizier; Nasirid-Din Shah, Attempt on
1852 Aug-Dec Bahá'u'lláh's imprisonment in the Síyáh-Chál.

  • See AB10–11, BBD211–12, BKG79–83, CH41–2, DB631–3, GPB109 and RB1:9 for a description of the prison and the conditions suffered by the prisoners.
  • No food or drink is given to Bahá'u'lláh for three days and nights. [DB608]
  • Bahá'u'lláh remained in the prison for four months. [CH41; ESW20, 77; GPB104; TN31]
  • See CH42–3 for the effect of Bahá'u'lláh's imprisonment on His wife and children. Friends and and even family were afraid to be associated with His immediate family. During this period Mírzá Músá helped the family surreptitiously and Mírzá Yúsif, who was married to Bahá'u'lláh's cousin, a Russian citizen and a friend of the Russian Consul, was less afraid of repercussions for his support of them.
  • They were also assisted by Isfandíyár, the family's black servant that had been emancipated in 1839 on the order of Bahá'u'lláh. This man's life was in great danger. At one time they had 150 policemen looking for him but he managed to evade capture. They thought that if they questioned (tortured) Isfandíyár he would reveal Bahá'u'lláh's nefarious plots. [SoW Vol IX April 28, 1918 p38-39]
  • ‘Abdu'l-Bahá, as a child of eight, is attacked in the street of Tihrán. [DB616]
  • See AB11–12, RB1:9 for ‘Abdu'l-Bahá's account of His visit to His father.
  • Bahá'u'lláh's properties are plundered. [CH41; RB1:11]
  • See BBD4–5 and BKG94–8 for the story of ‘Abdu'l-Vahháb-i-Shírází who was martyred while being held in the Síyáh-Chál.
  • See BBD190, 200 and ESW77 about the two chains with which Bahá'u'lláh was burdened while in the Síyáh-Chál. Five other Bábís were chained to Him day and night. [CH41]
  • Bahá'u'lláh had some 30 or 40 companions. [BBIC:6, CH41]
  • An attempt was made to poison Him. The attempt failed but His health was impaired for years following. [BBIC:6; BKG99–100, GPB72]
Bahá'u'lláh's half-brother Mírzá Yahyá flees to Tákur and goes into hiding. He eventually goes to Baghdád. [BKG90, 107, CH41]
Tihran; Takur; Iran; Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Attempts on; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Prison; Abdul-Baha, Life of; Abdul-Vahhab-i-Shirazi; Martyrs; Poison; Chains; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); - Basic timeline
1852 Oct Bahá'u'lláh has a vision of the Maiden, who announces to Him that He is the Manifestation of God for this Age. [BBD142–3, 212; BKG823 ESW11–12, 21 GPB101–2; KAN62]

  • This experience compares to the episode of Moses and the Burning Bush, Zoroaster and the Seven Visions, Buddha under the Bodhi tree, the descent of the Dove upon Jesus and the voice of Gabriel commanding Muhammad to ‘cry in the name of thy Lord'. [GPB93, 101]
  • The Báb repeatedly gave the year nine as the date of the appearance of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. The Declaration of the Báb took place in AH 1260; year nine was therefore AH 1269, which began in the middle of October when Bahá'u'lláh had been in prison for about two months. [CB46–7]
  • Subsequently in His Writings Bahá’u’lláh declared that He was the "Promised One" of all religions, fulfilling the messianic prophecies found in world religions. He stated that being several messiahs converging one person were the spiritual, rather than material, fulfilment of the messianic and eschatological prophecies found in the literature of the major religions. His eschatological claims constitute six distinctive messianic identifications: from Judaism, the incarnation of the "Everlasting Father" from the Yuletide prophecy of Isaiah 9:6, the "Lord of Hosts"; from Christianity, the "Spirit of Truth" or Comforter predicted by Jesus in His farewell discourse of John 14-17 and the return of Christ "in the glory of the Father"; from Zoroastrianism, the return of Shah Bahram Varjavand, a Zoroastrian messiah predicted in various late Pahlavi texts; from Shi'a Islam the return of the Third Imam, Imam Husayn; from Sunni Islam, the return of Jesus, Isa; and from the Bábí religion, He whom God shall make manifest.

    While Bahá’u’lláh did not explicitly state Himself to be either the Hindu or Buddhist messiah, He did so in principle through His writings. Later, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated that Bahá’u’lláh was the Kalki avatar, who in the classical Hindu Vaishnavas tradition, is the tenth and final avatar (great incarnation) of Vishnu who will come to end The Age of Darkness and Destruction. Bahá’ís also believe that Bahá’u’lláh is the fulfilment of the prophecy of appearance of the Maitreya Buddha, who is a future Buddha who will eventually appear on Earth, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure Dharma. Bahá’ís believe that the prophecy that Maitreya will usher in a new society of tolerance and love has been fulfilled by Bahá’u’lláh's teachings on world peace. [Bahaikipedia]

Tihran; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Visions; Maid of Heaven; Angels; Year nine; - Basic timeline; Interfaith dialogue
1852 Dec Bahá'u'lláh is released from the Síyáh-Chál.

  • This was owing to: the efforts of the Russian Minister Prince Dolgorukov; the public confession of the would-be assassin; the testimony of competent tribunals; the efforts of Bahá'u'lláh's own kinsmen; and the sacrifices of those followers imprisoned with Him. [GPB104–5]
  • See CH43–4 for the role of the Russian Consul in securing His release. He invoking his full power as an envoy of Russia, called out the Sháh and his court for their barbaric behaviour.
  • See BKG101–2, CH44 and DB647–8 for the physical condition of Bahá'u'lláh on release.
  • See BKG101, DB648–9 and GPB105 for the words of Bahá'u'lláh to Mírzá Áqá Khán on His release.
  • The Russian minister invited Bahá'u'lláh to go to Russia but Bahá'u'lláh chose instead to go to Iraq. It may be that He refused the offer because He knew that acceptance of such help would have been misrepresented as having political implications. [BBIC:8; DB650]
Iran; Persia; Iraq Bahaullah, Life of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Nasirid-Din Shah, Attempt on; Russia; Minister; Prince Dolgorukov; Mirza Áqa Khan
1853. 12 Jan Bahá'u'lláh and His family depart for Baghdád after a one month respite in the home of his half-brother Mírzá Ridá-Qulí. During the three-month journey Bahá'u'lláh is accompanied by His wife Navváb, (Who was six weeks from giving birth upon departure.) His eldest son ‘Abdu'l-Bahá (9), Bahíyyih Khánum (7) and two of His brothers, Mírzá Músá and Mírzá Muhammad-Qulí. Mírzá Mihdí (2), was very delicate was left behind with the grandmother of Àsíyih Khánum. They are escorted by an officer of the Persian imperial bodyguard and an official representing the Russian legation. [BKG102–5; GPB108]
  • CH44–5 says the family had ten days after Bahá'u'lláh's release to prepare for the journey to Iraq.
  • ‘Never had the fortunes of the Faith proclaimed by the Báb sunk to a lower ebb'. [DB651]
  • This exile compares to the migration of Muhammad, the exodus of Moses and the banishment of Abraham. [GPB107–8]
  • See BKG104 and GPB108–9 for conditions on the journey.
  • Bahá'u'lláh's black servant, Isfandíyár, who had managed to evade capture during this dark period, after he had paid all the debts to various merchants, went to Mazandaran where he was engaged by the Governor. Years later when his master made a pilgrimage to Iraq Isfandíyár met Bahá'u'lláh and stated his preference to return to His service. Bahá'u'lláh said that he owed his master a debt of gratitude and could not leave his employ without his permission. It was not granted and Isfandíyár returned to Mazandaran and stayed with the Governor until his passing. [SoW IX 28 April, 1918 p38-39]
  • Also see A Gift of Love Offered to the Greatest Holy Leaf (Gloria Faizi, 1982), by Hand of the Cause Abu'l-Qasim Faizi, which includes a brief summary of the character of Isfandiyar and his services to the Holy Family on pages 14-16.
Íran; Persia; Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Mirza Rida-Quli; Navvab (Asiyih Khanum); Abdul-Baha, Life of; Bahiyyih Khanum (Greatest Holy Leaf); Mirza Musa; Mirza Muhammad-Quli; Russia; Isfandiyar
1853. 21 Mar Bahá'u'lláh and His companions arrive in Khániqayn, just across the Iraqi border, where they rest in a beautiful orchard to observe Naw-Rúz. [BKG105]
  • The Governor of Tehran had sent soldiers with the party of exiles to the frontier where they were met by Turkish soldiers who escorted them to Baghdád. [Ch47]
Khaniqayn; Iraq Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Naw-Ruz
1853. 8 Apr Bahá'u'lláh and His family arrive in Baghdád. [BBR177; BKG106; GPB109; TN38]
  • See BBR177–83 for conditions in Baghdád during this period.
  • Shoghi Effendi describes this as being the lowest period of the faith of the Báb. [DB651, GPB113-114]
  • Shortly after the family's arrival in Baghdád Navváb gives birth to a son. [CB71; CH51–2]
Baghdad; Iraq Life of Bahaullah; Navvab (Asiyih Khanum)
1853 or 1854 Birth of Mírzá Muhammad-‘Alí, first son of Bahá'u'lláh and His second wife, Mahd-i-‘Ulyá. [CB 125]

  • He was born in the first year of Bahá'u'lláh's arrival in Baghdád. CB125]

    Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Lawh-i Kullu't-ta‘ám (Tablet of All Food). [BRSM:62; BKG112]

  • The revelation of this Tablet points up Mírzá Yahyá's lack of ability. [BKG 112]
Baghdad; Iraq Mirza Muhammad-Ali; Bahaullah, Wives of; Bahaullah, Family of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum); Lawh Kullut-Taam (Tablet of All Food); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Firsts, Other
1854 10 Apr - 1856 19 Mar Bahá'u'lláh suddenly leaves Baghdád and goes to Kurdistán. [BKG115; DB585; GPB120]

  • Before He left, Bahá'u'lláh asked His family to look after Mírzá Yahyá during His absence. [CB70–1; CH50–1]
Bahá'u'lláh lives for some time as a dervish in a cave on the mountain of Sar-Galú. He takes the name Darvísh Muhammad-i-Írání to conceal His true identity. [BBD214–15; BBRSM:60–1; BKG116–19; GPB120–1; TN38–9]

  • This action compares to Moses' going out to the desert of Sinai, to Buddha's retreat to the wilds of India, to Christ's walk in the wilderness and to Muhammad's withdrawal to the hills of Arabia. [BKG114]
  • Áqá Abu'l-Qásim-i-Hamadání was His only companion. Áqá Abu'l-Qásim was killed on a journey to collect money and provisions. [BKG116–17]
  • "It was this period of voluntary seclusion, following shortly after the execution of the Báb in 1850, which bequeathed to history irrevocable proof that Bahá'u'lláh and not His half-brother, Subhi-Ezel, was in reality the one celebrated by the Báb and for whom the Bábí Movement was the spiritual preparation. Tor by this act of voluntary retirement, Bahá'u'lláh gave Sebhi-Ezel unhampered opportunity to exercise the spiritual leadhership over the Bábís which the latter claimed as his right. The result, however, demonstrated Subhi-Ezel's utter incapacity to maintain unity among the Bábís, inspire them with faith and confidence sufficient to meet their many difficulties and guide them along lines of true future progress. Nother but the return of Bahá'u'lláh could re-quicken the flames of their ardour or supply them with the more universal principles of conduct and faith required to transform the Bábí Movement into a world religion." [BW2Surveyp33]
  • It was during this time that Bahá'u'lláh revealed the poem Qasídiyi-i-‘Izz-i-Varqá'íyyih. It was composed of 2,000 couplets but Bahá'u'lláh allowed only 127 to be preserved. [BBD215; BKG118; GPB123]
  • See BKG114, GPB117–19 and K1250 for reasons for Bahá'u'lláh's retirement.
  • Before and during His absence no fewer than 25 people claimed to be the One promised by the Báb. [BBRSM29, 59; EB269; GPB125]
  • See BKG115–19 and GPB120 for Bahá'u'lláh's activities while in Kurdistán.
  • See KI248–51 for Bahá'u'lláh's own account of the episode.
  • See BKG119–22 and GPB124–6 for the condition of the Bábí community in Baghdád during this period.
  • The son born to Navváb shortly after the family's arrival in Baghdád became ill and died during Bahá'u'lláh's absence. [CB71; CH51–2]
  • See SBBR2:1–28 for Bahá'u'lláh's contact with Súfís.
  • BW16:528 for an account of Daoud Toeg, who visited the caves of Sar-Galú and photographed them.
Kurdistan; Baghdad Bahaullah, Life of; Dervishes; Sulaymaniyyih; Sar-Galu; Aqa Abul-Qasim-i-Hamadani; Poetry; Qasidiyi-i-Izz-i-Varqaiyyih (Ode of the Dove); Navvab (Asiyih Khanum); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Sufism; Daoud Toeg; Caves; Interfaith dialogue
1856. c. 1856 – 1857 Birth of Samadíyyih Khánum, first daughter of Bahá'u'lláh and His second wife, Mahd-i-‘Ulyá. Samadiyyih Khanum; Bahaullah, Family of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum)
1856 – 1863 It is in this period that Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Seven Valleys in response to a request from a Súfí, Shaykh Muhyi'd-Dín, the Qádí of Khániqayn, whom He may have met in Kurdistán. In it Bahá'u'lláh describes the stages of the mystical life. [BBD206 BBRSM:64; SA150]

  • For details of the composition and content of the Seven Valleys see SA1507.
Baghdad; Iraq; Kurdistan Bahaullah, Writings of; Haft Vadi (Seven Valleys); Sufism; Shaykh Muhyid-Din; Qadi Khaniqayn; - Basic timeline
1856 19 Mar Bahá'u'lláh returns from Sulaymáníyyih, Kurdistán.

"He Himself has described the situation which then confronted Him:

We found no more than a handful of souls, faint and dispirited, nay utterly lost and dead. The Cause of God had ceased to be on any one's lips, nor was any heart receptive to its message. [GPB125]

  • From this time Bahá'u'lláh started to educate the believers in the principles of the Faith. [GPB127–8; TN39]
Baghdad; Iraq; Sulaymaniyyih; Kurdistan Bahaullah, Life of; Sulaymaniyyih
1856 Mar During His absence Mírzá Musá rents a house in the Karkh district in the west of the city. The house is large, two or three stories, and is made of simple mud brick with a surrounding central courtyard. At some point before His departure on the 22nd of April, 1863, the house is purchased. He later names it "The Most Great House" and designates it a place of pilgrimage. It is also referred to as the "Throne of His Glory", and the "Lamp of Salvation between earth and heaven". [CEBF66]
  • After His departure the House was held in the names of various custodians and allowed to fall into disrepair. [CEBF66]
Baghdad; Iraq House of Bahaullah (Baghdad); Life of Bahaullah
1858 Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Hidden Words (Kalimát-i-Maknúnih), originally designated ‘The Hidden Words of Fátimih', while walking along the banks of the Tigris. [BBD102; BKG159; GPB138–40] Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Writings of; Kalimat-i-Maknunih (Hidden Words); Fatimih; Tigris; Rivers - Basic timeline
1861. c. 1861 ‘Abdu'l-Bahá writes the Sharh-i Kuntu Kanzan Makhfiyan, the commentary on the Islamic tradition ‘I was a Hidden Treasure …' for ‘Alí Shawkat Páshá. He is reported to be 17 years old at the time. [AB14]

Hájí Ákhúnd (Mullá ‘Alí-Akbar-i-Shahmírzádí), Hand of the Cause, becomes a Bábí in Mashhad. [EB266]

Mullá Sádiq-i-Muqaddas-i-Khurásání (Ismu'láhu'l-Asdaq), a Bábí and father of Ibn Asdaq, meets Bahá'u'lláh in Baghdád and becomes a follower. [BKG18]

Baghdad; Iraq; Mashhad; Iran Abdul-Baha, Writings and talks of; Sharh-i Kuntu Kanzan Makhfiyan (Commentary on the tradition of the Hidden Treasure); Commentaries; Hadith; Islam; Hidden Treasure (Hadith); Ali Shawkat Pasha; Haji Akhund (Mulla Ali-Akbar-i-Shahmirzadi); Hands of the Cause; Ismullahul-Asdaq (Mulla Sadiq Khurasani); Ibn-i-Asdaq (Mirza Ali-Muhammad); Bahaullah, Life of
1861 -1892 Bahá'u'lláh reveals The Kitáb-i-Íqán, ‘a comprehensive exposition of the nature and purpose of religion'. [BBD134, 162; BKG159; BBD134; BBRSM64–5; GPB138–9; RB1:158]

  • The Tablet is revealed in answer to four questions put to Bahá'u'lláh by Hájí Mírzá Siyyid Muhammad, a maternal uncle of the Báb. [BBD134, 162; BKG163–5; RB1:158]
  • It is revealed in the course of two days and two nights. [BBD 134; BKG165; GPB238; RB1:158]
  • The original manuscript, in the handwriting of ‘Abdu'l-Bahá, is in the Bahá'í International Archives. [BKG165; RB1:159]
  • It is probably the first of Bahá'u'lláh's writings to appear in print. [BKG165; EB121]
  • For a discussion of the circumstances of its revelation, its content and major themes see RB1:153–97.
Baghdad; Iraq; Tihran; Tehran; Iran; Persia Bahaullah, Writings of; Kitab-i-Iqan (Book of Certitude); Muhammad, Haji Mirza Siyyid; - Basic timeline
1862. c. 1862 Bahá'u'lláh sends a ring and cashmere shawl to His niece, Shahr-Bánú, the daughter of Mírzá Muhammad-Hasan, in Tihrán to ask for her hand in marriage to ‘Abdu'l-Bahá. Shahr-Bánú's uncle, acting in place of her dead father, refuses to let her go to Iraq. [BKG342–3] Tihran; Iran; Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Life of; Rings; Shawls; Gifts; Shahr-Banu; Mirza Muhammad-Hasan (King of Martyrs); King of Martyrs and Beloved of Martyrs; Abdul-Baha, Life of
1862. c. Mar - Jun Birth of Sádhijíyyih, second daughter of Bahá'u'lláh and His second wife, Mahd-i-‘Ulyá. Baghdad; Iraq Sadhijiyyih; Bahaullah, Family of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum)
1863. c. Jan 1863 The governor of Baghdád, Námiq Páshá, receives the first of ‘five successive commands' from ‘Alí Páshá, the Grand Vizier of Turkey, to transfer Bahá'u'lláh to Constantinople. This order is ignored by the governor, who is sympathetic to Bahá'u'lláh. In the next three months, four more orders will be received and similarly ignored before the governor is compelled to comply. [BKG154; GPB131] Baghdad; Iraq; Istanbul; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Governors; Namiq Pasha; Grand Viziers; Ali Pasha
1863. 26 Mar Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Tablet of the Holy Mariner on the fifth day of Naw-Rúz. [BKG154; GPB147; RB1:228; SA163]

  • The Tablet is recited by Mírzá Áqá Ján. [RB1:228]
  • See GPB147 and RB1:228 for the effect on those present.
  • See RB1:228–44 and SA163–5 for descriptions of the Tablet and analyses of its content.
  • Immediately after it is chanted Bahá'u'lláh orders the tents to be folded and everyone to return to the city. [GBP147; RB1:228–9; SA163]
  • The party has not yet left when a messenger arrives from Námiq Páshá summoning Bahá'u'lláh to the governorate the next day to receive the invitation to go to Constantinople. [RB1:229; SA163]
Mazra‘iy-i-Vashshash; Iraq; Constantinople; Istanbul; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Lawh-i-Mallahul-Quds (Tablet of the Holy Mariner); Naw-Ruz; Mirza Áqa Jan; Namiq Pasha
1863. 27 Mar Bahá'u'lláh meets the deputy governor in a mosque opposite the Government House where the Farmán which had been sent by the Sultán was announced to Him that He and His family were to be exiled to an unknown destination. Námiq Páshá could not bring himself to meet Bahá'u'lláh and give Him this news. At first he summons Him to the courthouse but when He refused to attend he asked Him to meet in the mosque. [CH81-82,BKG154–5; GPB147–8; RB1:229]

  • See BKG155–6 and GPB148 for the effect of this news on the believers.
  • Bahá'u'lláh and His family had been given Ottoman citizenship by this time. [BBRSM66]
  • See BKG156–8 for a list of those chosen by Bahá'u'lláh to migrate with Him.
  • See TN50–3 for the story of the sedition behind Bahá'u'lláh's removal from Baghdád.
  • Fearful of Bahá'u'lláh's growing influence in Baghdád, the Persian Consul had made representation to the Sultan to have Him delivered to the Persian authorities. The Sultan, although the Caliph of Sunni Islam, considered himself a mystical seeker and was no doubt intrigued with Bahá'u'lláh from the reports of the Governor of 'Akká, Námiq Páshá, and his own Prime Minister, 'Alí Páshá. This combination of sympathy and interest led the Ottoman government to invite Him to the capital rather than send Him to a remote location or return Him to Persia. [BBD196; BBIC13, 57note 68]
  • Baghdad; Iraq; Istanbul; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Governors; Namiq Pasha; Ottoman citizenship
    1863. 22 Apr - 3 May Declaration of Bahá'u'lláh in the Garden of Ridván.

    The garden was located in a large agricultural area immediately north of the walls of the city of Baghdad, about 450 metres (1,480 ft) from the city's northern Mu'azzam gate. Located on the eastern bank of the Tigris River in what is now the Bab al-Mu'azzam neighbourhood of Baghdad's Rusafa District, it was directly opposite the district in which Bahá'u'lláh lived during his stay in the city, on the river's western bank. [Wiki]

    Baghdad; Iraq Declaration Bahaullah; Ridvan garden; Najibiyyih Garden; Holy days; Life of Bahaullah; - Basic timeline
    1863 22 Apr Thirty–one days after Naw-Rúz, which in this year falls on 22 March, Bahá'u'lláh leaves His house for the last time and walks to the Najíbíyyih Garden, afterwards known as the Garden of Ridván (Paradise).
    • See BKG168, GPB149, RB1:260–1 and SA234–5 for details of His walk.
    • For the first time, He wears a tall táj as a symbol of His station. [BBD221; BKG176; GPB152]

      Bahá'u'lláh enters the Garden just as the call to afternoon prayer is being made. [GPB149; RB1:261]

    On this day Bahá'u'lláh declares His mission to a few of His disciples. [RB1:260, 262]

    • ‘Of the exact circumstances … we, alas, are but scantily informed.' [BKG173; GPB153]
    • For such details as are known, see BKG173–5 and GPB153.
    • For the import of the event, see BKG169–73; G27–35; GBP153–5.
    • This initiates the holy day of the First Day of Ridván, to be celebrated on 21 April. [BBD196]
    • This marks the end of the dispensation of the Báb and of the first epoch of the Heroic or Apostolic Age of the Bahá'í dispensation. [BBD72, 79]

    On the same day Bahá'u'lláh makes three important statements to His followers:

    1. He forbids the use of the sword.
    2. He states that no other Manifestations will appear before one thousand years. This is later reiterated in the Kitáb-i-Badí‘ and in The Kitáb-i-Aqdas.
    3. He states that, as from this moment, all the names and attributes of God are manifested within all created things, implying the advent of a new Day. [RB1:278–80]

    On the afternoon of Bahá'u'lláh's arrival at the Garden He reveals the Lawh-i-Ayyúb for Hájí Muhammad-i-Taqíy-i-Nayrízí. [SA239]

    During the 12 days in the Ridván Garden Bahá'u'lláh confides to ‘Abdu'l-Bahá that He is ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. [CH82]

    • See CH82–3 for the effect of this announcement on ‘Abdu'l-Bahá.
    Baghdad; Iraq Naw-Ruz; Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Declaration of; Ridvan garden; Najibiyyih Garden; Ages (time); Lawh-i-Ayyub; Haji Muhammad-i-Taqiy-i-Nayrizi; Abdul-Baha, Life of; - Basic timeline; Firsts, Other
    1863. 30 Apr Bahá'u'lláh's family joins Him in the Garden. [BKG175; RB1:281; SA235]

    • This initiates the holy day of the Ninth Day of Ridván, to be celebrated on 29 April. [BBD 196]
    Najibiyyih Garden; Iraq Bahaullah, Family of; Ridvan Festival
    1863. 3 May Bahá'u'lláh leaves the Garden of Ridván.

    • This initiates the holy day the Twelfth Day of Ridván, to be celebrated on 2 May. [BBD196]
    • As He is about to leave He reveals a Tablet addressed to Áqá Mírzá Áqá in Shíráz. It brings relief and happiness to those who receive it. [EB222]
    • His leaving is accompanied by symbolic signs of His station: He rides a horse rather than a donkey and wears a tall táj. [BBD221; BKG176]
    • See BKG175–6, GPB155 and RB1:281–2 for descriptions of the scenes that accompanied His departure.

    Bahá'u'lláh and His party arrive at Firayját, about three miles away on the banks of the Tigris. [BKG176]

    • They remain here for seven days. [BKG176]
    • See BKG for a description of activities during this period.
    Baghdad; Firayjat; Iraq; Shiraz; Iran; Persia Bahaullah, Life of; Ridvan Festival; Aqa Mirza Aqay-i-Afnan (Nurud-Din); Afnan; Horses; Donkeys; Taj; Tigris; Rivers; Ridvan garden; Najibiyyih Garden
    1863. 9 May Bahá'u'lláh and His party leave Firayját for Istanbul although at this point the destination is unknown to the exiles. [CH57, GPB156; SA235]

    • The journey takes 110 days. [GPB156]
    • For the details of the journey see BKG176–96; GPB1567; SW13:277.
    • See BKG180 for a map of the journey.
    • They pass through the following:
      
      Judaydih
      Dilí-'Abbás
      Qarih-Tapih
      Saláhíyyih (stay two nights)
      Dúst-Khurmátú
      Táwuq
      Karkúk (stay two days)
      Irbíl
      By the River Záb
      Bartallih
      Mosul (stay three days)
      Zákhú
      Jazírih
      Nisíbín
      Hasan-Áqá
      Márdiín
      Díyár-Bakr (stay two days)
      Ma'dan-Mis
      Khárpút (stay two or three days)
      Ma'dan-Nuqrih
      Dilik-Tásh
      Sívás
      Túqát
      Amasia (stay two days)
      Iláhíyyih (the last day of the overland journey)
      Sámsún on the Black Sea. (110 days after departure) [The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p43]
    • For the number of people on the journey see BKG179 (72), GPB156 (26 plus members of His family plus guards), RB2:5–6 (54) and SW13:277 (72).
    • As the party draws close to Sámsún on the Black Sea Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Súriy-i-Hawdaj. [BKG195; RB2:6]
    • The party remains in Sámsún for seven days. [GPB157]
    Firayjat; Samsun; Istanbul; Judaydih; Dili-'Abbas; Qarih-Tapih; Salahiyyih; Dust-Khurmatu; Tawuq; Karkuk; Irbil; Bartallih; Mosul; Zakhu; Jazirih; Nisibin; Hasan-Áqa; Mardiin; Diyar-Bakr; Ma'dan-Mis; Kharput; Ma'dan-Nuqrih; Dilik-Tash; Sivas; Tuqat; Amasia; Ilahiyyih Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Journeys; Black Sea; Suriy-i-Hawdaj
    1863 16 Aug - 1 Dec Bahá'u'lláh resides in Constantinople. [BKG197, 204; GPB157–61]
    • See BKG197–204 for an account of Bahá'u'lláh's stay.
    • His arrival in Constantinople and stay of about 5 years marks the first time in history that a Manifestation of God had set foot in the European continent. [Message from the Universal House of Justice dated 2 June, 1982 addressed To the Friends gathered at the International Conference in Dublin.]

    • Among the works Bahá'u'lláh reveals in Constantinople is Mathnaví-i-Mubárak. [RB2:29–54]

    News is brought to Bahá'u'lláh by Shamsí Big of the possibility that He will be transferred to Adrianople. [BKG199]

    Bahá'u'lláh refuses to leave, on pain of martyrdom, but Mírzá Yahyá and his comrades, cowardly and fearful, persuade Him to go. [BKG201–3]

    Sultán ‘Abdu'l-‘Azíz issues an edict banishing Bahá'u'lláh to Adrianople. [GPB159–60; RB2:57]

    • See BBIC:34, note 68, BKG201 and GPB159 for reasons for the edict.

      On the same day Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Lawh-i-‘Abdu'l-‘Azíz-Va-Vukalá, a Tablet addressed to the Sultán. When the Grand Vizier peruses it he turns pale. The text of this Tablet is lost. [BKG206; GPB160]

    Istanbul; Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Mathnavi-i-Mubarak; Shamsi Big; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Sultan Abdul-Aziz; Lawh-i-Abdul-Aziz-Va-Vukala; Grand Viziers
    1863. 19 Oct Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Tablet of the Bell (Subhánika-Yá-Hú). [BKG206; BW14:632; RB2:18]
    • See SDH41-43 for the story of Hájí Mirzá Haydar-'Alí and the use of this tablet during his imprisonment in Egypt.
    Istanbul; Turkey; Egypt Bahaullah, Writings of; Lawh-i-Naqus (Tablet of the Bell); Haji Mirza Haydar-Ali; Declaration of the Bab
    1863. 1 Dec Bahá'u'lláh and His companions leave Istanbul for Adrianople. [BKG204; GPB161; RB2:427]

    • The journey takes twelve days and they pass through the following villages en route. [BKG204; GPB161,The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p43]
    • chik-Chakmachih
      Buyúk-Chakmachih
      Salvarí
      Birkás
      Bábás
      Bábá-Iskí
      
    • See BKG204–5, GPB161 and RB2:62 for the rigours of the journey. The winter is extremely cold and the travellers are not clad for freezing weather.
    Istanbul; Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Winter
    1863 probably near end Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Súriy-Mulúk (Súrih of Kings). [BKG245; GPB171–2; RB2:301-336]
    • This is described by Shoghi Effendi as ‘the most momentous Tablet revealed by Bahá'u'lláh', in which He, ‘for the first time, directs His words collectively to the entire company of the monarchs of East and West'. [GPB171]
    • See GPB172–5 and RB2:301–25 for a description of the content of the Tablet.
    • In The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953: Information Statistical & Comparative p41 Shoghi Effendi dates this tablet as "1863". Given the intense activity of that year an assumption was made that it was revealed near the end of the year in either Constantinople or Adrianople.

    Chronological list of significant events related to Bahá'u'lláh's historic pronouncement in the Súriy-i-Múlúk
         Fall of the French Monarchy (1870)
         Virtual Extinction of the Pope's Temporal Sovereignty (1870)
         Assassination of Sultán 'Abdu'l-'Azíz (1876)
         Assassination of Násiri'd-Dín Sháh (1896)
         Overthrow of Sultán 'Abdu'l-Hamíd II (1909)
         Fall of the Portuguese Monarchy (1910)
         Fall of the Chinese Monarchy (1916)
         Fall of the Russian Monarchy (1917)
         Fall of the German Monarchy (1918)
         Fall of the Austrian Monarchy (1918)
         Fall of the Hungarian Monarchy (1918)
         Fall of the Turkish Monarchy (1922)
         Collapse of the Caliphate (1924)
         Fall of the Qájár Dynasty (1925)
         Fall of the Spanish Monarchy (1931)
         Fall of the Albanian Monarchy (1938)
         Fall of the Serbian Monarchy (1941)
         Fall of the Italian Monarchy (1946)
         Fall of the Bulgarian Monarchy (1946)
         Fall of the Rumanian Monarchy (1947) [The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p41-42]
    Edirne; Istanbul; Turkey Suriy-i-Muluk (Surih to the Kings); Tablets to kings and rulers; Timelines; History (general); Summons of the Lord of Hosts (book); Bahaullah, Writings of; - Basic timeline
    1864 Mírzá Yahyá makes an attempt on Bahá'u'lláh's life in the public bath see Ch60, BKG227–30, CB82–3, GPB166 and RB2:158–61. Edirne; Turkey Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Bahaullah, Attempts on; Public baths
    1864. 15 Aug Birth of Mírzá Díyá'u'lláh, the third son of Bahá'u'lláh and Mahdi-‘Ulyá. [BKG222] Edirne; Turkey Mirza Diyaullah; Bahaullah, Family of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum)
    1864. Dec Death of Governor Sulaymán Páshá of Adrianople. He is succeeded by ‘Árif Páshá, who is not well-disposed to Bahá'u'lláh and His followers. [BBR487] Adrianople; Edirne; Turkey Governors; Sulayman Pasha; Arif Pasha; Life of Bahaullah
    1864 Dec Mírzá Yahyá invites Bahá'u'lláh to a feast and shares a dish, half of which was laced with poison. Bahá'u'lláh is ill for 21 days following this attempt and is left with a shaking hand for the rest of His life. [CH60, BKG225; GPB165]
    • Bahá'u'lláh is attended by a foreign doctor named Shíshmán who dies shortly after seeing Him. Bahá'u'lláh intimates that the doctor has sacrificed his life for Him. [BKG225; GPB166]
    Edirne; Turkey Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Bahaullah, Attempts on; Poison; Sacrifice
    1864 c. At some point during this period After years of imprisonment in Tehran, Àbdu'r '-Rasúl-Qumí visited Bahá'u'lláh in Adrianople then took up residence in Baghdad, caring for the garden of the House of Bahá'u'lláh. He was well-known to the Muslims and a target of their attacks. One morning as he was carrying skins of water from the Tigris River he was ambushed by a number of attackers and was mortally wounded. He managed to disperse the assailants, drag himself to the garden where he watered the flowers for the last time.

    His name is mentioned in many Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, consoling his family. His son was appointed caretaker of the pilgrims in 'Akká and he served in this capacity until the days of Shoghi Effendi. [FAA8]

    Baghdad; Iraq; Edirne; Turkey House of Bahaullah (Baghdad); Abdur-Rasul-Qumi; Gardeners; Caretakers; Murders
    1865. c. 1865 Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Arabic Tablet of Ahmad (Lawh-i-Ahmad) for Ahmad, a believer from Yazd. [RB2:107]
    • See RB2:107–66 for the story of Ahmad.
    • See Bahá'í News pg 541 (March 1967) for A Flame of Fire: The Story of the Tablet of Ahmad by A.Q. Faizi. Part 2 of the story is found in the April 1967 edition. It is also found at Bahá'í Library.
    • See RB2:119–26 for an analysis of the Tablet.
    • Shoghi Effendi states that the Tablet has a special potency and significance. [DG60]
    • See "Ahmad, The Flame of Fire" by Darius Shahrokh.
    Edirne; Turkey; Yazd; Iran Bahaullah, Writings of; Lawh-i-Ahmad (Tablet of Ahmad (Arabic))
    1866. c. Mar 1866 The Most Great Separation. Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Súriy-i-Amr (Súrih of Command) for Mírzá Yahyá. [CH60, 83, CB84; GBP166]
    • This is the formal announcement to the nominee of the Báb of the station of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest' and a summons for him to pay allegiance to His Cause. [CB83–4; RB2:161]
    • Bahá'u'lláh directs his amanuensis to take the Tablet to Mírzá Yáhyá. He becomes very angry and a "jealous fire consumed him". He responds by claiming that he is the recipient of a divine revelation and all must turn to him. [CH60, BKG230; CB84; GPB166–7; RB2:162]
    • The announcement that Bahá'u'lláh was the Promised One spread quickly to Iraq and to Persia. The followers were happy for the clarification and glad to be rid of Yáhyá. Only the express command of Bahá'u'lláh prevented them from ridding the world of such nefarious traitor. [CH61]
    • It is believed that Yáhyá's conduct and accusations precipitated the next exile. [CH61]
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Suriy-i-Amr (Surih of Command); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); People Most Great Separation; Firsts, other
    1866. 10 Mar Bahá'u'lláh and His family withdraw from the house of Amru'lláh, the residence shared with the exiles, and go to the house of Ridá Big. [BKG230; GPB167; RB2:162]

    • He stays in this house for about one year. [GPB168]
    • See BKG235 for a description of the house of Ridá Big.

    Bahá'u'lláh goes into isolation for two months. He orders that all of the family's goods should be divided. The companions are to choose between Himself and Azal. This has become known as the ‘Most Great Separation'. [BBRSM67; BKG230–2; GPB167–8; RB2:162]

    • See BKG231–2, GPB167 and RB2:163 for the effect of this.
    • See BBRSM59–60 for a description of Azal's leadership.
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; House of Amrullah; Rida Big; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Most Great Separation
    1866 10 Mar - c. Mar 1867 Bahá'u'lláh reveals numerous Tablets in the months that follow.

    • See GBP170–1 for a description of the number of verses revealed every day.
    • See BKG245 and GPB171 for list of Tablets revealed before Bahá'u'lláh's arrival in the house of ‘Izzat Áqá.
    • In addressing the Tablets to the Kings and the Queens of the earth Baha'u'lláh addressed them as "Servants of the Most High God and Guardians under Him of the people entrusted to their guidance" and called on them to join with Him in establishing an International Arbitration Council so that humanity should never again suffer the misery of war. His approach was now more direct, He claimed Divine authority and that He was the Chosen One, Whom, under various names, all the religions of the world were awaiting. [CH63]
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Writings of; House of Izzat Aqa; Tablets to Kings and rulers; International Arbitration Council; Peace
    1867 Birth of Mírzá Badí'u'lláh, fourth son of Bahá'u'lláh and Mahd-i‘Ulyá in Adrianople. [BKG247] Edirne; Turkey Mirza Badiullah; Bahaullah, Family of; Mahd-i-Ulya (Fatimih Khanum); Births and deaths
    1867. c. Mar Bahá'u'lláh moves back to the now empty house of Amru'lláh. [GPB168]
    • He stays for about three months. [GPB168]
    • BKG239 says that within six months of Bahá'u'lláh's return to the house the owner sold it.
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Houses of; House of Amrullah
    1867. c. Jun Bahá'u'lláh rents the house of ‘Izzat Áqá. [BKG239; GPB168]

    • See BKG241 for a description of this house.
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Houses of; Bahaullah, Life of; House of Izzat Aqa; Houses
    1867. c. Aug Bahá'u'lláh refuses to draw the allowance granted Him by the Ottoman government. [RB2:327]

    • Mírzá Yahyá twice petitions the government to convince it that he ought to be the recipient of the allowance. [RB2:327]
    • Bahá'u'lláh sells some of His belongings to provide the necessities for Himself and His dependents. [RB2:327]
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Ottoman government; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal)
    1867 Sep - Aug 1868 Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Kitáb-i-Badí‘, the Munájátháy-i-Síyám (Prayers for Fasting), the first Tablet to Napoleon III, the Lawh-i-Sultán written to Násiri'd-Dín Sháh, and the Súriy-i-Ra'ís. [BKG245; GBP172]

    • See RB2:370–82 for details of the Kitáb-i-Badí‘.

    Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Súriy-i-Ghusn (Tablet of the Branch) in which ‘Abdu'l-Bahá's future station is foreshadowed. [BBD218; BKG250; GPB177]

    • See RB2:338–9 for a description of the Tablet.
    Edirne; Turkey Bahaullah, Writings of; Suriy-i-Muluk (Surih to the Kings); Kitab-i-Badi (Wondrous Book); Munajathay-i-Siyam (Prayers for Fasting); Lawh-i-Napulyun (Tablet to Napoleon III) ; Lawh-i-Sultan (Tablet to Nasirid-Din Shah); Suriy-i-Rais (Tablet to Sultan Ali Pasha); Suriy-i-Ghusn (Tablet of the Branch); Abdul-Baha, Life of; Firsts, Other
    1967 Sep Mírzá Yahyá, prodded on by Mír Muhammad, challenges Bahá'u'lláh to a public confrontation in the mosque of Sultán Salím, thinking that He will not accept. In the end, it is Mírzá Yahyá who does not appear. [BKG239–41; GPB168–9; RB2:291–300, SDH22]

    • The incident gains Bahá'u'lláh respect in the eyes of the people. [RB2:289]
    • See [RB2:304] for a picture of the mosque.
    Edirne; Turkey Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Mir Muhammad; Bahaullah, Life of; Confrontation; Mosques; Challenges
    1867 Sep - Aug 1868 Nabíl-i-A‘zam is dispatched to Iraq and Iran to inform the Bábís of the advent of Bahá'u'lláh. He is further instructed to perform the rites of pilgrimage on Bahá'u'lláh's behalf in the House of the Báb and the Most Great House in Baghdad. [BKG250; EB224; GPB176–7]
    • For details of his mission see EB224–7.
    • On hearing Nabíl's message, the wife of the Báb, Khadíjih Khánum, immediately recognizes the station of Bahá'u'lláh. [EB225]
    • For the rites of the two pilgrimages performed by Nabíl see SA113–15. The first pilgrimages to the residence of Bahá'u'lláh take place. [GPB177]
    Shiraz; Iran; Baghdad; Iraq Nabil-i-Azam; Pilgrimage; Khadijih Khanum; House of Bahaullah (Baghdad)
    1868 – 1870 During this period Bahá'u'lláh reveals a number of Tablets to rulers including the Lawh-i-Ra'ís to `Alí Páshá, His second Tablet to Napoleon III and Tablets to Czar Alexander II, Queen Victoria and Pope Pius IX. [BBD13]
    • President Grant of the United States is in office when Bahá'u'lláh addresses a Tablet to the `Rulers of America and the Presidents of the Republics therein'. [BFA1:80N]
    Akka Ali Pasha; Lawh-i-Napulyun (Tablet to Napoleon III); Lawh-i-Pap (Tablet to Pope Pius IX); Lawh-i-Malikih (Tablet to Queen Victoria); Tablet to Czar Alexander II; President Grant; Lawh-i-Rais (Tablet to Sultan Ali Pasha); Tablets to Kings and rulers; Summons of the Lord of Hosts (book); Bahaullah, Writings of
    1868. 26 Jul Sultán `Abdu'l-`Azíz issues a firmán condemning Bahá'u'lláh to perpetual banishment. [BKG283–4; GPB179, 186; RB2:401–2]
    • See RB2:402 for a list of those included in the edict.
    • BKG261, GPB181 and RB2:403 indicate that it was not until the party reached Gallipoli that they were informed that their ultimate destination was `Akká.
    • BBD40 says that it was because of the disloyal Mírzá Yahyá's plotting against Bahá`u`lláh that the Turkish authorities condemned Him to perpetual imprisonment in `Akká.
    Edirne; Turkey; Baghdad; Iraq; Gallipoli; Akka Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Sultan Abdul-Aziz; Khurshid Pasha; Firmans; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal)
    1868. Aug One morning without warning Bahá'u'lláh's house is surrounded by soldiers. The inhabitants are rounded up and taken to government headquarters. They are told to make ready for their departure for Gallipoli. [BKG255; GPB179; RB2:403]
    • The party was given three days to prepare for the journey. It it had been rumoured that they were to be separated, Bahá'u'lláh to one place, 'Abdu'l-Bahá to another and the friends to still another place. [CH62]
    • One of the companions, Karilá'í Ja'far was so grieved by the threatened separation that he attempted to kill himself. He was prevented from do so but was too ill to travel. Bahá'u'lláh refused to leave until the Governor in Adrianople made a promise to care for him until he was well enough to travel. He joined the friends in 'Akká forty days after their arrival. [CH62, RoB1p97-98]
    • The Consuls of European powers offer assistance to Bahá'u'lláh and are prepared to ask the intervention of their governments. Bahá'u'lláh refuses these offers. [BKG255, 257–8]
    • Western accounts of this incident suggest that Bahá`u`lláh asked for such assistance. [BBR187–91]
    • The next day the goods of the Bahá'ís are sold or auctioned for very low prices. [BKG255, 258]
    • Group and individual photographs are taken of the Bahá'í and Azalí exiles in Adrianople, including one of Bahá'u'lláh.
    Adrianople Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of
    1868. 12 Aug Bahá'u'lláh, His family and companions, escorted by soldiers, set out for Gallipoli. [BKG260; GPB180; RB2:409]
    • En route they pass through the villages of Uzún-Kuprí and Káshánih. [The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p44]
    Edirne; Gallipoli; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of
    1868. 15 Aug The Bahá'ís imprisoned in Constantinople arrive in Gallipoli to be exiled with Bahá'u'lláh's party. [BKG260] Gallipoli; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of
    1868. 16 Aug They arrive in Gallipoli on the fifth day. [BKG260]
    • GPB180 says it was a four-day journey. CH62 says it took three days of travel by cart and wagon.
    • They remain there for three nights. CH62 says they remained there for a week awaiting replies to telegrams that had been sent to Constantinople. [BKG263; GPB181]
    • BKG261 says they were there for `a few days'.
    Gallipoli; Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of
    1868. 21 Aug Bahá'u'lláh and His companions leave Gallipoli on an Austrian-Lloyd steamer. CH62 says it was a Turkish boat. [BKG263; GPB182; RB2:411]
    • There were 72 exiles, 10 soldiers and 2 officers. The journey took 11 days. [CH63]
    • See BKG270 for map of the journey.
    • Towards sunset the same day the steamer touches on Madellí and stops for a few hours. It continues on to Smyrna the same night. [BKG264]
    • Mírzá Yahyá and the four Bahá'ís arrested at Constantinople, including Mishkín-Qalam, are sent to Famagusta in Cyprus. [BKG268; GPB179]
    Gallipoli; Madelli; Smyrna; Famagusta; Turkey; Cyprus Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Ships; Mishkin-Qalam; Mirza Aliy-i-Sayyah-i-Maraghihi (Mulla Adi-Guzal); Aqa Abdul-Ghaffar; Aqa Muhammad-Baqir (Qahvih-chiy-i Mahallati); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Exile; Cyprus exiles
    1868. 22 Aug Soon after sunrise the ship arrives at Smyrna. [BKG264]
    • It stays for two days. [BKG264; GPB182]
    • The illness of Mírzá Áqáy-i-Káshání (Jináb-i-Muníb) necessitates his removal to the hospital. He dies before 'Abdu'l-Bahá and Mírzá Musá can return to the ship. 'Abdu'l-Bahá makes arrangements with the local funeral director. They hold a simple funeral and burial takes place in Izmír. [CH65, BKG264–5; GPB182]
    • This young and vibrant man arrived in Baghdad before the exile and travelled with the party holding the bridle of the horse of Bahá'u'lláh the whole route, often with 'Abdu'l-Bahá on the other side. When the party reached Constantinople he was instructed to go on teaching trip to Persia and to Iraq, a long and an arduous tour. He rejoined the group in Adrianople just prior to the exile and he was in precarious condition but begged Bahá'u'lláh for permission to be included. It is reported in FAA21 that he died two or three days after the departure of the ship.
    Izmir (Smyrna); Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Mirza Aqay-i-Kashani
    1868. 23 Aug The steamer leaves Smyrna at night for Alexandria, which she gains on a morning two days later. [BKG265] Izmir (Smyrna); Turkey; Alexandria; Egypt Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Ships
    1868 26 - 27 Aug The steamer carrying Bahá'u'lláh docks at Alexandria, early in the morning. [BKG265; RB3:6]
    • The exiles change ships, again onto an Austrian-Lloyd ship. [BKG265]
    • Several exiles go ashore to make purchases. One passes by the prison house where Nabíl is detained. Nabíl, watching from the roof of his prison cell, recognizes him. [CH65, BKG265, 267; RB3:6]
    • Nabíl and Fáris Effendi write letters to Bahá'u'lláh which are delivered by a Christian youth. The youth returns with a Tablet from Bahá'u'lláh and gifts from `Abdu'l-Bahá and Mírzá Mihdí. [BKG267–8; RB3:6–7]
    • The ship bearing Bahá'u'lláh and the exiles leaves Alexandria for Port Said. [BKG268]
    Alexandria; Egypt Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Nabil-i-Azam; Faris Effendi; Gifts; Ships
    1868. 29 Aug In the morning the ship arrives in Port Said. At nightfall it travels on to Jaffa. [BKG268] Port Said; Jaffa; Israel Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Ships
    1868. 30 Aug The ship arrives at Jaffa at sunset. At midnight the ship leaves for Haifa. [BKG168] Jaffa; Haifa; Israel Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Ships
    1868. 31 Aug The ship arrives in Haifa in the early morning. [BKG269; GPB182; RB3:11]
    • Bahá'u'lláh and His companions — 70 in all — disembark and are taken ashore in sailing boats. [RB3:11]
    • One of the Bahá'ís, Áqá `Abdu'l-Ghaffár, one of the four companions condemned to share the exile of Mírzá Yahyá, throws himself into the sea when he learns he is to be separated from Bahá'u'lláh. [BKG269; GPB182]
    A few hours later Bahá'u'lláh's party is put aboard a sailing vessel and taken to `Akká. [RB3:12]
    • See CH66 for Bahíyyih Khánum's account of the journey.
    The exiles land in `Akká to begin a confinement in the citadel that is to last two years, two months and five days. [CH67, BBR205; BKG169; DH12; RB3:11]
    • See BKG277–9 for a list of the exiles. Two others joined them immediately after arrival. [BBR205]
    • See BR205–6 for `Abdu'l-Bahá's account of the journey of exile.
    • See RB32:2 and RB3:21 for prophecies regarding Bahá'u'lláh's exile to `Akká.
    • DH17–24 for a history of `Akká before the arrival of Bahá'u'lláh.
    • See DH26–8 and GPB186–7 for a description of the exiles' walk to the prison.
    • See GPB186–7 for Bahá'u'lláh's description of the citadel and the conditions there on His arrival.
    • See BKG275–7 for Áqá Ridá's description of the citadel and the conditions there.
    • See DH30–1 for a description of the citadel building and the accommodation used by Bahá'u'lláh.
    • The first night the exiles are refused both food and drink. [GPB187]
    • Afterwards each prisoner is allocated three loaves of stale black bread as a daily food ration plus filthy water. [GBP187]
    • Within two days all fell ill with typhoid but for two, 'Abdu'l-Bahá and another man who was able to help Him nurse and care for the others. [CH234]
    • Three of the exiles die soon after arrival. Soon after their death Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Lawh-i-Ra'ís, the second Tablet to `Alí Páshá. [BKG283; GPB187; RB3:20, 34]
    • See BKG317–21 and CH250–1 for the story of the Azalís who were confined to `Akká with the exiles.
    • See BBRSM69–70 for details on the system of communications used between the Holy Land and the Bahá'í communities.
    • At first the Governor was disinclined to relax the strict rules of the exiles but eventually allowed Mírzá Ja'far to go into town, accompanied by a soldier, to purchase food. 'Abdu'l-Bahá had sent Mírzá 'bdu'l-Ahad ahead some time before with instructions to open a shop. It was six months before the exiles could make contact with him. During this time a Greek, Dr. Petro, became a friend and, after having made investigations, assured the Governor that the exiles were not criminals. [CH67]
    • The King of Martyrs and his brother The Beloved of Martyrs were the first to make contact with the exiles by telegraph. They were able to provide much need assistance. [CH67]
    • After the restrictions had been relaxed somewhat Shaykh Salmán was able to function as a courier carrying Tablets and letter to and from Persia. When he was arrested in Aleppo, carrying a most important supplication from a friend in Persia to Bahá'u'lláh, he swallowed the letter to avoid detection. [CH67-68]
    Haifa; Famagusta; Akka; Israel; Cyprus Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Mishkin-Qalam; Aqa Abdul-Ghaffar; Lawh-i-Rais (Tablet to Sultan Ali Pasha); Petro. Dr; Mirza Jafar; Citadel; Prophecies; Cyprus exiles; Exile; Firsts, Other
    1868. 3 Sep The firmán of the Sultán `Abdu'l-`Azíz condemning Bahá'u'lláh to life imprisonment is read out in the Mosque of Al-Jazzár. [BKG284–5; GPB186; RB3:18]
    • See CH64, BKG283–4, 286; GBP186, RB2:402 and RB3:18 for the terms of the edict. They were labelled as malefactors, sowerw of sedition, hardened criminals, enemies of the pure religion of God and of man. The faithful were commanded to shun these outcasts. All of those that did a disservice to the captives might flatter themselves that they "did service to God".
    • See RB3:18–19 for `Abdu'l-Bahá's response.
    • See BKG283–8, RB3:19-20 for conditions of life in the barracks.
    • The local authorities and the clerics did their part to stir up the populus against the exiles. See DH197 and CH239-242 for the story of a man who made an attempt on the life of Bahá'u'lláh.
    • From this time forward Bahá'u'lláh met only with His
    Akka; Israel Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Firmans; Mosque of Al-Jazzar
    1870 `Údí Khammár completes the restoration and expansion of the mansion at Bahjí originally built by `Abdu'lláh Páshá in 1821. [BBD42, 128; DH106-107]
    • See DH107 for the inscription he places over the door.
    Akka Udi Khammar; Abdullah Pasha; Bahji; Inscriptionss; House of Bahaullah (Bahji)
    1871 c. May Bahá'u'lláh is transferred to the house of Rábi`ih. [GPB189]
    • His occupation of this house lasts four months. [BKG319; DH38–9]
    Akka House of Rabiih; Bahaullah, Houses of
    1871 mid-year `Údí Khammár, a wealthy Maronite Christian merchant, and his family move into the recently restored mansion at Bahjí, leaving their `Akká house empty. [BKG316–17; DH203] Bahji Udi Khammar; Bahji; House of Udi Khammar; Bahaullah, Houses of
    1871. Sep Bahá'u'lláh is transferred to the house of `Údí Khammár in `Akká. [BBD109; BKG317; DH39, 203; GPB189]
    • The house is so small that 13 people of both sexes occupy one room. The remainder of Bahá'u'lláh's companions take up residence in other houses and the Khán-i-`Avámíd. [GBP189]
    • Bahá'u'lláh's occupation of this house lasts two years. [BKG319]
    • See BKG317 for the initial response of His neighbour, Ilyás `Abbúd.
    • See DH201–3 for a biography of `Údí Khammár.
    Akka Bahaullah, Houses of; House of Udi Khammar; Udi Khammar; House of Abbud; Ilyas Abbud; Khan-i-Avamid
    1871. End of the year Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Lawh-i-Qad Ihtaraqa'l-Mukhlisun (Fire Tablet). It was revealed in answer to a letter from one of His devoted followers in Persia, Haji Siyyid 'Ali-Akbar-i-Dahaji. In a passage, as yet untranslated, addressed to the uncle of Haji Siyyid 'Ali-Akbar, Bahá'u'lláh states that He revealed the Fire Tablet for the his nephew so that it might create in him feelings of joy as well as igniting in his heart the fire of the love of God. It was revealed at a time when great afflictions and sorrows had surrounded Bahá'u'lláh as a result of the hostility, betrayal and acts of infamy perpetrated by those few individuals who had once claimed to be the helpers of the Cause of God. [BKG321–2; RB3:226–31] Akka Lawh-i-Qad-Ihtaraqal-Mukhlisun (Fire Tablet); Haji Siyyid 'Ali-Akbar-i-Dahaji; Bahaullah, Writings of
    1872. 22 Jan Three Azalís, among them Siyyid Muhammad-i-Isfahání, the Antichrist of the Bahá'í Revelation, are murdered by seven Bahá'ís. [BBD163; BKG3256 DH41; GPB189; RB3:235]
    • Siyyid Muhammad Isfahání, Nasr’ulláh Tafríshí, Áqá Ján Ka’j Kuláh and Ridá Qulí these four kept vigil near the land gate to ensure no one would meet Bahá’u’lláh. They kept watch from the second story window of a building overlooking the land gate so that if a pilgrim, after spending some six months traveling on foot, intended to enter the city they could somehow prevent his entrance. This situation lasted for some time. After two years and a few months, Bahá’u’lláh was released from the prison. Some of the friends, including Salmání, decided to get rid of these enemies and during the night went to their place and killed Siyyid Muhammad, Áqá Ján and another person. [Sweet and Enchanting Stories, Aziz Rohani, P 31]
    • Bahá'u'lláh is taken to the Governorate where He is interrogated and imprisoned for 70 hours. [BKG327; GBP190; RB3:237]
    • `Abdu'l-Bahá is thrown into prison and kept in chains the first night. Twenty–five of the companions were also imprisoned and shackled. [BKG328; GBP190; RB3:237]
    • See BKG331, GPB191 and RB3:238 for the effect of the murders on the local population.
    • Ilyás `Abbúd puts a barricade between his house and the house of `Údí Khammár, where Bahá'u'lláh lives. [BKG331; GPB191]
    • See BKG330, DH44 and RB3:239 for the fate of the murderers, who are imprisoned for seven years.
    Akka Siyyid Muhammad-i-Isfahani; Ilyas Abbud; House of Abbud; House of Udi Khammar; Bahaullah, Houses of; Antichrist; Murders; Opposition; Azali Babis
    1873 Late in the year Bahá'u'lláh acquires the house of `Abbúd. It is joined to the house of `Údí Khammár to make one residence and Bahá'u'lláh moves to the side of the house previously occupied by `Abbúd. [BBD106, 109; BKG319; DH51]
    • He lives here for four years. [BBD106, 109; BKG319; DH51]
    • See BBD1 for information on Ilyás `Abbúd.
    Akka Ilyas Abbud; House of Abbud; Bahaullah, Houses of
    1879 `Abdu'l-Bahá travels to Beirut at the invitation of Midhat Páshá, the Válí of Syria. [BKG378]
    • `Abdu'l-Bahá is still officially a prisoner of the Ottoman Empire. BKG379]
    • Bahá'u'lláh reveals a Tablet marking the occasion. [BKG378–9; GPB243; TB227–8]
    • Among the important figures `Abdu'l-Bahá meets in Beirut are Midhat Páshá himself and Shaykh Muhammad `Abduh, the future Grand Muftí of Egypt. [BKG379]
    Beirut; Lebanon Midhat Pasha; Shaykh Muhammad Abduh; Grand Mufti of Egypt; Lawh-i-Ard-i-Ba (Tablet of the Land of Ba); Bahaullah, Writings of
    1879. Summer An epidemic of plague breaks out in `Akká and environs. Among others who feel its effects are `Údí Khammár and his family who leave the mansion at Bahjí. [BBD42, 128; BKG362; DH91, 203; GPB194] Akka; Bahji Udi Khammar; Bahaullah, Houses of; Bahji, Mansion
    1881 to 1928 The second Trustee of the Huqúqu'lláh was Hájí Abu'l-Hasan-i-Ardikání, entitled Amín-i-Iláhí (Trusted of God). He had been a companion of Jináb-i-Sháh until his death in 1881 in a fatal attack. Hájí Sháh-Muhammad and Hájí Abu'l-Hasan had been the first believers to succeed in entering the city of 'Akká and attain the presence of Bahá'u'lláh in the public bath in the early days of His confinement in the Most Great Prison. [Message from the Universal House of Justice dated 25 March, 1985]
    • He travelled to Paris to obtain the presence of 'Abu'l-Bahá.
    • Shoghi Effendi named him a Hand of the Cause of God posthumously (July, 1928) and was he was also named one of the Apostles of Bahá'u'lláh. In appreciation of Hájí Amín's services, 'Abdu'l-Bahá named one of the doors of the Shrine of the Báb after him.
    • Upon his death Shoghi Effendi appointed Hájí Ghulám-Ridá (entitled Amín-i-Amín), who for several years had been Hájí Amín's assistant, to succeed him as Trustee of the Huqúq'u'lláh. [RoB3p74-86]
    Akka; BWC Huququllah; Huququllah, Trustees of; Haji Abul-Hasan-i-Ardikani (Amin-i-Ilahi); Hands of the Cause; Apostles of Bahaullah; Haji Shah-Muhammad-i-Manshadi (Aminul-Bayan); Haji Ghulam-Rida (Amin-i-Amin); Public baths
    1887 Mírzá Músá, Áqáy-i-Kalím, the faithful brother of Bahá'u'lláh, passes away in `Akká. [BBD166; BKG369; DH57]
    • He is buried in the Bahá'í section of the Muslim cemetery. [DH81]
    • He was designated by Shoghi Effendi as one of the 19 Apostles of Bahá'u'lláh. [BBD166; BW3:80–1]
    `Akka Mirza Musa; Aqay-i-Kalim; Apostles of Bahaullah; Karbalai Hasan Khan; Karbalai Sadiq
    1887. 13 Apr The first mention of the concept of `Hand of the Cause' in Bahá'u'lláh's writings is within a Tablet revealed in honour of Ibn-i-Asdaq. [BBD115; EB173] Ibn-i-Asdaq (Mirza Ali-Muhammad); Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Appointments; Firsts, Other; Bahaullah, Writings of
    1891 Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Kitáb-i-`Ahd. [BBD32; CB142; GPB236–40]
    • It was probably written at least one year before His Ascension. CB142]
    • Bahá'u'lláh alludes to it in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf as the `Crimson Book'. [DG16; ESW32; GPB238]
    • In it Bahá'u'lláh explicitly appoints `Abdu'l-Bahá His successor, the Centre of the Covenant and the Expounder of the revealed word. [BKG420; GPB239]
    Bahji Kitab-i-Ahd (Book of the Covenant); Bahaullah, Will and Testament of; Crimson Book; Covenant (general)
    1892. 29 May The Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh

    Bahá'u'lláh passes away at Bahjí in His seventy–fifth year. [AB47; BBRXXIX, 233; BKG420; CB148; GPB221; RB4:411]

    • For an account by Túbá Khánum see CH105–9.
    • Bahá'u'lláh has spent 23 years, 8 months and 29 (or 30) days in the Holy Land. [DH12]
    • He passes away eight hours after sunset. [GPB221; UD170]
    • The news of His passing is immediately communicated to Sultán `Abdu'l-Hamíd by `Abdu'l-Bahá: `the Sun of Bahá has set'. [AB47; BKG420 GPB222]
    • Shortly after sunset, on the very day of His passing, Bahá'u'lláh is buried beneath the floor of a room in the house adjacent to the mansion of Bahjí, the Qiblih of the Bahá'í Faith. [AB47; BBD211; BKG427; GPB222]
    • See CB149 and RB4:149 for the effect of Bahá'u'lláh's ascension on `Abdu'l-Bahá.
    • See ARG71-72 for `Abdu'l-Bahá's account of His attempt to convince Mírzá Muhammad-'Alí to be faithful to the Covenant.
    • See AB52–3, CB148–9 and RB4:148–9 for the theft of Bahá'u'lláh's cases containing His seals, papers and other items.
    • See AB52–61, CB148–51 and RB4:148–54 for the Covenant-breaking activities of Bahá'u'lláh's family immediately following His death.
    • See GPB222–3 for the mourning following the ascension of Bahá'u'lláh.
    • At this time the Faith has spread to 15 countries. [MBW61]
    • See BBR234–6 for a list of Europeans who met Bahá'u'lláh.
    Bahji Bahaullah, Ascension of; Bahaullah, Life of; Holy days; Sultan Abdul-Hamid; Covenant-breakers; Covenant (general); Qiblih; - Basic timeline
    1892 After the ascension of Bahá'u'lláh `Abdu'l-Bahá asks Nabíl to choose a number of passages from the writings of Bahá'u'lláh to be used as a Tablet of Visitation. This Tablet is also used at observances commemorating the Martyrdom of the Báb. [BBD234; BKG427; GPB222; RB4:419]
    • For an analysis of this Tablet, see SA121–2.
    `Abdu'l-Bahá rents the house now known as the Pilgrim House at Bahjí from its Christian owner Iskandar Hawwá', the husband of `Údí Khammár's daughter Haní. [DH114, 226]
    Pilgrim House at Bahji Bahaullah, Ascension of; Bahaullah, Life of; Holy days; Nabil-i-Akbar; Tablets of Visitation; Iskandar Hawwa; Nabil-i-Akbar
    1892. 7 Jun On the ninth day after Bahá'u'lláh's passing the Will and Testament of Bahá'u'lláh, the Kitáb-i-`Ahd, is read at Bahjí before a large assembly in His Most Holy Tomb. [AB51–2; BBD132; CB150; DH113; GPB238; RB4:419–20]
    • See CB150, 164 for the effect this has on the believers.
    Bahji Kitab-i-Ahd (Book of the Covenant); Bahaullah, Will and Testament of; Bahaullah, Shrine of
    1896 1 May The martyrdom of Hand of the Cause of God Varqa (‘Dove’), Mírzá ‘Ali-Muhammad. (b.1856) He and his young son, Ruhu’lláh, were killed by one of the Qajar courtiers in the aftermath of the assassination of Nasir'd-Din Shah. [GPB296, BBRXXIX]
    • See World Order: Winter 1974-1975, Vol. 9 No.2 p.43 for contribution by Kazem Kazemzadeh on the martyrdom of Varqá and Ruhu'lláh.
    • For the story of their lives see MRHK405–22 and World Order: Winter 1974-1975, Vol. 9 No.2 p29-44.
    • For a Western account of the episode see BBR361–2.
    • He was posthumously named a Hand of the Cause of God by 'Abdu'l-Bahá.
    • ‘Abdu’l-Bahá named him posthumously as a Hand of the Cause and Shoghi Effendi designated him as one of the Apostles of Bahá-u-lláh. [EB75-97 LoF42-49, BBR361-362, SoBSNBp225-229]
    • See World Order: Winter 1974-1975, Vol. 9 No.2 p.43 for contribution by Kazem Kazemzadeh on the martyrdom of Varqá and Ruhu'lláh.
    • See Varqá and Son: The Heavenly Doves by Darius Shahrokh.
    • See also Bahá'í Chronicles.
    Yazd; Tihran; Iran Mirza Ali-Muhammad Varqa; Ruhullah Varqa; In Memoriam; Births and deaths; Apostles of Bahaullah; Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Appointments by Abdul-Baha; Hands of the Cause, Appointments posthumously Hands of the Cause, Appointments; Persecution; Martyrs
    1897. 1 Mar The birth of Shoghi Effendi, in the house of `Abdu'lláh Páshá. [BBD208; BKG359; DH60, 214; GBF2]
    • He is descended from both the Báb and Bahá'u'lláh: his mother is the eldest daughter of `Abdu'l-Bahá; his father is an Afnán, a grandson of Hájí Mírzá `Abu'l-Qásim, a cousin of the mother of the Báb and a brother of His wife. [CB280; GBF2]
    • He is the Ghusn-i-Mumtáz, the Chosen Branch. [BBD87]
    • `Shoghi' means `one who longs'. [CB281]
    • `Abdu'l-Bahá commands everyone, even Shoghi Effendi's father, to add the title `Effendi' after his name. [CB281; GBF2]
    • `Abdu'l-Bahá gives him the surname Rabbání in the early years of his study in Haifa so that he will not be confused with his cousins, who are all called Afnán. Rabbání is also used by Shoghi Effendi's brothers and sister. [BBD191–2; DH60–1]
    • See GBF6 for the schools he attends.
    • See also Rabbani, The Priceless Pearl;

      Rabbani, The Guardian of the Bahá'í Faith;

      Giachery, Shoghi Effendi: Recollections.

    Akka Shoghi Effendi, Life of; House of Abdullah Pasha; Bahaullah; Family of; Abdul-Baha, Family of; Afnan; Aghsan; Haji Mirza Abul-Qasim; Rabbani (name)
    1905 -1906 The publication of The Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys. [7V74V]

    Two works written in Baghdad after Bahá’u’lláh returned from Kurdistan in 1856. The Seven Valleys was revealed in reply to a letter from Shaykh Muhiyi’d-Din, the religious judge of Khaniqin, who was a Sufi. The Four Valleys was addressed to Shaykh ‘Abdu’r-Rahman, leader of the Qadiriyyih Sufi order, with whom Bahá’u’lláh had been in contact in Sulaymaniyyih.

    “To these two outstanding contributions to the world’s religious literature, (Shoghi Effendi had written of the Kitáb-i-Íqán and the Hidden Words) … was added, during that same period, a treatise that may well be regarded as His greatest mystical composition, designated as the “Seven Valleys,”.., in which He describes the seven stages which the soul of the seeker must needs traverse ere it can attain the object of its existence.” [GPB140]

    In the West this was one of the earliest available books of Bahá'u'lláh, first translated directly to French in 1905, and English in 1906. [GPB140]

    The Seven Valleys was translated into English by Marzieh Gail in consultation with her father, Alí-Kuli Khan Nabil-al Douleh. The publication date of the first English translation was 1945 with an introduction added in 1952. The second edition of The Seven Valleys published in 1968 and 1975 by the US Bahá'í Publishing Trust.

    France; United States Haft Vadi (Seven Valleys); Chahar Vadi (Four Valleys); Kitab-i-Iqan (Book of Certitude); Kalimat-i-Maknunih (Hidden Words); Marzieh Gail; Ali-Kuli Khan; Bahaullah, Writings of; Translation
    1914 21 Jan Mírzá Abu'l-Fadl-i-Gulpáygání, Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh, passes away in Cairo. [AB404; BBD67]
    • For a brief biography see EM263–5, SDH113.
    • His resting place is now next to that of Lua Getsinger in the Bahá'í cemetery in Cairo.
    • His numerous works include Fará'id (The Peerless Gems) 1898; The Brilliant Proof; 1912; Bahá'í Proofs, 1902; and Al-Duraru'l-Bahíyih (The Shining Pearls, published in English as Miracles and Metaphors), 1900. [BBD7]
    Cairo; Egypt Mirza Abul-Fadl Gulpaygani; Apostles of Bahaullah; Lua Getsinger; Cemeteries and graves; Bahai cemeteries; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1915 (in the year) Jamál Páshá, Commander of the 4th Army Corps of the Turkish army, is put in military control of Syria, including the Holy Land. [AB412]
    • For an account of his relationship with ‘Abdu’l-Bahá see AB412–14.
    • He threatens to crucify ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and to destroy the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh. [AB414; GPB304, 317]
    Haifa; Akka Jamal Pasha; Bahaullah, Shrine of; Abdul-Baha, Life of; Abdul-Baha, Death threats to
    1918 Shaykh Kázim-i-Samandar, Apostle of Bahá'u'lláh, passes away early in the year.
    • For the story of his life see EB191-215.
    Iran Shaykh Kazim-i-Samandari; Apostles of Bahaullah; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1920 The House of Bahá'u'lláh in Baghdád is seized by Shí'ís. [BBD109; GBF33; GPB356-7] Baghdad; Iraq House of Bahaullah (Baghdad)
    1921 The Kingdom of Iraq under British Administration or Mandatory Iraq begins. It will last until 1932. [Mandatory Iraq] Iraq House of Bahaullah (Baghdad)
    1922 30 Jan Mírzá Muhammad-`Alí and Badí`u'lláh seize the keys to the Shrine of Bahá'u'lláh. [BBR456-7; CB288-9, 333; ER205; GBF18; PP53]
    • The governor of `Akká orders that the keys be handed over to the authorities and posts a guard at the Shrine. [BBR457; PP53-4]
    • For Western accounts of the episode see BBR456-7.
    Bahji Mirza Muhammad-Ali; Mirza Badiullah; Bahaullah, Shrine of
    1923 Early Sep J. E. Esslemont's Bahá'u'lláh and the New Era is published in Britain by George Allen and Unwin. [DJEE28; RG77]
    • Shoghi Effendi views this as a landmark in British Bahá'í history. [UD97]
    • Over the years he encourages its translation into dozens of languages. [RG77]
    • See DJEE37-8 for the importance of this work.
    United Kingdom Esslemont; Bahaullah and the New Era; Introductory
    1924 Nov The Supreme Court of Iraq decides against the Bahá'ís in the dispute over the House of Bahá'u'lláh in Baghdád. [UD37-8] Iraq Court cases; House of Bahaullah (Baghdad)
    1927 The Baghdád believers take photographs of the cave in the Sargul Mountain near Sulaymáníyyih where Bahá'u'lláh spent two years in solitude. [BW2Surveyp.33, SETPE1p141] Baghdad; Sulaymaniyyih Sulaymaniyyih; Photography; Caves; Mountains; Sargul Mountain; Bahaullah, Life of
    1928 The passing of Hand of the Cause of God Mírzá 'Alí-Muhammad, known as Ibn-i-Asdaq. He was born in Mashhad in 1850/1.
  • His father was Mullá Sádiq-i-Muqaddas-i-Khursúní, referred to as a Hand of the Cause of God by 'Abdu'l-Bahá. [EM19] While still a child he suffered imprisonment with his father in Tehran.
  • He begged Bahá’u’lláh permission to be a martyr. Baha’u’llah said that if one lived right he might attain martyrdom. In 1882 Baha’u’llah conferred the station of martyr on him calling him “Shahid Ibn-i-Shahid” (“Martyr, son of the Martyr”) .”
  • He is the first of the Hands of the Cause of God named by Bahá’u’lláh.
  • ‘Abdu’l-Bahá gave him a special mission to teach members of the “ruling class” the Faith.
  • He was deeply involved in the planning and construction of the Mashriqu’l-Adhkár in ‘Ishqábád.
  • Ibn-i-Asdaq, Mírzá ‘Alí-Muhammad, Hand of the Cause of God, Apostle of Bahá’u’lláh, passes away in Tihrán. [BBD115, EM176, LoF9-12, RoB4p286]
  • For details of his life see EB171–6.
  • Tihran; Mashhad; Iran In Memoriam; Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause of God (appointments); Apostles of Bahaullah; Ibn-i-Asdaq (Mirza Ali-Muhammad); Mulla Sadiq-i- Muqaddas-i-Khursuni
    1928 11 Sep The National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of Iraq submits a petition to the Permanent Mandates Commission of the League of Nations for the return of the House of Bahá’u’lláh in Baghdád. [BW3:198–206]
  • See BA164-165 for letter from Shoghi Effendi.
  • Baghdad; Iraq Petitions; League of Nations; Bahaullah, Houses of; House of Bahaullah (Baghdad)
    1930 Apr A ceremony is held at the American annual convention in dedication of the resumption of the building activities on the Wilmette Temple. [BBRSM183; BW3:47]
    • Shoghi Effendi’s gift to the Temple is ‘the most valuable sacred possession in the Holy Land’ a ‘precious ornament of the Tomb of Bahá’u’lláh’, an exquisite Persian carpet. [BA180–1; BW4:208–12]
    Wilmette; United States annual convention; Bahai Temple; Bahaullah, Shrine of; gift; Mashriqul-Adhkar; Gifts; Carpets
    1931 The first Chinese translation of Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era is published. [PH36]
    • The translation is made by Dr Tsao Yun-siang, President of the Xinhua University in Beijing. [PH36]
    Beijing Tsao Yun-siang; Bahaullah and the New Era (book); Esslemont; First translations
    1935 The publication of Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh. [Gleanings]

    Described by Shoghi Effendi as being, "a selection of the most characteristic and hitherto unpublished passages from the outstanding works of the Author of the Bahá'í Revelation," [GBF93]

    BWC Gleanings from the Writings of Bahaullah; Bahaullah, Writings of
    1938 The publication of Prayers and Meditations of Bahá'u'lláh. [P&M] BWC Prayers and Meditations of Bahaullah (book); Bahaullah, Writings of; Prayer; Meditation
    1947 23 Sep The passing of Haji Mahmúd Qassabchí. He became a Bahá'í in 1911 after reading accounts of the travels of 'Abdu'l-Bahá in the Star of the West. After WWI he undertook the restoration of the House of Bahá'u'lláh in Baghdad. A few years later he played a leading part in the purchase and the establishment of the Hazíratu'l-Quds of Baghdad and the erection of the Haziratu'l-Quds in the village of Avashiq, the first in Iraq. His most imperishable service was the construction of three rooms at the rear of the Shrine of the Báb that were temporarily used as the International Bahá'í Archives before the construction of its permanent seat. [BW11p502-503] Baghdad; Iraq Haji Mahmud Qassabchi; In Memoriam; House of Bahaullah (Baghdad); Bab, Shrine of
    1950 (in the decade) John Z. T. Chang arrives in Hainan Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Hainan Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1950 Clifford and Catherine Huxtable arrive in the Gulf Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh (albeit in 1957 see LNW93). [BW13:457] Gulf Islands Clifford Huxtable; Catherine Huxtable; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1951 25 Jan or 4 Feb Claire Gung arrives in Tanganyika, the second Bahá’í pioneer to the country. Tanzania Knights of Bahaullah
    1951 3 Aug The establishment of the Faith in Uganda with the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. Músá Banání, Mrs. Violette and Mr. Ali Nakhjavani, of Iran, with their baby daughter Bahiyyih, and Mr. Philip Hainsworth arrived in Kampala. [Wiki Bahá'í Uganda] Kampala; Uganda; Africa Musa Banani; Violette Nakhjavani; Ali Nakhjavani; Bahiyyih Nakhjavani; Philip Hainsworth; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Dr. K. M. Fozdar on the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. [BWNS271] Andaman Island; Nicobar Island Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Edith Danielsen in the Cook Islands. [BWNS265] Cook Islands; Pacific Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 The arrival of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Dr. Mihdi Samandari and Mrs. Ursula Samandari (Newman) in Mogadishu, Somalia [BWNS230] Mogadishu; Somalia Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Katharine Meyer arrives on Margarita Island and is named Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Margarita Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 19 Mar Suhayl Samandarí arrives in Mogadishu and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for Italian Somaliland. [BW13:452]
    • Within a short time, Sa‘íd ‘Alí Masqatí, a Somali from the port of Baraawe, becomes a Bahá’í, the first person to accept the Faith in Somalia.
    Mogadishu; Italian Somaliland Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 May Mary and Reginald (Rex) Collison, an elderly Canadian-American couple, arrive in Ruanda-Urundi (Burundi) from Uganda and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455]
    • For the story of Mary Collison’s life see BW15:486–8.
    Ruanda-Urundi (Burundi) Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jun Ghulám ‘Alí Kurlawala arrives in Daman and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Daman Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jun Dunduzu Chisiza, a Nyasaland student who has recently become a Bahá’í in Uganda, arrives in Ruanda-Urundi (Burundi) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Ruanda-Urundi (Burundi) Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 6 Jun ‘Izzatu’lláh Zahrá’í (Ezzat Zahrai) arrives in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Zimbabwe; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jul Rawshan Áftábí and Fírúzih Yigánigi arrive in Goa and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Goa; India Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jul Arthur and Ethel Crane arrive in Key West and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW16:453] Key West Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jul Sa‘íd Nahví arrives in Pondicherry and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Pondicherry; India Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Jul Jack Huffman and Rose Perkal arrive on the Kodiak Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Kodiak Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Jul Jenabe and Elaine Caldwell arrive in the Aleutian Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Aleutian Islands Jenabe Caldwell; Elaine Caldwell; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Aug ‘Abbás Vakíl arrives in Cyprus and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cyprus Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Aug Shiyam Behari arrives in Pondicherry and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Pondicherry; India Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Aug Amír Húshmand Manúchihrí arrives in Liechtenstein and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Liechtenstein; Europe Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Aug Salísa Kirmání and Shírín Núrání arrive in Karikal and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Karikal Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Aug Amín and Sheila Banání, a Persian-American couple, settle in Athens-Kifissia in August 1953 and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Greece. [BW452] Athens; Greece Amin Banani; Sheila Banani; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Aug Eskil Ljungberg of Sweden, aged 67, arrives in the Faroe Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451]
    • He is the only Bahá’í on the islands for over a decade.
    • For the story of his life see BW19:658–61.
    Faroe Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Aug Edythe MacArthur arrives in the Queen Charlotte Islands (now Haida Gwaii) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Queen Charlotte Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Aug Udai Narain Singh arrives in Sikkim and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455; PH63] Sikkim; India Udai Narain Singh; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 2 Aug Fred Schechter, an American, arrives in Djibouti and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for French Somaliland. [BW13:451]
    • Mr Schechter went on to pioneer to several Latin American countries, he spent thirteen year on the Continental Board of Councillors for the Americas and served on the International Teaching Centre. He passed away on 27 January 2017 in California, U.S.A. He was 89 years old. [BWNS1149]
    French Somaliland (Djibouti); Djibouti Fred Schechter; Knights of Bahaullah; Councillors; International Teaching Centre, Members of; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1953 11 Aug Virginia Orbison arrives in the Balearic Islands from a pioneer post in Spain and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Balearic Islands. [BW13:449] Balearic Islands Virginia Orbison; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 28 Aug Mildred Clark, a pioneer in Norway, and Loyce Lawrence (née Drugan), a nurse and hospital matron, arrive in the Lofoten Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453]
    • Mrs Lawrence begins teaching the Saami.
    Lofoten Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Pioneers; Sami
    1953 Sep Brigitte Hasselblatt arrives in Shetland and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Shetland Islands; Scotland; United Kingdom Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Sep Ada Schott, Elizabeth Hopper, Sara Kenny and Ella Duffield arrive in the Madeira Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. BW13:453] Madeira Islands; Portugal; Europe Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Enayat Sohaili in Nyasaland (now known as Malawi) [BWNS240] Nyasaland; Malawi; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep Kathleen Weston arrives in the Magdalen Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Magdalen Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Sep Nellie French arrives in Monaco and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Monaco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep Julius Edwards arrives in the Northern Territories Protectorate and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Northern Territories Protectorate (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep Brigitte Lundblade (nee Hasselblatt), (b. 1923 - d. 17 May 2008) arrived in the Shetland Islands and was later honoured with being named as Knight of Bahá'u'lláh. [Bahaikipedia] Shetland Islands; Scotland; United Kingdom Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Sep Howard Snider arrives in Key West and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Key West Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep Diá’i’lláh Asgharzádih and Evelyn Baxter arrive in the Channel Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Channel Islands Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Sep Elsa Grossman arrives in the Frisian Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Frisian Islands Elsa Grossman; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Sep Hugh McKinley and his mother, Violet, arrive in Cyprus and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cyprus Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 8 Sep Jameson and Gale Bond arrive in Arctic Bay in the District of Franklin and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451, SDSC127] Arctic Bay; Franklin Jameson Bond; Gale Bond; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 9 Sep José (d. 1985) and Hilda (née Summers) Xavier Rodrigues, a Portuguese-English couple, arrive in Bissau from Portugal as the first Bahá’í pioneers to Portuguese Guinea (Guinea Bissau) and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Bissau; Portuguese Guinea (Guinea Bissau); Guinea Bissau Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 18 Sep Dwight and Carole Allen arrive in Athens and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Greece. [BW13:452] Athens; Greece Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 20 Sep The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Mr. Max Kanyerezi in Middle Congo (now called Republic of Congo) [BWNS246] Congo, Republic of; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 23 Sep Ted and Joan Anderson arrive in Whitehorse, Canada, and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Yukon. [BW13:457] Whitehorse; Canada Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 27 Sep Tábandih Paymán arrives in San Marino and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh in November. [BW13:455] San Marino Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 30 Sep Manúchihr Hizárí and Hurmuz Zindih arrive in Tangier and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Morocco (International Zone). [BW13:454] Tangier; Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Emma Rice, followed one week later by Knights Stanley and Florence Bagley and their three teenage children, Susan, Gerrold and Carol in Palermo, Sicily. [BWNS254] Sicily; Italy Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Lionel Peraji arrives in Mahé and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Mahe Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Charles Dunning arrives in the Orkney Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455]
    • In probably it was October of 1954 Harold and Marzieh Gail depart from St Matthew's Quay in Aberdeen destined to pay a visit to Charles Dunning in Kirkwall. On the island the diminutive Charles Dunning is referred to as "a wee chappie". [OPOP55-59]
    Orkney Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Geraldine Craney arrives in the Hebrides and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Hebrides Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Marie Ciocca arrives on Sardinia and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Sardinia Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Earle Render arrives in the Leeward Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Leeward Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Salvador and Adela Tormo arrive on the Juan Fernandez Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Juan Fernandez Islands; Chile Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Zunilda de Palacios arrives on Chiloé Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Chiloe Island; Chile; Latin America Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Elly Becking arrives in Dutch New Guinea and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Dutch New Guinea; Indonesia Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Gertrud Ankersmidt and Ursula von Brunn arrive in the Frisian Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Frisian Islands; Netherlands Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Frederick and Jean Allen and Irving and Grace Geary arrive on Cape Breton Island and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cape Breton Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Richard and Lois Nolen arrive in the Azores and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13p44g] Azores Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Shirley Warde arrives in British Honduras (Belize) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] British Honduras (Belize); Belize Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Dr Malcolm King, an American pioneer in Jamaica, arrives in British Guiana and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] British Guiana Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Rolf Haug settles in Crete and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for that island. [BW13:450] Crete Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Muhammad Mustafá Sulaymán, an Egyptian, arrives in Spanish Sahara (Western Sahara) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. BW13:456]
    • For the story of his life see BW18:768–71.
    Spanish Sahara (Western Sahara) Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Max Kanyerezi, a Ugandan, is brought to Brazzaville by Violette and ‘Alí Nakhjavání and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for French Equatorial Africa. [BW13:451] Brazzaville; French Equatorial Africa Violette Nakhjavani; Ali Nakhjavani; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct ‘Amín Battáh, an Egyptian, arrives in Río de Oro (Western Sahara) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Western Sahara; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Oct Bertha Dobbins arrives in Port Vila on the island of Efate from Adelaide, Australia, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the New Hebrides Islands (Vanuatu). [BW13:454] Port Vila; Efate; New Hebrides Islands (Vanuatu) Bertha Dobbins; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Jean and Tove Deleuran arrive in the Balearic Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh in December. [BW13:449] Balearic Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Mrs (Alexandra) Ola Pawlowska arrives in St Pierre and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for Miquelon Island and St Pierre Island. [BW13:454] St Pierre Island; Miquelon Island Ola Pawlowska; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Gail and Gerald Curwin and Maurice and Ethel Holmes arrive in Nassau and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Bahama Islands. [BW13:449] Nassau; Bahama Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Claire Gung arrives in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Knights of Bahaullah find reference
    1953 Oct Edmund (‘Ted’) Cardell arrives in Windhoek and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for South West Africa (Namibia). [BW13:456]
    • He is later joined by his wife Alicia and the first German Bahá’ís to pioneer to Africa, Martin and Gerda Aiff and their children.
    Windhoek; West Africa (Namibia); Namibia Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 7 Oct William Danjon Dieudonné arrives in Andorra and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW12:449]
    • He continues to live in the country.
    Andorra; Europe Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 11 Oct Fawzí Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín and his wife, Bahíyyih ‘Alí Sa‘di’d-Dín, and their sons Kamál and Sharíf arrive in Tetuán from Egypt and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Spanish Morocco. [BW13:456]
    • For the story of Fawzí Zaynu’l-‘Ábidín’s life see BW16:544–6.
    Tetuan; Spanish Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 13 Oct Una Townshend arrives in Malta and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454, BWNS234] Malta Una Townshend; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 13 Oct Esther Evans and Lillian Middlemast arrive in Castries, St Lucia, and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Windward Islands. BW13:457] Castries; St Lucia; Windward Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 13 Oct Frederick and Elizabeth Laws arrive in Basutoland (Lesotho) and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449, news.bahai.org/story/262 ]
    • For the story of the life of Elizabeth Laws see BW17:459–60.
    • Chadwick Mohapi and his wife become the first Bahá'ís in Basutoland (Lesotho). [TG166]
    Basutoland (Lesotho) Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 14 Oct Shoghi Effendi announces the settling of 13 further Knights of Bahá’u’lláh, with 178 territories now open to the Faith. [MBW173] Knights of Bahaullah; Shoghi Effendi, Life of; Statistics; Growth
    1953 14 Oct Gertrude Eisenberg arrives in Las Palmas and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Canary Islands. [BW13:450] Las Palmas; Canary Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 14 Oct Robert and Elinor Wolff arrive in Dutch Guiana and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Dutch Guiana (Suriname); Suriname Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 14 Oct Edith M. Danielsen arrives on Aitutaki Island, 150 miles north of Rarotonga, before leaving for Avarua, Rarotonga, five days later and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Cook Islands. [BW13:450]
    • For the story of her life see BW19:625–6
    .
    Cook Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Oct Enoch Olinga arrives in Victoria (Limbé) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the British Cameroons. [BW13:449]
    • The first Cameroonian to become a Bahá’í in British Cameroon is a youth, Jacob Tabot Awo.
    • The first Cameroonian adult to become a Bahá’í is Enoch Ngompek of the Bassa tribe.
    • The first Cameroonian woman to become a Bahá’í is Esther Obeu, the wife of David Tanyi.
    Victoria (Limbé); British Cameroons; Cameroon; Nigeria Enoch Olinga; Knights of Bahaullah; First Bahais by country or area
    1953 15 Oct Eberhard Friedland arrives in French Guiana from the United States and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] French Guiana Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 16 Oct Benjamin Dunham Weeden and his wife Gladys (née Anderson) arrive in Antigua and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Leeward Islands. [BW13:453]
    • For the story of Ben Weeden’s life see BW15:478–9.
    • For the story of Gladys Weeden’s life see BW18:692–6.
    Antigua; Leeward Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 17 Oct The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Bertha Dobbins in Vanuatu. [BWNS256] Vanuatu; Oceania Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 18 Oct George and Marguerite (Peggy) True arrive on Tenerif with their 12-year-old son Barry and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Canary Islands. [BW13:450] Tenerif; Canary Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 20 Oct Frances Heller arrives in Macau and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the island. [BW13:453; PH73]
    • She is the first Knight of Bahá’u’lláh to settle in Chinese territory.
    Macau Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 24 Oct Elsie Austin arrives in Tangier from the United States and Muhammad-‘Alí Jalálí, an Iranian, also arrives. They are both named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Morocco (International Zone). [BW13:454] Tangier; Morocco Elsie Austin; Muhammad-Ali Jalali; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 24 Oct Luella McKay, John and Erleta Fleming, and Alyce Janssen arrive in Spanish Morocco and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 29 Oct Opal Jensen arrives on Réunion Island from the United States and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455]
    • She is later declared a Covenant-breaker.
    Réunion Island Opal Jensen; Knights of Bahaullah; Covenant-breakers
    1953 29 Oct Gladys (‘Glad’) Irene Parke and Gretta Stevens Lamprill arrive in Papeete from Australia and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Society Islands, French Polynesia. [BW13:455]
    • For the story of Gladys Parke’s life see BW15:457–8.
    • For the story of Gretta Lamprill’s life see BW15:534–5.
    Papeete; Society Islands; French Polynesia Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Nov Mary Olga Katherine Mills (née Bieymann) arrives in Malta and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Malta Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Nov The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Kamil Abbas in the Seychelles. [BWNS272] Seychelles; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov Samíra Vakíl arrives in Cyprus and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cyprus Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Nov Dr Mihdí Samandarí arrives in Italian Somaliland and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452]
    • His wife Ursula (née Newman) arrives in 1954 and is also named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh.
    Somalia Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov Labíb Isfahání arrives in Dakar from Egypt and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for French West Africa. [BW13:452] Dakar; French West Africa Habib Isfahani; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov Dr Khodadad M. Fozdar, an Indian of Parsi background, arrives in the Andaman Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449]
    • For the story of his life see BW13:892–3.
    Andaman Islands; India Khodadad M. Fozdar; Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov Husayn Rawhání Ardikání and his wife, Nusrat, arrive in Tangier with their daughter, Shahlá, and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Morocco (International Zone). [BW13:454] Tangier; Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov ‘Alí Akbar Rafí‘í (Rafsanjání) and his wife, Sháyistih, and their 19-year-old son, ‘Abbás, arrive in Tangier and all are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Morocco (International Zone). [BW13:454] Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Nov Matthew W. Bullock of Boston, Massachusetts, arrives in the Dutch West Indies and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Dutch West Indies (Lesser Antilles); Lesser Antilles Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 11 Nov Shoghi Effendi announces the settling of a further contingent of Knights of Bahá’u’lláh in 21 virgin areas, bringing the number of territories open to the Faith to 200. [MBW52–3] Knights of Bahaullah; Shoghi Effendi, Life of; Statistics; Growth
    1953 11 Nov Ottilie Rhein (1903-79), an American of German origin, arrives in Mauritius and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the island. [BW13:454]
    • For the story of her life see BW18:703–5.
    • On her first expedition to provide necessities for living, she met the proprietor of a shop, Mr. Yim Lim, who became the first resident of the country to join the Faith. [BWNS274]
    Mauritius Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 13 Nov Kámil ‘Abbás arrives in the Seychelles from Iraq and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455]
    • For the story of his life see BW18:722–3.
    Seychelles Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Dec Kay Khusraw Dahamobedi, Bahíyyih Rawhání and Gulbár Áftábí arrive on Diu Island and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Diu Island; India Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1953 Dec Adíb Baghdádí arrives in Hadhramaut and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Hadhramaut; Yemen Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 Dec The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Labib Isfahani in Senegal. He was followed by his brother Habib Isfahani in April of 1954 who also received the honour. [BWNS283] Senegal; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1953 8 Dec Loretta and Carl Scherer arrive in Macau from Milwaukee and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for that island. [BW13:453; PH73]
    • For the stories of their lives see BW18:738–40.
    Macau Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 ‘Aynu’d-Dín and Táhirih ‘Alá’í arrive in Southern Rhodesia and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Zimbabwe Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Grace Bahovec arrives in the Baranof Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Baranof Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Feb Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle) arrives on St Thomas Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] St Thomas Island Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle); Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 The arrival in Zimbabwe (formerly Southern Rhodesia) of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Izzat'u'llah Zahrai, Douglas Kadenhe, Nura Faridian (now Steiner), Enayat and Iran Sohaili, Shidan Fat'he-Aazam (later member of the Continental Board of Counsellors for Africa) and his wife Florence. [BWNS275] Zimbabwe; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Violet Noehnke on the Admiralty Islands, now Manus Province in Papua New Guinea. [BWNS307, BWNS312] Admiralty Islands; Manus Province; Papua New Guinea Knights of Bahaullah Find date
    1954 Jan Jean Sevin arrives in Tuamotu Archipelago and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:457] Tuamotu Archipelago Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jan Charles M. Ioas arrives in the Balearic Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Balearic Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Jan The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Abdu'l Rahman Zarqani, in the Seychelles. [BWNS272] Seychelles; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jan Munír Vakíl, a former general in the Iraqi army, settles on one of the Kuria-Muria Islands in the Arabian Sea and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453]
    • For the story of the hardships of his pioneering post see ZK99–101.
    Kuria-Muria Islands; Oman Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Jan Elizabeth Bevan (later Mrs Golmohammed) arrives in Rhodes and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Rhodes Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Jan Virginia Breaks arrives on the island of Truk and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Caroline Islands. [BW13:450; MBW57] Truk; Caroline Islands Virginia Breaks; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Jan Kenneth and Roberta Christian arrive in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Kenneth Christian; Roberta Christian; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jan Andrew and Nina Matthisen arrive in the Bahamas and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Bahamas; Caribbean Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 3 Jan Howard and Joanne Menking arrive in the Cape Verde Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cape Verde Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 14 Jan Lilian E. Wyss arrives in Apia from Australia and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Samoa Islands. [BW13:455] Apia; Samoa Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 15 Jan ‘Abdu’l-Rahmán Zarqání, from India, arrives in the Seychelles and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Seychelles; Africa; India Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 18 Jan Mrs Dulcie Burns Dive arrives in the Cook Islands from Australia and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450, 925] Cook Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 25 Jan The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Dr. Stanley Bolton in Tonga. [BWNS286] Tonga Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 25 Jan Stanley P. Bolton, Jr. arrives in Nuku’alofa, on Tongatapu Island, from Australia and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for Tonga Islands. [BW13:456] Tonga Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Feb Rahmatu’lláh and Írán Muhájir arrive in Mentawai Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u‘lláh. [BW13:454]
    • For the story of their pioneering activity see Muhájir, Dr Muhajir, Hand of the Cause of God, Knight of Bahá’u’lláh.
    Mentawai Islands; Indonesia Rahmatullah Muhajir; Iran Muhajir; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Feb ‘Azízu’lláh and Shamsí Navídí arrive in Monaco and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Monaco Azizullah Navidi; Shamsi Navidi; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb Joan Powis arrives in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb Bernard H. Guhrke arrives on the Kodiak Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Kodiak Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Feb Gail Avery arrives in the Baranof Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Baranof Islands Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb John and Audrey Robarts and their son Patrick and young daughter Tina arrive in Mafikeng and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Bechuanaland (Botswana). [BW13:449] Mafikeng; Botswana John Robarts; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb David Schreiber, an American, arrives in Antigua and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Leeward Islands. [BW13:453] Antigua; Leeward Islands Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb Faríburz Rúzbihyán (Feriborz Roozbehyan) arrives in The Gambia and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Gambia, The Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb Husayn Halabi arrives in Hadhramaut and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Hadhramaut; Yemen Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 10 Feb John Leonard arrives in the Falkland Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Falkland Islands Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 15 Feb Charles Duncan (a musician) and Harry Clark, both Americans, arrive in Brunei from Kota Kinabalu (Jesselton) in Sabah, where they have been waiting for several weeks, and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451; PH63] Brunei Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 21 Feb Charles (‘Chuck’) and Mary Dayton from the United States, settle in Charlotte Amalie, on St Thomas, and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Leeward Islands. [BW13:453] Charlotte Amalie; St Thomas; Leeward Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Mar Qudratu’lláh Rawhání and Khudárahm Muzhgání arrive in Mahé and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Mahe Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Mar Olivia Kelsey and Florence Ullrich arrive in Monaco and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454]
    • See Bahá'í Chronicles for the story of the life of Florence Maria Ullrich Kelley (b. November 3, 1932 d. February 17, 2016)
    Monaco Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 1 Mar The arrival of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Alvin and Gertrude Blum in the Solomon Islands. [BWNS291] Solomon Islands; Oceania Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 1 Mar Alvin J. Blum and his wife, Gertrude (née Gewertz), arrive in Honiara and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for the Solomon Islands. They are accompanied by their eight-year-old daughter Keithie. [BW13:456] Solomon Islands; Oceania Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 4 Mar The arrival of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Elena (Marsella) and Roy Fernie in Kiribati. [BWNS301, BW13:452]

    They had left their home in Panama and their service on the National Spiritual Assembly of Panama to pioneer. They arrived on the island of Abaiang (aka Charlotte Island, of the Gilbert Islands), on March 4, 1954 and for this service they were named Knights of Baha'u'llah. About the first of June 1954, former Catholic seminarian and mission teacher Peter Kanere Koru became the first convert on the island.

    Their teaching work brought opposition from the Roman Catholic priest who told his congregation not to attend the Bahá'í meetings. He began to criticize them in the Roman Catholic newsletter and actually contributed to the knowledge of the Faith because the newsletter had a wide distribution.

    The priest persisted in his opposition by informing his bishop who asked the government to send the Fernies away and to send Peter Kanere back to his native island of Tabiteuea. At the time, to be a registered religious organization required a membership of at least 100 believers so the government approved sending the Fernies away however, in a single night some 300 people registered. A certificate of registration was issued on the 24th of September, 1955, but not before they managed to send Roy Fernie away. Elena continued the teaching work on her own and was responsible for firmly establishing the Faith on Abaiang.

    Meanwhile, Peter Kanere, back on his home island, managed to teach a Protestant minister who was under discipline of his church at the time. Together they spread the Faith on Tabiteuea. [Island Churches: Challenge and Change by Makisi Finau page 101]

    Tabiteuea; Kiribati; Oceania; Gilbert Islands Knights of Bahaullah; First Bahais by country or area cro ssreference URLs; title; title
    1954 25 Mar Leland Jensen arrives on Réunion Island from the United States and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455]
    • He is later declared a Covenant-breaker.
    Reunion Island; France Leland Jensen; Knights of Bahaullah; Covenant-breakers
    1954 28 Mar Suhráb Paymán, together with his five-year old-daughter Ghitty, arrives in San Marino from Tihrán to join his wife. He is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh in April. [BW13:455] San Marino Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Mrs Mehrangiz Munsiff pioneers to the city of Douala in the French Cameroons (later Cameroon). Both she and Mr Samuel Njiki were honoured as Knights of Bahá'u'lláh for this territory. [Bahá'í Journal UK Vol 20, No 5 Jan/Feb 2004, BW13:451] French Cameroon; Cameroon; Douala Meherangiz Munsiff; Samuel Njiki; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Dr John Fozdar arrives in Brunei in April 1954 and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Brunei John Fozdar; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr The arrival of Knight David Tanyi in Togoland (now Togo) [BWNS249] Togoland (Togo); Togo Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr The arrival of Knight Edward Tabe in British Togoland (now part of Ghana) [BWNS249] British Togoland (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Edward Tabe and Albert Buapiah arrive in British Togoland and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] British Togoland (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr The arrival of Knight Martin Manga to Northern Territories Protectorate (now part of Ghana) [BWNS249] Northern Territories Protectorate (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Benedict Eballa arrives in Ashanti Protectorate and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Ashanti Protectorate (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Martin Manga arrives in the Northern Territories Protectorate, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Northern Territories Protectorate (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Habíb Isfahání arrives in Dakar and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for French West Africa. [BW13:452] Dakar; French West Africa Habib Isfahani; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Gayle Woolson arrives in the Galapagos Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Galapagos Islands; Ecuador Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Apr Kay Zinky arrives in the Magdalen Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Magdalen Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Apr Howard Gilliland arrives in Labrador and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Labrador Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr The arrival of Knight Benedict Eballa to Ashanti Protectorate (now part of Ghana) [BWNS249] Ashanti Protectorate (Ghana); Ghana Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Samuel Njiki, the first Bahá’í of the Bamiliki tribe, arrives in French Cameroons from British Cameroons and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. French Cameroon; Cameroon Samuel Njiki; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Corporal Richard Walters and his wife, Evelyn, and Richard and Mary L. Suhm arrive in Tangier from the United States and are all named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Morocco (International Zone). BW13:454] Tangier; Morocco Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr John and Marjorie Kellberg of Oak Park, Illinois, arrive in the Dutch West Indies and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Dutch West Indies Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Apr Robert B. Powers, Jr., a member of the U.S. armed forces at the Navy Air Station, arrives in Guam and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Mariana Islands. [BW13:454] Guam; Mariana Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 11 Apr Bula Mott Stewart arrives in Swaziland and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Swaziland Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 13 Apr David Tanyi, a tailor, arrives in French Togoland from British Cameroons and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] French Togoland (Togo); Togo Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 18 Apr John and Valera Allen arrive in Swaziland and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Swaziland Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 21 Apr Bruce Matthew arrives at Goose Bay and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for Labrador. [BW13:453] Goose Bay; Labrador; Canada Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 May Elinore Putney arrives in the Aleutian Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u‘lláh. [BW13:449] Aleutian Islands; Alaska; United States; Russia Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 May Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle) arrives in Bata, the capital of Rio Muni, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for a second time, this time for Spanish Guinea. [BW13:456] Equatorial Guinea Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle); Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 May Haig Kevorkian arrives in the Galápagos Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452] Galapagos Islands; Ecuador Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 2 May The arrival of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Mavis Nymon and Vivian Wesson in French Togoland (now called Togo). [BWNS329 ] French Togoland (Togo); Togo Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 2 May Cynthia R. Olson of Wilmington, Delaware, settles in Barrigada, the largest village in Guam, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Mariana Islands. [BW13:454] Barrigada; Guam; Mariana Islands; Oceania Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 2 May Mavis Nymon and Vivian Wesson, both Americans, arrive in French Togoland and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:451] Togo; Africa Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 4 May Elizabeth Stamp, an Irish-American widow from New York City, arrives in St Helena and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] St Helena Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 5 May Sabrí and Fahima (Ra’isa) Elias, an Egyptian couple with four children, arrive in Djibouti and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for French Somaliland. [BW13:451] French Somaliland (Djibouti); Djibouti Sabri Elias; Raissa Elias; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 17 May The arrival of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Elise Lynelle (then Schreiber) in Bata, Spanish Guinea, now Equatorial Guinea. [BWNS330] Bata; Spanish Guinea; Equatorial Guinea Elise Schreiber (later Lynelle); Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jun Harold and Florence Fitzner arrive in Portuguese Timor and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Portuguese Timor; East Timor Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jun Louise Groger arrives on Chiloé Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Chiloe Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 Jun Shawqí Riyád Rawhání (Shoghi Riaz Rouhani), an Iranian from Egypt, arrives in Las Palmas and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Canary Islands. [BW13:450] Las Palmas; Canary Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 24 Jun Shápúr Rawhání and Ardishír Furúdí, Iranian residents of India, arrive in Bhutan by foot and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. They spent about two months in Bhutan. However, circumstances did not permit them to remain longer in Bhutan and they had to return to India. [BW13:449]
    • They are accompanied to the Bhutan border by the prime minister of Bhutan, Jigme Dorji.
    • In about 1961 Dr. Anayat Soroosh Yaganagi, a Bahá'í of Zoroastrian background from Bangalore pioneered to Bhutan. See the brief history of his family and the development of the Faith in the country in "Bahá'í Recollections" written by one of his daughters, Geeti Yaganegi.
    Bhutan; India Shapur Rawhani; Ardishir Furudi; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jul José Marques arrives in Portuguese Timor and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:455] Portuguese Timor; East Timor Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jul Dr John George Mitchell, an English physician who became a Bahá’í in 1950, arrives in Malta and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Malta Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 5 Jul Violet Hoehnke, an Australian, arrives in Papua New Guinea and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Admiralty Islands. [BW13:449] Papua New Guinea; Admiralty Islands Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 12 Jul The arrival of Knights of Bahá'u'lláh Dudley Moore Blakely and his wife Elsa (Judy) Blakeley in Tonga. They shared the honour with Dr. Stanley Bolton. [BWNS286] Tonga Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 12 Jul Dudley Moore Blakely, an artist, sculptor and designer, and his wife, Elsa (‘Judy’), British citizens living in Maine, arrive on Tongatapu and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Tonga Islands. [BW13:456] Tonga Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 7 Aug Marcia Steward de Matamoros Atwater arrives in the Marshall Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454] Marshall Islands Marcia Atwater; Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 28 Aug Mihribán Suhaylí (Mehraban Sohaili) arrives on the Comoro Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Comoro Islands Mihriban Suhayli (Mehraban Sohaili); Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1954 1 Oct Anthony and Mamie Seto arrive in Hong Kong. Hong Kong; Asia Knights of Bahaullah find reference
    1954. 22 Oct Mr and Mrs Suleimani arrive by ship in Keelung, Taiwan. Keelung; Taiwan Knights of Bahaullah find reference
    1955 Mar Kamálí Sarvístání arrives on Socotra Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Socotra Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1955 4 Jun Frank Wyss of Australia arrives on Cocos and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:450] Cocos Knights of Bahaullah
    1955 Sep Travelling by foot, Udai Narain Singh arrives in Tibet from Gangtok, Sikkim., and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh, his second such distinction.
    • He is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh in spring 1956. [BW13:456]
    Tibet; Sikkim; India Udai Narain Singh; Knights of Bahaullah
    1955 Oct Daniel Haumont arrives in the Loyalty Islands and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:453] Loyalty Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1956 May Mary Zabolotny (later Mrs Ken McCulloch), of Polish background, arrives on Anticosti Island, Canada, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:449] Anticosti Island; Canada Knights of Bahaullah
    1957 May Pouva Murday of Mauritius arrives in the Chagos Archipelago and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. Chagos Archipelago Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1957 Jul Margaret Bates and her daughter Jean Frankel of the United States arrive in the Nicobar Islands and are named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:454; PH63] Nicobar Islands Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1957 6 Sep Shoghi Effendi announces ‘the complete evacuation of the remnant of Covenant-breakers and the transfer of all their belongings from the precincts of the Most Holy Shrine’. [MBW124]
    • See VSE166 for Audrey Robarts' observation of the Covenant-breakers at Bahjí during her pilgrimage in 1955.
    ‘Akka Bahji; Covenant-breakers; Bahaullah, Shrine of
    1958 26 Jun Paul Adams, from Reading, England, having obtained permission to accompany Svalbard’s chief hunter on a fishing tour in the summer and to spend the winter with him in Sassen Fjord, arrives Spitzbergen and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456]
    • See also Adams, Arctic Island Hunter.
    Spitzbergen Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1959 The mansion at Mazra‘ih is renovated. [MC219] ‘Akka Mazraih; Bahaullah, Houses of; Restoration
    1959 The House of ‘Abbúd is renovated and restored. [MC219] ‘Akka House of Abbud; Bahaullah, Houses of; Restoration
    1959 18 Aug Cheong Siu Choi (John Z. T. Chang), the Chinese headmaster of the Leng Nam Middle School and a highly respected leader in Macau, arrives with his family on Hainan Island and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:452]
    • PH75 says this was August 1958.
    Hainan Island Knights of Bahaullah; Islands
    1959 19 Oct The Hands of the Cause announce that the remains of the father of Bahá’u’lláh, Mírzá Buzurg, have been reinterred in the Bahá’í burial ground in the vicinity of the Most Great House in Baghdád. [MC165] Baghdad; Iraq House of Bahaullah (Baghdad); Mirza Buzurg
    1962 Apr Virginia Breaks, Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for the Caroline Islands, moves to Saipan, the first pioneer to the area. Saipan Virginia Breaks; Knights of Bahaullah; Pioneers
    1965 11 Nov The Universal House of Justice announces that the ‘final step’ in the ‘process’ of the ‘purification’ of the Bahá’í properties in Bahjí has been taken with the removal of the remains of the Covenant-breaker Mírzá Díyá’u’lláh from the immediate precincts of the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW14:82–3] ‘Akka Bahji; Covenant-breakers; Mirza Diyaullah; Bahaullah, Shrine of
    1967 The Universal House of Justice published a compilation of Bahá'u'lláh's messages titled The Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh to the Kings and Leaders of the World to mark the 100th anniversary of the inception of that proclamation. Bahá'í institutions worldwide were asked to present the book to the leaders of government in their respective countries. Some 140 Heads of State received a copy. [MUHJ63-86p113] BWC Proclamation of Bahaullah (book); Tablets to kings and rulers; Bahaullah, Writings of
    1967 Ridván The Universal House of Justice calls upon the Bahá’ís to launch a global campaign proclaiming the message of Bahá’u’lláh to every stratum of society. A special edition of The Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh is to be presented to Heads of State. [BW14:211, Ridván 1967] BWC; Haifa Universal House of Justice; Proclamation of Bahaullah (book)
    1967. 25 Dec The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Charles Dunning (b.27 March, 1885 need Leeds). [BW14p305-308] Cardiff; Wales; United Kingdom Knights of Bahaullah; Charles Dunning; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1970 The House of Bahá’u’lláh in Tihrán undergoes major repair and a fundamental restoration of both exterior and interior parts. Tihran; Iran House of Bahaullah (Tihran); Restoration
    1972 17 Dec The passing of Matthew Bullock (b. 11 September, 1881 in Dabney, North Carolina) in Detroit, Michigan.
    • He was a singer, a talented athlete, a football coach, a teacher, a soldier, a war hero, a civic leader, a church leader.
    • Lawyer-graduated from Harvard Law School in 1907.
    • Found the Faith in 1940 after many years of careful investigation.
    • Husband to Katherine Wright, (d. 1945), father to Matthew W. Bullock Jr (a judge) and Julia Gaddy (librarian).
    • Chairman of the Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Boston.
    • Travel teacher to Haiti, Costa Rica, Mexico, Belgian Congo, Liberia.
    • Elected to the National Spiritual Assembly of the the United States in 1952.
    • Represented the NSA at the first Intercontinental Bahá'í Conference in Uganda, East and received permission to visit the Holy Land on pilgrimage prior to attending the Conference.
    • Became a Knight of Bahá'u'lláh in 1953 for Dutch West Indies when he and four other members of the NSA resigned to take up pioneer posts.
    • He received an honorary degree from Harvard in recognition of the lifetime of achievements.
    • He spent his last years in Detroit in the care of his daughter. [BW15p535-539]
    Dabney; NC; Detroit; MI In Memoriam; Matthew Bullock; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
    1974 11 Sep Annemarie Krüger, a German citizen and a granddaughter of Dr Auguste Forel, arrives in Moldavia (then the Moldavian Soviet Socialist Republic, a part of USSR) on the first of her teaching trips to Chisinau as a tourist.
    • In 1985 she is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh by the Universal House of Justice, although she never lived in the country. [Candle9 28 July, 2008]
    Moldavia Knights of Bahaullah
    1978 The publication of Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh Revealed after the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. [TRAKA]

    Sixteen Tablets revealed by Bahá’u’lláh during the later years of His life, including the Tablet of Carmel, the Book of the Covenant, and the Tablet of Wisdom, as well as excerpts from other Writings. Six of the tablets in this volume were translated into English and published in 1917. The translations were improved upon by Shoghi Effendi, and those not translated by him were filled in with the publication in 1978 under the supervision of the Universal House of Justice. [wikipedia]

    BWC Tablets of Bahaullah Revealed after the Kitab-i-Aqdas (book); Bahaullah, Writings of
    1978 Ridvan Delegates to the International Convention attend a ceremony to further dedicate the new building for the Seat of the Universal House of Justice. The superstructure of the building is completed at this stage. Chairing the event is Hand of the Cause Dr. Ugo Giachery with special guest Ethel Revell, former member of the International Bahá'í Council in attendance. A casket containing dust from both Holy Shrines is placed in a niche specially designed for it.
    • Delegates from 123 National/Regional Assemblies attended. {BW17p293-300]
    BWC; Haifa Universal House of Justice, Seat; Bahaullah, Shrine of; Bab, Shrine of; Caskets containing dust
    1978 23 Dec Helmut Winkelbach, a German Bahá’í, arrives in Bobrujsk, Belarus, and is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [Ela-D Committee of Germany Records] Bobrujsk; Belarus Helmut Winkelbach; Knights of Bahaullah
    1979 16 Sep Enoch Olinga—Hand of the Cause of God and Knight of Bahá’u’lláh—his wife and three of his children are murdered in Kampala, Uganda. (b.24 June, 1926) [BBD 172; BW18:633]
    • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the third contingent on the 2nd of October, 1957. [MoCxxiii]
    • For his obituary see BW18:618–35.
    Kampala; Uganda Enoch Olinga; Hands of the Cause; Knights of Bahaullah; In Memoriam; Appointment Hand - Third Contingent
    1979 29 Dec Rahmatu’lláh Muhájir, Hand of the Cause of God and Knight of Bahá’u’lláh, passes away in Quito, Ecuador. (b. 1923) [BW18:486, 651]
    • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the third contingent on the 2nd of October, 1957. [MoCxxiii]
    • For his obituary see BW18:651–9.
    • See also Muhájir, Dr Muhajir: Hand of the Cause of God, Knight of Bahá’u’lláh.
    Quito; Ecuador Rahmatullah Muhajir; Hands of the Cause; Knights of Bahaullah; In Memoriam; Appointment Hand - Third Contingent
    1981 23 May Helmut Winkeibach, Knight of Bahá’u’lláh for Belarus, marries Olga Grigorevna Dolganova, a Russian, their wedding ceremony being the first Bahá’í wedding in the Soviet Union. Soviet Union Helmut Winkelbach; Olga Grigorevna Dolganova; Knights of Bahaullah; Firsts, Other
    1985 Annemarie Krüger, who began travelling to Moldavia to teach the Bahá’í Faith in 1974, is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh by the Universal House of Justice, although she never lived in the country. Moldavia Annemarie Krüger; Knights of Bahaullah; Travel teaching
    1988 Apr The House of Abdu'lláh Páshá is open for the Bahá'ís to visit for the first time on the occasion of the Sixth International Convention. [ARG61-62] Haifa House of Abdullah Pasha; Bahaullah, Houses of
    1989 Jul Sean Hinton, the first Bahá’í to reside in Mongolia, is named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh by the Universal House of Justice. Mongolia Sean Hinton; Knights of Bahaullah
    1990 24 Mar Mr. and Mrs. Abbas Katirai opened the Sakhalin Islands and became Knights of Bahá'u'lláh after 35 years of pioneering in Japan. This last goal was achieved 37 years after the Guardian had designated it as a goal of the Ten Year Crusade. [DM345] [AWH73] [VV112] Sakhalin Island; Russia; Japan Knights of Bahaullah
    1990 Ridván Abbas and Rezvanieh Katirai became the last Knights of Bahá'u'lláh to be named when they pioneered to Sakhalin Island, the last remaining territory named by Shoghi Effendi in his Ten Year Crusade. [Russia by Moojan Momen] Sakhalin Island; Russia; Japan Knights of Bahaullah
    1991 18 Jun The passing of Hand of the Cause of God, Knight of Bahá'u'lláh, John Aldham Robarts at Rawdon, Quebec. He was born in Waterloo, Ontario 2nd of November, 1901. [VV124]
    • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the third contingent on the 2nd of October, 1957. [MoCxxiii]
    • Bahá’í World, Vol. 20, 1986-1992, “In Memoriam,” pp. 801-9.
    • For his obituary see BINS250:10.
    • For picture see VV124.
    • For the story of how he came to learn of the Faith see SBR137.
    Rawdon; Quebec Hands of the Cause; Knights of Bahaullah; John Robarts; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1992 The publication of the statement entitled "Bahá'u'lláh”, prepared by the Office of Public Information at the Bahá'í World Centre. The statement was formally release at a press conference in Bombay, India by Hassan Sabri. [VV126] Bombay; India Office of Public; Hassan Sabri; Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Life of (documents)
    1992 27 – 30 May Thirty thousand Bahá'ís representing approximately 200 countries and territories, gather at the Bahá'í World Centre to mark the Centenary of the Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh. [BINS271:1–2; BW92–3:96–8, 121]
    • For pictures see BINS271:10 and BW92–3:97.
    On the 27th of May...the gathering of one hundred thirteen Knights of Bahá'u'lláh along with 19 representatives of every National Spiritual Assembly (165) and 9 representatives of every territory without a National Spiritual Assembly (40-50) at Bahjí in commemoration of the ascension of Bahá'u'lláh (some 3,000 persons). A scroll bearing the Roll of Honour of the Knights of Bahá'u'lláh was deposited at the entrance door of the inner Sanctuary of the Most Holy Shrine. [AWH90 105] [VV128] [BW92-3p98] [BINS271:1]

    BWC; Haifa Bahaullah, Ascension of; Bahaullah, Shrine of; Holy days
    1992 28 May The original scroll bearing the Roll of Honour of the Knights of Bahá'u'lláh is placed by Hand of the Cause Amatu'l-Bahá Rúhíyyih Khánum in a chamber at the entrance door of the inner sanctuary of the Most Holy Shrine. [AWH90, 105; BINS271:1; BW92–3, 98; VV128]
    • For pictures see BINS271:9 and VV127, 128.
    Bahji Knights of Bahaullah; Shrine of Bahallah; Roll of Honour; Scrolls
    1992 May 29 The Commemoration of the Centenary of the Ascension of Bahá'u'lláh at Bahjí and the walk from the German Settlement to the Shrine of the Báb, the circumambulation of the Shrine and the walk to the Seat of the Universal House of Justice for the viewing of a projected portrait of Bahá'u'lláh, and a candle-lit programme of prayers and readings. The 3 a.m. observances circled the globe in some 71,000 localities with prayers and readings beginning in the Eastern Pacific Ocean time zone and going west. At 1PM in the Seat of the Universal House of Justice, there was a viewing of the passport photo of Bahá'u'lláh taken in 1868. [BINS271:1–2; BW92–3:96–7; VV129–30, SDSC367-368]
    • For the tribute to Bahá'u'lláh by the Universal House of Justice see BW92–3:31–6.
    • For pictures see BINS271:10 and VV129, 130.
    World Centre; BWC Bahaullah, Shrine of; Bab, Shrine of; Centenaries; Bahaullah, Ascension of; Holy days
    1992 May 29 The Chamber of Deputies of the government of Brazil paid homage to Bahá’u’lláh. [Bahá'í Newsreel Volume 3 Number 2] [UHJMessage 30Mar92]
    • The tribute to Bahá'u'lláh was paid at a plenary session of that body and following that session members joined Post Office officials in the formal launching of a commemorative postage stamp. [VV133]
    Brazil Bahaullah, Passing of; Holy Years; Stamps
    1993 15 Apr The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Stanley Bagley, (b.2 February, 1912). He had been a pioneer Belgium, France, Guadeloupe, Martinique, the United States as well as Sicily where he and his family received the Knighthood for their service. [BW93-94p319] USA In Memoriam; Stanley Bagley; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
    2000 22 Aug The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Audrey Robarts (née FitzGerald) in her 96th year. She is buried with her husband, Hand of the Cause of God John Robarts, in the Ecumenical Cemetery in Rawdon who predeceased her on the 18th of June, 1991. Rawdon,Quebec Audrey Robarts; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths; In Memoriam
    2002 1 May The publication of The Summons of the Lord of Hosts, by Bahá'í World Centre Publications. The 272-page book contains authoritative English translations of six major works written by Bahá'u'lláh between 1868 and 1870. Collectively, the works clearly enunciate Bahá'u'lláh's claim to prophethood to the the monarchs and religious leaders of His time and He invites them to accept the basic tenets of His Faith; sets forth the nature of His mission; and establishes the standard of justice to which those entrusted with civil authority should adhere. Among the leaders specifically addressed by Baha'u'llah were Napoleon III, Czar Alexander II, Queen Victoria, Nasiri'd-Din Shah, and Pope Pius IX. [BWNS163] BWC BWC; Summons of the Lord of Hosts (book); Bahaullah, Writings of; Tablets to kings and rulers
    2002 1 May The publication of The Summons of the Lord of Hosts. The 272-page book contains authoritative English translations of six major works written by Bahá'u'lláh in the latter half of the 19th century. Collectively, the works clearly enunciates His claim to prophethood and offers a prescription for peaceful and just leadership in the modern world.
    • Specifically, the book collects the Súriy-i-Haykal [Súrih of the Temple], Súriy-i-Ra’ís [Súrih of the Chief], Lawh-i-Ra'is [Tablet of the Chief], Lawh-i-Fu'ad [Tablet to Fu'ad Pasha], Lawh-i-Sultan [Tablet to the Shah of Iran], and Súriy-i-Mulúk [Súrih of the Kings]. [One Country Vol.14 Issue 1]
    BWC Summons of the Lord of Hosts (book); Bahaullah, Writings of; Tablets to kings and rulers
    2002 26 Jun The announcement by the Universal House of Justice of the publication of Gems of Divine Mysteries in English. Some 82-pages in English, the volume was originally titled Javahiru'l-Asrar, and was written in Arabic during Bahá'u'lláh 's banishment to Iraq, where He was exiled from 1853 until 1863. The book is a letter written in reply to a seeker who asked about the relationship of prophecy to the Babi Faith, and Bahá'u'lláh used that question as an opportunity to elaborate a number of related subjects. The book relates closely to two other major works of Bahá'u'lláh: The Seven Valleys (Haft-Vadi), an exposition on the progression of the soul, and The Book of Certitude (Kitab-i-Iqan). [BW'02-‘03pg37, BWNS174]
    • The volume was originally titled Javahiru'l-Asrar, and was written in Arabic during Bahá'u'lláh's residence in Iraq. [One Country Vol.14 Issue 2]
    BWC Javahirul-Asrar (Gems of Divine Mysteries); Bahaullah, Writings of; Translation
    2003 3 Mar The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Una Dean, née Townshend, in Edmonton, Canada. Una lived a full life of Bahá'í service. In 1946 she was the first Bahá'í in Dublin and was later a member of the first spiritual assembly. She also helped to form the first spiritual assembly in Liverpool. In October 1953 she was the first Bahá'i in Malta, a goal of the Ten Year Crusade. In 1954 she returned to Ireland to tend to her ailing father and to assist him in writing Christ and Bahá'u'lláh. After his passing in 1957 she moved to America, met and married her husband, Dick Dean, and moved to Edmonton where she served on the Local Assembly until 1987. [BW02-03p169] Edmonton; Alberta; Canada; Malta; Ireland; Liverpool; Dublin Una Dean; Una Townshend; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths; In Memoriam
    2004 2 Apr The passing of Ola Pawlowska in Newfoundland, Canada. Knight of Bahá'u'lláh for St. Pierre and Miquelon, translator of the Writings (into Polish, Pioneer to Poland, Luxembourg and Congo (30 years), Auxiliary Board Member. [BW'03-‘04pg236, BWNS248] Newfoundland; Canada; St. Pierre and Miquelon; Poland; Luxembourg; Cong Knights of Bahaullah; Ola Pawlowska
    2006 31 Jul The announcement of the publication of The Tabernacle of Unity. This publication of the Bahá'í World Centre contains five tablets - letters - written by Bahá'u'lláh to individuals of Zoroastrian background in the 1800s. As such, these tablets provide important insights into the interrelatedness of religion. [BWNS466] BWC Tabernacle of Unity (book); Zoroastrianism; Bahaullah, Writings of; Interfaith dialogue; Manikchi Limji Hataria
    2007. 1 Jun The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Jameson (Jamie) Bond (b. 6 November, 1917 Toronto, ON) in Duncan, BC. [SDSC262, 387-388, 406]
    • See Sole Desire Service Cause An Odyssey of Bahá'í Service: Gale and Jameson Bond by Don Brown for a biography.
    Toronto; Duncan; BC Jamie Bond; In Memoriam; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
    2007 7 Nov The launch of a new website by the Bahá'í International Community, The Life of Bahá'u'lláh to provide illustration of Baha'u'llah's life through photographs of places and artifacts and relics associated directly with Him. [BWNS586] Websites - Official; Internet; Bahaullah, Life of (documents); Bahaullah, Life of
    2008 8 Jul The Shrine of the Báb and the Resting Place of Baháu'lláh chosen as UNESCO World Heritage sites. [BWNS642, BWNS643] Haifa; Israel; Akka; BWC UNESCO; World Heritage Sites; Bahaullah, Shrine of; Bab, Shrine of
    2009. 14 Apr The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Gale Bond, née Keass (b. 13 November, 1919 in Emod, Hungary) in Cowichan, BC. [SDSC397]
    • See Sole Desire Service Cause An Odyssey of Bahá'í Service: Gale and Jameson Bond by Don Brown for a biography.
    Emod; Hungary; Cowichan; BC Gale Bond; In Memoriam; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths
    2015 21 Mar The implementation of the Badí' Calendar on the first day of the ten Váhid of the first Kull-i-Shay’ of the Bahá’í Era.

    "Báb introduced the calendar and its broad pattern of periods and cycles, months and days. Bahá’u’lláh provided essential clarifications and additions. Aspects were elucidated by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, and arrangements for its adoption in the West were put in place at the direction of Shoghi Effendi, as described in the volumes of The Bahá’í World. Still, ambiguities surrounding some Islamic and Gregorian dates, as well as difficulties in the correlation of historical observances and astronomical events with explicit statements in the Text, left certain issues unresolved. When responding to questions concerning the calendar, both ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi left these matters to the Universal House of Justice. Of its many features, three require clarification for the calendar’s uniform application: the means for the determination of Naw-Rúz, the accommodation of the lunar character of the Twin Holy Birthdays within the solar year, and the fixing of the dates of the Holy Days within the Badí‘ calendar." [Message from the Universal House of Justice dated 10 July, 2014] (notes below extracted from the message)

    The Festival of Naw-Rúz: The birthplace of the Abhá Beauty, will be the spot on the earth that will serve as the standard for determining, by means of astronomical computations from reliable sources, the moment of the vernal equinox in the northern hemisphere and thereby the day of Naw-Rúz for the Bahá’í world.

    The Festivals of the Twin Birthdays: They will now be observed on the first and the second day following the occurrence of the eighth new moon after Naw-Rúz. This will result in the observance of the Twin Birthdays moving, year to year, within the months of Mashíyyat, ‘Ilm, and Qudrat of the Badí‘ calendar, or from mid-October to mid-November according to the Gregorian calendar.

    The dates of the Holy Days are: Naw-Rúz, 1 Bahá; the Festival of Riḍván, 13 Jalál to 5 Jamál; the Declaration of the Báb, 8 ‘Aẓamat; the Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh, 13 ‘Aẓamat; the Martyrdom of the Báb, 17 Raḥmat; the Day of the Covenant, 4 Qawl; and the Ascension of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, 6 Qawl. These dates have been fixed within the solar calendar in accordance with explicit statements of Bahá’u’lláh, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, and Shoghi Effendi. [Message from the Universal House of Justice dated 10 July, 2014]

    Badi' calendar; Bahaullah, Birth of; Bab, Birth of; Naw-Ruz; Holy days; Gradual implementation of laws; Laws
    2016 7 May The passing of Jenabe Esslemont Caldwell, 89 in Wailuku, Hawaii. (b. August 7, 1926 in Butte, Montana). He and his wife Elaine were named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for pioneering to the Aleutian Islands in July, 1953 where they started a king crab and salmon cannery. They sponsored the Bahá’í­ singing group Windflower that toured Europe, including the United Kingdom, in the 1980s. He was the author of the books: The Story of the Bab & Baha'u'llah,From Night to Knight, Follow the Instructions and Reflections. He is well-known for his mass teaching successes. [Bahaikipedia] Butte; Montana; Aleutian Islands; Wailuku; Hawaii. Jenabe Caldwell; Elaine Caldwell; Knights of Bahaullah; Windflower (singing group); Mass teaching
    2017 18 Jan The announcement of the publication of Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Baha'u'llah for Baha'i Holy Days by the Bahá'í World Centre. It is also made available in electonic format from Bahá’í Reference Library at Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Baha'u'llah for Baha'i Holy Days. [BWNS1148] BWC Days of Remembrance (book); Holy days; Bahaullah, Writings of
    2017. 18 Oct The release of the film "Light to the World". The 51 minute film tells the story of Baha’u’llah’s remarkable life and the impact of His teachings on communities around the world. [BWNS1208] BWC Light to the World; Film; Documentaries; Life of Bahaullah; - Institute process
    2017 20 - 22 Oct From the time of the setting of the sun on October 21st in Kiribati, an island republic in the Central Pacific just west of the International Date Line, until sunset in Hawaii on the 22nd of October, 72 hours later, celebrations were held in thousands of localities throughout the world commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Bahá'u'lláh.

    Coverage on the bicentenary website began soon after 8:00 GMT on 20 October and concluded at 4:00 GMT on 23 October documenting some of the thousands of celebrations. [BWNS1201, BWNS1203, BWNS1205, BWNS1206, BWNS1207, BWNS1208, BWNS1209, BWNS1210, BWNS1211, BWNS1221, BWNS1213, BWNS1214, BWNS1216, BWNS1218]

    217 countries and territories Bahaullah, Birth of; Twin Holy days; Holy days
    2017 22 Oct The bicentenary of the birth of Bahá'u'lláh is commemorated around the world. A multi-lingual web page is implemented to track the celebrations. [BWNS1212] BWC Bahaullah, Birth of; Twin Holy days; Holy days; Bahaullah, Life of
    2017 22 Oct Yemeni security forces raided a Baha’i gathering in Sana’a opening fire on the small group of people assembled to commemorate the bicentenary of the birth of Baha’u’llah. The attack occurred in the family home of prominent tribal leader Walid Ayyash, who had been abducted in April and whose whereabouts were unknown. The attackers were reportedly in four cars and an armored vehicle which they used to break down the front door of the house. They arrested Mr. Ayyash’s brother, Akram Ayyash.

    This event proved unequivocally the extent of Iran’s role in the persecution of the Baha’is in Yemen, especially in Sana’a, which is under the control of Iranian-backed militias. Similar attacks occurred in Iran during the period of celebration of the bicentennial of the birth of Bahá'úlláh. [BWNS1215]

    Sanaa; Yemen; Iran Persecution; Birth of Bahaullah

    from the main catalogue

    1. 1867 Petition from Bahá'ís in Shushtar, Iran, to the U.S. Congress, An, in World Order, 37:3 (2006). A petition sent by Bahá'ís in Persia in 1867 to the US Consulate general, seeking assistance in getting Baha'u'llah released from imposed exile. Includes introduction, prepared on behalf of the US NSA. [about]
    2. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Description of His Father, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2006). [about]
    3. America and the Most Great Peace interactive study guide, by Duane Troxel (2004). A PDF interactive study guide to Shoghi Effendi's letter "America and the Most Great Peace," which was published in World Order of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    4. Aqa Husayn Ashchi's narrative, by Universal House of Justice and Ahang Rabbani (1996). A letter to the House requesting permission to translate and publish Aqa Husayn Ashchi's narrative and their response. [about]
    5. Archives, Bahá'í: Preserving and Safeguarding the Sacred Texts, by Universal House of Justice, in Andalib, 12:48 (1993). Includes estimated numbers of Tablets revealed, and numbers of Tablets archived at the Baha'i World Center; prepared by the Archives Office on behalf of the House. [about]
    6. Asking Questions: A Challenge to Fundamentalism and The Secret of our Century: Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani: Reviews, by Cybele Sohrab, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 3:1 (1993). [about]
    7. "At Dawn the Friend came to my bed': An Early Fruit of the Supreme Pen, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A quasidih, a dialogue between the Beloved and the Poet as a lover. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
    8. Background and Centrality of Apophatic Theology in Bábí and Bahá'í Scripture, The, by Stephen Lambden, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions vol. 8 (1997). History of the theological position of the incomprehensibility-unknowability of God in past major Abrahamic religions and its importance and significance for contemporary Bahá'ís. [about]
    9. Bahá'í Faith in Iran, The, by John Walbridge, in Essays and Notes on Babi and Bahá'í History (2002). Includes essay "Three Clerics and a Prince of Isfahan: background to Bahá'u'lláh's Epistle to the Son of the Wolf" and bios of Ayatollah Khomeini and Zill al-Sultan. [about]
    10. Bahá'í Faith in the Arabic Speaking Middle East, The: Part 1 (1753-1863), by Ramsey Zeine, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
    11. Bahá'í Perspective on the Origin of Matter, A, by Keven Brown, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:3 (1990). The origin of matter is spiritual. Science sees that, at its most fundamental level, reality is not particular materials or structures, but probabilities and transformation. The four elements, three-fold structure of being, and balance are also examined. [about]
    12. Bahá'í Revelation, The, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Passages from Fire and Light and Selections from the Writings of the Bab published in Baha'i World as a section titled "Part One: The Baha'i Revelation." [about]
    13. Bahá'í Shrines, by John Walbridge, in Encyclopaedia Iranica, Volume 3 (1989). [about]
    14. Bahá'í Teachings, Aspects of, by Universal House of Justice (1997). Authenticity of Statements; Mathnavi; Quranic quotations; Marriage Prayer; 'Sun' and 'Moon'; Hands of the Cause; Night of Power; Khatt-i-Badi; Sarcophagus for Baha'u'llah; International Baha'i Library Building; Lunar Calendar and Holy Days; Leiden, Kings. [about]
    15. Baha'u'llah: The Desire of the World, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1982). Materials for the contemplation of God and His Manifestation for this day, compiled from the Words of Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    16. Bahá'u'lláh: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1990). A very brief introduction to the Person of Baha'u'llah and some of His teachings. [about]
    17. Baha'u'llah, by Anonymous, in World Religions: Belief, Culture, and Controversy (2011). [about]
    18. Baha'u'llah and the New Era, by John E. Esslemont (1980). The classic introductory text on the Baha'i Faith focusing on Baha'i teachings and the lives of the Bab, Baha'u'llah, and Abdu'l-Baha. [about]
    19. Bahá'u'lláh's Four Tablets to Maryam, by Gloria Yazdani, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Translations of Lawh-i-Maryam "Tablet for Cousin Maryam," Maryama Isiy-i-Jan "Tablet for Maryam on Sorrow and Love," Hurufat-i-‘Ali’in "Exalted Letters," and Ziyárat-Námih-i-Maryam "Tablet of Visitation for Maryam." [about]
    20. Bahá'u'lláh's Lawh-i Haqqu'n-Nas: Tablet of the Right of the People, Provisional Translation, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). [about]
    21. Baha'u'llah's Notes to His "Ode of the Dove", by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    22. Baha'u'llah's passport, with translation, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 9 (1940-1944) (1945). Baha'u'llah's passport at the time of His exile from Iran, 1853, with translation of text. [about]
    23. Bahá'u'lláh's Persian Poems Written before 1863, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Overview of the mystical early writings of Baha'u'llah, 1852-1863. Includes extensive bibliography, and a brief summary of each of the major works from this period. [about]
    24. Baha'u'llah's prophetology: Archetypal patterns in the lives of the founders of the world religions, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 5.1 (1995). Explores the theory that the lives of the prophet-founders of the world religions have in some ways re-capitulated each other. [about]
    25. Bahá'u'lláh, A Brief Life: The Word Made Flesh, by Hasan M. Balyuzi (1963). Two long essays on the life of Baha'u'llah, published in conjunction with the Baha'i Centennial (1963): "Baha'u'llah: A Brief Life," followed by an essay on the Manifestation, "The Word Made Flesh." [about]
    26. Baha'u'llah, birth and ascension of, by J. Gordon Melton, in World Religions: Belief, Culture, and Controversy (2011). [about]
    27. Bahá'u'lláh, Birth/Ascension of, by Christopher Buck and J. Gordon Melton, in Religions of the World: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Beliefs and Practices, Vol. 1, ed. Gordon Melton & Martin Baumann (2010). [about]
    28. Bahá'u'lláh, Festival of the Birth of (November 12), by Christopher Buck and J. Gordon Melton, in Religious Celebrations: An Encyclopedia of Holidays, Festivals, Solemn Observances, and Spiritual Commemorations (2011). [about]
    29. Baha'u'llah, the Messenger of God: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1990). Short biography of Baha'u'llah with scriptural excerpts. [about]
    30. Baha'u'llah, The Promised One: Warwick Leaflet, by Local Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Warwick (1990). [about]
    31. Bahiyyih Khanum: The Greatest Holy Leaf, by Bahá'í World Centre. A compilation from Bahá'í sacred texts and writings of the Guardian of the Faith and Bahíyyih Khánum's own letters. [about]
    32. Bahiyyih Khanum: Eulogy for the Greatest Holy Leaf, in the Guardian's handwriting, by Shoghi Effendi (1932). A hand-written tribute to Bahiyyih Khanum, a daughter of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    33. Baron Rosen's Archive Collection of Bábí and Bahá'í Materials, by Youli A. Ioannesyan, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
    34. Bibliography for the Tablets of Baha'u'llah: List of citations and resources for Tablets revealed 1853-1863 (1999). Annotated list of historical references to Baha'u'llah's "Baghdad period". [about]
    35. Bibliography for the Tablets of Baha'u'llah: List of citations and resources for Tablets revealed 1863-1868 (1999). Annotated list of historical references to Baha'u'llah's "Adrianople period". [about]
    36. Bibliography for the Tablets of Baha'u'llah: List of citations and resources for Tablets revealed 1868-1877 (1999). Annotated list of historical references to Baha'u'llah's "Akka period". [about]
    37. Bibliography for the Tablets of Baha'u'llah: List of citations and resources for Tablets revealed 1877-1892 (1999). Annotated list of historical references to Baha'u'llah's "Bahji period". [about]
    38. Bicentenaire de Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahá'í International Community (1992). French translation of the Bahá'í International Community's 1992 Statement on Bahá'u'lláh, updated for the 2017 bicentennial of the Birth of Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    39. Birth and Childhood of Baha'u'llah, by David Merrick (2008). Childhood and Early Life of Baha'u'llah, told in plain English and suitable for reading aloud. [about]
    40. "Book of Names" Mentioned in the Tablet of Carmel, The, by Bahá'u'lláh and Shoghi Effendi (2003). Letter from the House and a compilation explaining "People of Bahá" and the line in the Lawh-i-Karmil "Ere long will God sail His Ark upon thee, and will manifest the people of Bahá who have been mentioned in the Book of Names." [about]
    41. Celestial Burning, A: A Selective Study of the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Jack McLean (2012). Style, content, and context of World Order of Baha'u'llah and Dispensation of Baha'u'llah: part of chapter 1 of this lengthy analysis of the work of Shoghi Effendi (pages 1-71), offered as a sample. [about]
    42. Chosen Highway, The, by Lady Sarah Louisa Blomfield (Sitarih Khanum) (1940). [about]
    43. Chronological Issues in the Lawh-i-Hikmat of Bahá'u'lláh, Some, by Peter Terry, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). [about]
    44. Chronological study: Tablets to the Rulers, by Melissa Tansik (1998). Timeline of the rise of nation states, 1844-1871, and the history and fate of the rulers to whom Baha'u'llah wrote in the 1860s. [about]
    45. Commentary on a Verse of Rumi, by Juan Cole (1999). Summary and paraphrase of a tablet about a debate over the unity of being (wahdat al-wujud) in Sufi thought. [about]
    46. Commentary on the Surah of the Sun, by Bahá'u'lláh (1994). Baha'u'llah's explanation of a passage from the Qur'an. [about]
    47. Comments on the Intent of the Surih-i-Sabr, or Lawh-i-Ayyub, by Karen Anne Webb (2017). Does Bahá’u’lláh declare Himself to be the Promised One foretold by the Báb in the Surah of Patience/Job? [about]
    48. Compiler's Notes: Barstow Collection, by Thellie Lovejoy (2000). Introduction to and description of the Dwight Barstow archive. [about]
    49. Covenant, Day of the (November 26), by Christopher Buck, in Religious Celebrations: An Encyclopedia of Holidays, Festivals, Solemn Observances, and Spiritual Commemorations (2011). [about]
    50. Covenant-breakers and other Enemies of the Faith, Writings of; Photographs of Baha'u'llah, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi (2000). Baha'i scholars may, when needed, use books by Covenant Breakers, including William Miller's The Baha'i Faith. [about]
    51. Creative Word and the Meaning of Unity, The: An annotated survey of Bahá'u'lláh's Lawh-i-Ittihád (Tablet of Unity), by Shahrokh Monjazeb. On the contents of the Tablet of Unity and its relevance for the social life of humanity, including a provisional English translation from the earliest Persian/Arabic published source. [about]
    52. Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Baha'u'llah for Baha'i Holy Days, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Forty-five selections revealed for, or relating to, nine Bahá’í Holy Days. [about]
    53. Days of Remembrance: Selections, by Bahá'u'lláh (2015). Three English translations of short Tablets by Bahá’u’lláh from a forthcoming collection of Holy Writings called Days of Remembrance, about the nine Bahá'í holy days. [about]
    54. Dispensation of Baha'u'llah: Study Guide, by Soroush Shakib (2000). Short study questions, some by Morten Bergsmo, for each paragraph of this document. [about]
    55. Dutch Library Holdings (2000). Complete list of items relating to Babi or Baha'i studies housed in the three principle libraries in the Netherlands. [about]
    56. Dwight Barstow Collection (2000). List of 478 translated tablets and other English documents from the library of American collector Dwight Barstow. [about]
    57. Effulgences (Tajallíyát): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    58. Enigmatic Questions Surrounding the Appearances of the Prophets, by John S. Hatcher (2011). [about]
    59. Epistle to Mihrabán: Excerpt, by Bahá'u'lláh (1928). Short excerpt translated by Shoghi Effendi and published in The Bahá'í World vol. 2, p. 57. [about]
    60. Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, by Bahá'u'lláh (1979). [about]
    61. Epistle to the Son of the Wolf (Lawh-i-Ibn-i-Dhib): Self-quotations from Baha'u'llah found in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf (1998). Compares Baha'u'llah's self-quotations in the Epistle with their earlier versions. [about]
    62. Explanation of a Zoroastrian Prophecy: Length of the "Bahá'í Cycle", by Karl Weaver (2017). Review of certain concepts in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, ancient astrology, and modern astronomical findings to shed light on Abdu'l-Baha's interpretation of a prophecy by Zoroaster about the sun being brought to a standstill. [about]
    63. Exposition of the Tablet of the World (Lawh-i-Dunyá), An, by James B. Thomas, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). To fully appreciate the historical significance of the Tablet of the World, this essay first portrays the developing conditions in Persia and in the world that preceded this Tablet, then discusses its salient points. [about]
    64. Eyewitness Account of Bahá'u'lláh's Ascension, An, by Andalib (2005). An eyewitness account of Bahá’u’lláh’s passing. [about]
    65. Fadl-i-Qa'ini: The Tamed Phoenix, by Darius Shahrokh, in Windows to the Past (1992). History of an early Baha'i, teacher of Mirza Abu'l-Fadl Gulpaygani, and in whose honor the Lawh-i-Hikmat was revealed. [about]
    66. Fifty Three Years In Syria, by Henry H. Jessup (1910). Passing encounters between Baha'is and a Christian missionary in Iran, 1867-1901. [about]
    67. Fire Tablet, by Bahá'u'lláh (1937). Tablet of "The Hearts of the Sincere are Consumed in the Fire" (Lawh-i-Qad-Ihtaraqa`l-Mukhlisún). [about]
    68. Fire Tablet, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Rituals in Babism and Bahá'ísm (1994). Tablet of "The Hearts of the Sincere are Consumed in the Fire" (Lawh-i-Qad-Ihtaraqa`l-Mukhlisún). [about]
    69. Four Levels of Detachment in Doris Lessing's Shikasta, The, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 14:3-4 (2004). [about]
    70. From Adrianople to Akka, by Abu'l-Qasim Faizi, in Conqueror of Hearts (1968). A talk to the Oceanic Conference, Palermo, Sicily, on the exile journeys of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    71. From Iran East and West, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 2 (1984). [about]
    72. Further Comments on a Passage of the Lawh-i-Hikmat, by Amin E. Egea, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). A study of Pre-Islamic sources on the relation of Greek Philosophers and Jewish sages. [about]
    73. Gems of Divine Mysteries, by Bahá'u'lláh (2002). A lengthy tablet in Arabic on how the Mahdi was Ali Muhammad, The Báb, the Primal Point. Written during the Baghdad period for Siyyid Yúsuf-i-Sihdihí Isfahání. His questions were brought from Karbila, and answered the same day. [about]
    74. Genealogy of Bab, The, by Mirza Abid, in The Dawn-Breakers. Genealogy of the family of the Bab and the family of Baha'u'llah in relation to the Bab. [about]
    75. Genealogy of The Báb and Bahá'u'lláh, by Kay Zinky (1950). Chart showing the Semitic line of prophets, including source citations. [about]
    76. Glad-Tidings (Bishárát): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Robert Stockman (1999). [about]
    77. Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahá'u'lláh (1988). [about]
    78. Glimpse of Glory, A: Stories of the Life of Baha'u'llah, by Darius Shahrokh, in Windows to the Past (1992). Anecdotes about some early followers of Baha'u'llah, and the circumstances of his own life. [about]
    79. Global Claims, Global Aims: An Analysis of Shoghi Effendi's The World Order of Bahá'u'lláh, by Zaid Lundberg, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). What is Shoghi Effendi’s discourse on 'globalization' and 'globality', and what are the global claims and aims in World Order? [about]
    80. Goal of a New World Order, The, interactive study guide, by Duane Troxel (2004). A PDF interactive study guide to Shoghi Effendi's letter "The Goal of a New World Order," which was published in World Order of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    81. God the All-Humorous, by Universal House of Justice (1997). Did Baha'u'llah ever refer to God as the "All-Humorous"? [about]
    82. Greatest Holy Leaf, The, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani. [about]
    83. He who knoweth his self hath known his Lord: Commentary, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). Translation by Shoghi Effendi, completed by Cole. Themes include Islamic mysticism and the meaning of detachment, the meaning of the hadith about knowing one's self, the meaning of Return, and the hadith "The believer is alive in both worlds." [about]
    84. Hidden Words, by Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Bahá'u'lláh's review of the most important themes of prior scriptures and religions, written in the style of Persian mystical poetry. [about]
    85. Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith, by Moojan Momen (1990). An attempt to explore the relationship between Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith and to explain the Bahá'í Faith to those who are from a Hindu background. [about]
    86. Historical Analysis of Critical Transformations in the Evolution of the Bahá'í World Faith, An, by Vernon Elvin Johnson (1974). Detailed study of major changes in the Faith's history, opposition to such changes, and their resulting tensions and resolutions. [about]
    87. History of the House of Bahá'u'lláh in Tihran, Iran (1978). Brief history of the birth-place of Baha'u'llah distributed to pilgrims to the site. [about]
    88. House of Baha'u'llah in Baghdad: Case before the League of Nations, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of 'Iraq (1928). [about]
    89. How Bahá'u'lláh Taught Christians: The Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Bahá'u'lláh's Writings to Followers of Jesus Christ, by Ted Brownstein (1998). How Baha'u'llah prepared his message to attract Christians; poetic and rhetorical devices he used in declaring his mission to them; themes of Tablets to the Kings, Tablet to the Pope, and Lawh-i-Aqdas. [about]
    90. Hymn to Love (Sáqí, bi-dih ábí), A, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A ghazal, a mystical song of love about The Beloved, meaning God or a Manifestation. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
    91. Index to Ad'iyyih-i-Hadrat-i-Mahbúb (1994). Index of the contents of an Arabic and Persian Baha'i collection of prayers and scripture. [about]
    92. Indexes of Tablet names, diacritics, and transliteration: Revelation of Bahá'u'lláh, by Adib Taherzadeh, in Revelation of Bahá'u'lláh, Volumes 1-4 (1982). Indexes only, useful for (1) referencing the diacritics and transliteration of Tablet names, and (2) knowing in which books Taherzadeh discusses which tablets. [about]
    93. Indexes to Bahá'í World volumes: Obituaries, chronologies, contents, illustrations, in Bahá'í World (2013). Seven separate indexes for Bahá'í World, in PDF, Word, and Excel versions. [about]
    94. Ishraqát, Tablet of, Date of Revelation, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Clues that could provide a date for the revelation of Baha'u'llah's "Tablet of Ishraqat." Includes part of Sen McGlinn's original query to which the House. [about]
    95. Keys to the Proper Understanding of Islam in The Dispensation of Baha'u'llah, by Brian Wittman, in Lights of Irfan, 2 (2001). [about]
    96. Kitáb-i-Aqdas, by Bahá'u'lláh (1992). [about]
    97. Kitáb-i-Aqdas (Most Holy Book): Questions and Concordances, by Habib Riazati (2000). Study questions, categorized cross-references to the Aqdas and its notes and "Questions and Answers," topical concordances, and other research materials. [about]
    98. Kitab-i-Aqdas questions and concordances, by Habib Riazati. The Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh and their relationship to selected passages in The Aqdas; New Laws That Abrogate the Laws of Former Dispensations; Correlation of Paragraphs, Notes, and Questions and Answers of the Aqdas; sample questions. [about]
    99. Kitáb-i-Íqán, by Bahá'u'lláh (1931). [about]
    100. Kitab-i-Iqan: Key to Unsealing the Mysteries of the Holy Bible, by Brent Poirier (1998). Examination of the Bible in light of interpretations of its symbolism offered by Baha'u'llah's Kitab-i-Iqan. [about]
    101. Lawh-i-Dunyá, Tablet of the World: Meaning of Urvatu'l-Vuthqá, "Sure Handle", by Iraj Ayman (1999). [about]
    102. Lawh-i-Hikmat: The Two Agents and the Two Patients, by Vahid Rafati, in Andalib, 5:19 (2002). Discussion of the two terms fa`ilayn (the active force / "the generating influence") and munfa`ilayn (its recipient / "such as receive its impact") in Islamic philosophy, and their later use in Shaykhi and Baha'i texts. [about]
    103. Lawh-i-Hikmat, Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of Wisdom: Towards a Progressive Bahá'í Theology, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
    104. Leiden List: Bibliography to the Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, by Sen McGlinn (2009). [about]
    105. Les Tablettes de Bahá'u'lláh révélées après le Kitáb-i-Aqdas, by Udo Schaefer, in Encyclopédie Philosophique Universelle, vol. 3 tome 1 (1992). [about]
    106. Letter to Jináb-i-Áqá Mírzá Bádí'u'lláh Khán of Abadih, by Shoghi Effendi (1997). Answers four questions: (1) re "Crimson Scroll"; (2) re the "Sacred Night"; (3) re the "Tablet of the Bell"; and (4) using the Kitab-i-Aqdas for bibliomancy. [about]
    107. Letters to Bahá'í princesses: Tablets revealed in honour of the women of Ibn-i Asdaq's household, by Dominic Parvis Brookshaw, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
    108. Lifetime with Bahá'u'lláh, A: Events in Baghdad, Istanbul, Edirne and ‘Akká while in the Company of Bahá'u'lláh, by Aqa Husayn Ashchi, in Witnesses to Babi and Bahá'í History, vol. 14 (2007). One-third of a lengthy primary-source history, annotated by translator. [about]
    109. List of Descendants of Mirza Buzurg of Nur, the Father of Baha'u'llah, in Materials for the Study of the Babi Religion. Brief genealogy of Baha'u'llah and His family. [about]
    110. Logos and Civilization: Spirit, History, and Order in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Nader Saiedi: Review, by Seena Fazel and Dominic Parvis Brookshaw, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). [about]
    111. Logos and Civilization: Spirit, History, and Order in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Nader Saiedi: Review, by Christopher Buck, in H-Bahá'í, H-Net Reviews (2004). [about]
    112. Los Apóstoles de Bahá'u'lláh: Un cuadro básico de los 19 Apóstoles de Bahá'u'lláh, by Husayn Villar. A poster showing photos and names of the 19 "apostles" of Baha'u'llah. In Spanish, but useful for non-Spanish speakers as well. [about]
    113. Making the Crooked Straight, by Udo Schaefer and Nicola Towfigh, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). Two pages on a prophecy concerning the advent of Man Yuzhiruhu'llah. [about]
    114. Manifestations of God and the Master: Representation of in Portraits, Photographs, and Dramatic Presentations, by Shoghi Effendi and Universal House of Justice. Excerpts on the use of imagery of the Central Figures in art, stage, and print. [about]
    115. Map of Stages in Baha'u'llah's Successive Exiles from Tihran to Akka, by Muhammad Labib (1968). Map of Stages in Baha'u'llah's Successive Exiles from Tihran to Akka, compiled and designed by Muhammad Labib in 1968, includes an extensive list of which tablets Baha'u'llah revealed and where. [about]
    116. Map of the Travels of Baha'u'llah (1991). The progressive exiles of Baha'u'llah through the Middle East. [about]
    117. Marking the Bicentenary of the Birth of Bahá'u'lláh, by Universal House of Justice (2017). Thoughts on the meaning of Baha'u'llah's life and current Baha'i activities, inspired by the 200th anniversary of his birth. [about]
    118. Marriage certificates of The Bab and Baha'u'llah, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 5 (1932-1934) (1934). Marriage certificates of The Báb and Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    119. Mathnaviyí-i Mubárak, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    120. Memories of Ashchi: Background, by Ahang Rabbani and Sen McGlinn (1999). Background information on and a start at translation of the narratives of Aqa Husayn Ashchi. [about]
    121. Memories of the Báb, Bahá'u'lláh and 'Abdu'l-Bahá: Memoirs of Mírzá Habíbu'lláh Afnán, in Witnesses to Babi and Bahá'í History, vol. 4 (2005). Autobiography of a close confidant of the holy family. Includes appendices on Baha'i historical places in Shiraz, the Afnán family genealogy, and excerpts from Houshmand Fatheazam’s diary [about]
    122. Messages from the Universal House of Justice 1963-86, by Universal House of Justice (1996). [about]
    123. Midhat Pasha and 'Abdu'l-Baha in 'Akka: The Historical Background of the Tablet of the Land of Bá, by Necati Alkan, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 13 (2005). Background of the tablet Lawh-i-Ard-i-Bá, revealed by Baha'u'llah on occasion of Abdu'l-Baha travelling to Beirut to meet the governor of Syria. Includes an account by Mirza Haydar Ali of the Pasha's visit. [about]
    124. Minutes of the Fourteenth Session, 1928, by Permanent Mandates Commission (1928). Petition to the League of Nations from the Spiritual Assembly of Baghdad regarding confiscation of property. [about]
    125. Minutes of the Sixteenth Session, 1929, by Permanent Mandates Commission (1929). Petition from the Bahai Spiritual Assembly of Baghdad regarding the confiscation of property; measures taken after the Council's decision. [about]
    126. Miscellaneous historical and doctrinal topics, by John Walbridge, in Essays and Notes on Babi and Bahá'í History (2002). Short comments on miscellaneous topics: Seven Proofs, Lawh-i-Aqdas, Dreams, Evolution, RMS Titanic. [about]
    127. My Memories of Baha'u'llah, by Ustad Muhammad-'Ali Salmani. [about]
    128. Notes and Commentary on the Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh: Wilmette Institute study materials (2002). Large collection of outlines, commentaries, and study guides prepared by Wilmette Institute faculty. [about]
    129. Notes and Mazandarani's "9 Styles of Revelation" (1999). [about]
    130. Number of tablets revealed by Bahá'u'lláh, by Robert Stockman and Juan Cole (1999). Informal accounting of the number of writings of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    131. Nuri, Mirza Abbas Buzurg: Complete Genealogy Report (2008). [about]
    132. Ocean of His Words, by John Hatcher: Review, by Sen McGlinn, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    133. Oceans of Light: The Major Works of Bahá'u'lláh, by Robert Stockman (2010). PowerPoint presentation on the scope, style, and history of the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    134. Ode of the Dove, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
    135. Ornaments (Tarázát): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Robert Stockman (1999). [about]
    136. Palestine: A Study of Jewish, Arab, and British Policies, volume 2, by Esco Foundation for Palestine (1947). One-page discussion of Baha'is being evicted from properties in Iraq, and their appeal to the League of Nations Permanent Mandates Commission. [about]
    137. Petition from the Persian Reformers (1867). A petition sent by Baha'is in Baghdad and Shushtar, Iran, in 1867 to the US Consulate general, seeking assistance in getting Baha'u'llah released from imposed exile. [about]
    138. Photograph of Baha'u'llah on Website, by Universal House of Justice (1999). Source of a photo of Baha'u'llah publicly displayed on a non-Baha'i website, and whether action can be taken to have it removed. [about]
    139. Photographs of Bahá'u'lláh; William Miller, by Universal House of Justice (1980). Two questions and a short compilation occasioned by William Miller's book The Baha'i Faith: Its History and Teachings: reading books by covenant-breakers, and viewing photographs of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    140. Pilgrimage in Baha'u'llah's Writings, by Ahang Rabbani (2010). On pilgrimage to the Twin Shrines in the Holy Land and their Tablets of Visitation, to the House of the Bab in Shiraz, and to the House of Baha’u’llah in Baghdad. [about]
    141. Poetry as Revelation: Introduction to Bahá'u'lláh's 'Mathnavíy-i Mubárak', by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    142. Portion of Tablet to Hájí Mírzá Haydar-'Alí, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Eminent Bahá'ís in the Time of Bahá'u'lláh with some Historical Background (1985). [about]
    143. Prayer for Illumination, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Ad'iyyih Hadrát-i-Mahbúb (1999). 2-paragraph prayer from Ad'iyyih Hadrát-i-Mahbúb. [about]
    144. Prayer Revealed by the Exalted Pen for Mírzá 'Abu'l-Fadl, by Bahá'u'lláh (1995). Authorized translation of a short prayer, with a short introduction from the BWC Research Department. [about]
    145. Prayers and Meditations, by Bahá'u'lláh (1988). [about]
    146. Prayers and rituals in the Bahá'í Faith: Introduction to A Tablet to Jináb-i-Mullá 'Alí-Akbar fí Ardi'l-Álif, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
    147. Problems of Chronology in Baha'u'llah's Tablet of Wisdom, by Juan Cole, in World Order, 13:3 (1979). On the biographical section of the Lawh-i-Hikmat and its background in Islamic models. [about]
    148. Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh: Cross-reference to the Leiden List and Editable "Wiki" Pages. Cross-references of the Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh to the Leiden List bibliography and some editable Wiki pages [about]
    149. Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahá'u'lláh (1978). [about]
    150. Proclamation of Baha'u'llah sources (2000). Cross-reference chart of passages published in Proclamation of Baha'u'llah with Summons of the Lord of Hosts and other published sources. [about]
    151. Promise of All Ages, The, by George Townshend (1934). Overview of Baha'i teachings: a "sketch of the religious teaching of Bahá’u’lláh on the subject of the unity of mankind and the establishment in this century of a universal and permanent peace." [about]
    152. Regarding the implementation of the Badi` calendar, by Universal House of Justice (2014). Message to the Bahá’ís of the world on the updated calendar of Baha'i holy days. Includes a table of Bahá’í Dates 172 to 221 B.E., and a letter to an individual explaining the date of the astronomical new moon in Islamic and Baha'i calendars. [about]
    153. Remember My Days: The Life-Story of Bahá'u'lláh, by Lowell Johnson (1980). Biography of the prophet-founder of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
    154. Revealed on the Day of Ridván: Excerpt, by Bahá'u'lláh (2001). Excerpt from a Tablet revealed by Bahá'u'lláh proclaiming the new Revelation. [about]
    155. Revelation of Baha'u'llah volume 1: Baghdad, 1853-63, by Adib Taherzadeh (1974). Link to formatted book (offsite). [about]
    156. Revelation of Baha'u'llah volume 2: Adrianople, 1863-1868, by Adib Taherzadeh (1977). Link to formatted book (offsite). [about]
    157. Revelation of Baha'u'llah volume 3: `Akká, The Early Years, 1868-77, by Adib Taherzadeh (1983). Link to formatted book (offsite). [about]
    158. Revelation of Baha'u'llah volume 4: Mazra'ih & Bahjí, 1877-92, by Adib Taherzadeh (1987). Link to formatted book (offsite). [about]
    159. Revelation, Interpretation, and Elucidation in the Baha'i Writings, by Robert Stockman, in Scripture and Revelation, ed. Moojan Momen (1997). [about]
    160. Ridvan, by John Walbridge, in Sacred Acts, Sacred Space, Sacred Time: Bahá'í Studies volume 1 (1995). Two versions of a short article about the 12-day Baha'i festival. [about]
    161. River of Life, The: A Selection from the Teachings of Baha'u'llah and Abdu'l-Baha (1914). An early book-length compilation, edited and translated by Dawud. [about]
    162. Rizal, Revelation and Revolution: Rizal's Letter to the Women of Malolos and Baha'u'llah's letter to Nabil Akbar Lawh-i-Hikmat (Tablet of Wisdom) , by Stephen Ramo (2011). Comparison of letter by Philippine national hero José Rizal to the women of Malolos with Bahá'u'lláh's "Tablet of Wisdom" to Nabil. [about]
    163. Roll of Honor Bahá'í World Crusade 1953-1963, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 20 (1986-1992) (1998). A scroll listing the names of the Knights of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    164. Russian Publication of Baha'u'llah's Last Will and Testament, The: An Academic Attestation of 'Abdu'l-Baha's Successorship, by Christopher Buck and Youli A. Ioannesyan, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 19 (2013). On the content of the Kitab-i-Ahdi, its manuscript history, and textual variants; Andalib's eyewitness account of its unveiling; Tumanski's scholarly work; contemporary attestation of 'Abdu'l-Baha's successorship by Tumanski and other Russian notables. [about]
    165. Salmani's My Memories of Baha'u'llah, Publication of, by Universal House of Justice (1982). Two letters, to a Baha'i publisher and an individual, regarding the 1982 publication of My Memories of Baha'u'llah, an autobiography of Baha'u'llah's barber, Ustad Salmani. [about]
    166. Seeds of Revelation and the Mystic Bond between The Báb and Bahá'u'lláh: An Exposition on Excerpts from the Persian Bayán, by James B. Thomas, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
    167. Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys, by Bahá'u'lláh (1991). [about]
    168. Shoghi Effendi: Recollections, by Ugo Giachery (1973). Biography of Shoghi Effendi from the close standpoint of the author's personal experiences. Short excerpt from book; Part 1 only. [about]
    169. Shoghi Effendi's The Dispensation of Bahá'u'lláh: A Theology of the Word, by Jack McLean, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
    170. Short Poem by "Darvísh" Muhammad, Bahá'u'lláh: Sáqí az ghayb-i baqá burqa' bar afkan az 'idhár, A: An Introduction and Three Versions of Provisional English Translations, by Frank Lewis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
    171. Significance of some Sites Mentioned in Memorials of the Faithful, by Foad Seddigh, in Lights of Irfan, 17 (2016). Abdu'l-Baha cited many villages and cities: the Most Great House in Baghdád; the ruins of Madaen which Baha'u'llah visited many times; Sheikh Tabarsi's tomb; the city of Mosul which is built on the ruins of the ancient city of Nineveh. [about]
    172. Sources of Gleanings from the Writings of Baha'u'llah, by Vahid Rafati and Denis MacEoin (1997). List of the original Tablets excerpted by Shoghi Effendi in compiling Gleanings. [about]
    173. Sprinkling of the Cloud of Unknowing, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 3:2 (1984). The first extent Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    174. Statement on Bahá'u'lláh, A, by Bahá'í International Community (1992). Introduction to the life and work of Baha'u'llah, released in 1992 in honor of the centenary of his death, at the request of the Universal House of Justice. [about]
    175. Station of Baha'u'llah: Three Letters, by Universal House of Justice (1991). Three letters on the station of Baha'u'llah, the souls of the Manifestations, the varying intensities of their Revelations, the phrase "most precious Being," and on teaching the Faith to Christians. [about]
    176. Stories of Baha'u'llah and Some Notable Believers, by Adib Taherzadeh (2003). Extracts compiled from Adib Taherzadeh’s The Revelation of Bahá’u’lláh, Volumes 1-4. [about]
    177. Study Guide of the Tablet of Maqsúd, by Marco Oliveira (2009). The Tablet of Maqsúd is a good presentation of the principles and teachings of the Bahá’í Faith. Its structure is suitable for a first contact with the Bahá'í Writings. [about]
    178. Suffering of Bahá'u'lláh, The, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Deepening Portfolio Number 3 (1974). [about]
    179. Suffering of the Exalted Letters, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Tablet written in Baghdad about death and the development of the human soul. [about]
    180. Summons of the Lord of Hosts, by Bahá'u'lláh (2002). [about]
    181. Summons of the Lord of Hosts: Cross-Referenced to Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, the Leiden List, and Other Works (2003). [about]
    182. Surah of God, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 6:4-7:2 (1992). Includes essay about the "Most Great Separation"(1866) and historical events in Baha'u'llah's household in the mid-1860s. [about]
    183. Surah of the Arabs, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Tablet revealed in the early `Akká period to the Bahá'ís of Arab extraction living in Iráq. [about]
    184. Surah of the Companions, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 5:34-6:1 (1991). One of Baha'u'llah's first public proclamatory tablets, following his private proclamation in 1863. [about]
    185. Surih of Admonition (Suratu'l-Nus'h): Revealed for Siyyid Ja'far-i-Yazdí, by Bahá'u'lláh (2012). A tablet in which Baha'u'llah identifies with God and speaks as His mouthpiece, describes the appearance of the Prophets from Adam to the Báb, counsels the learned to be ready for the Promised One, and refers to his enemy Shaykh 'Abdu'l-Husayn-i-Tihrání. [about]
    186. Surih of the Sun (Súriy-i-Vash-Shams): Introduction and Commentary, by Juan Cole (1994). Overview of a tablet of Baha'u'llah touching on matters of interpretation and theology. [about]
    187. Surih of Visitation, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). Addressing Mulla Husayn's sister Leaf of Paradise, Baha'u'llah recounts the oppression of past prophets at the hands of an adversary, tells of his own sufferings, affirms his spiritual victory, and reveals a prayer of visitation for The Bab. [about]
    188. Tabernacle of Unity, The: Bahá'u'lláh's Responses To Mánikchi Sáhib, by Bahá'u'lláh (2006). [about]
    189. Tablet of 'Abdu'l-Bahá Explaining Three Verses in the Lawh-i-Hikmat, A, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2005). Insights into three statement by Baha'u'llah on pre-existence, creation, and nature as the essence of God. [about]
    190. Tablet of All Food, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 3:1 (1984). [about]
    191. Tablet of Blood, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    192. Tablet of Consolation, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Letter to an early believer following the death of his father, in which Baha'u'llah teaches that death should not be a cause of grief, but is a transition in the journey of drawing nearer to God, who is the true source of comfort and solace. [about]
    193. Tablet of Hallelujah Hallelujah Hallelujah O Glad Tidings, by Bahá'u'lláh (1983). Two versions: a literalistic translation by Stephen Lambden and a poetic one by Sen McGlinn. [about]
    194. Tablet of Holiness, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). An ethical exhortation stressing humanity's oneness and common origin, addressed to Arab Bahá'ís in Baghdad. [about]
    195. Tablet of Joseph, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Untitled 1904 compilation, Volume 1 (1904). [about]
    196. Tablet of Maqsud, by Universal House of Justice (2001). Date of the revelation of the Tablet of Maqsúd and its mention of "Two great powers." [about]
    197. Tablet of Maqsúd (Lawh-i-Maqsúd): Guidance on Human Nature and Leadership, by Ramin Neshati, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
    198. Tablet of Medicine, by Bahá'u'lláh. An anonymous translation of the Tablet to a Physician. [about]
    199. Tablet of Nightingale of Separation, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    200. Tablet of Patience (Surih Sabr): Declaration of Bahá'u'lláh and Selected Topics, by Foad Seddigh, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). This significant Tablet from Ridvan 1863 covers the Seal of the Prophets, appearance and presence of God, resurrection, and the Qayyum al-Asma. Includes context of Baha'u'llah's life and troubles during this period. [about]
    201. Tablet of Patience, or Tablet of Job, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). A notable, and lengthy, tablet from 1863. [about]
    202. Tablet of Pilgrimage to the House of Bahá'u'lláh: Baghdad, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Rituals in Babism and Bahá'ísm, Pembroke Persian Series Vol. 2 (1994). A provisional English translation of instructions by Baha'u'llah for pilgrimage to the House of Baha'u'llah in Baghdad. [about]
    203. Tablet of Shikkar Shikan: Excerpt, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). [about]
    204. Tablet of Shikkar Shikan Shavand, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    205. Tablet of Splendors (Lawh-i-Ishráqát): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    206. Tablet of the 'Light Verse' (Lawh-i-Áyiy-i-Núr), also known as Commentary on the Disconnected Letters: Overview, by Adib Taherzadeh and Nabil-i-A'zam (1999). [about]
    207. Tablet of the Centennial, by Shoghi Effendi (1998). An epistle to the Persian-speaking Baha'is. Includes English translation of Muhammad Varqa's "Le Style persan du Gardien." [about]
    208. Tablet of The Desired One (Lawh-i-Maqsúd): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Universal House of Justice and Juan Cole (1999). [about]
    209. Tablet of the Garden of Ridván, by Bahá'u'lláh. Short tablet from the late ’Akká period, revealed during one of Bahá’u’lláh’s visits to the small house inside the Garden of Ridván where he joined the believers for feasting. [about]
    210. Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Bahá'u'lláh. Complete tablet, both the Arabic (officially translated) and the Persian (provisionally translated) sections. [about]
    211. Tablet of the Maiden, by Bahá'u'lláh (1999). A mystical vision about union with the beloved. [about]
    212. Tablet of the Manifestation, by Bahá'u'lláh (1998). [about]
    213. Tablet of the Mist of the Unknown, by Bahá'u'lláh (2000). [about]
    214. Tablet of the Nightingale and the Owl (1863). The Tablet of the Nightingale and the Owl is a short story, which reads like a fairy tale, about the search for the Beloved. [about]
    215. Tablet of the River [Tigris], by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). Includes introduction by translator. [about]
    216. Tablet of the Sacred Night, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    217. Tablet of the Uncompounded Reality: Translation, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). [about]
    218. Tablet of the Waves, by Bahá'u'lláh (1998). [about]
    219. Tablet of Unity, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). [about]
    220. Tablet of Unity, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Lights of Irfan, 2 (2001). [about]
    221. Tablet of Vision, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    222. Tablet of Visitation for Imám Husayn, by Bahá'u'lláh (2002). Tablet in honor of Imam Husayn, the prince of martyrs, with whom Baha'u'llah identified in a mystical connection. [about]
    223. Tablet of Visitation for Vahid-i Darabi, by Bahá'u'lláh. Tablet for the leader of the 1850 uprising at Nayriz. [about]
    224. Tablet of Wisdom (Lawh-i-hikmat), by Juan Cole (1995). [about]
    225. Tablet of Wisdom (Lawh-i-Hikmat): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    226. Tablet of Wisdom (Lawh-i-Hikmat): Study Guide (2017). Lengthy study guide, with the Arabic original, compiled by a group of six study group participants. [about]
    227. Tablet of Wisdom Questions and Answers, by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Ethel Jenner Rosenberg, the Life and Times of England's Outstanding Bahá'í Pioneer Worker, by Robert Weinberg (1995). Authorized translation of unpublished Tablet of 'Abdu'l-Bahá to Ethel Rosenberg in 1906 in reply to her questions about historical statements in the Lawh-i-Hikmat. [about]
    228. Tablet of [Mount] Carmel (Lawh-i-Karmil): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Peter Terry and Ted Brownstein (1999). [about]
    229. Tablet on Interpretation of Sacred Scripture (Ta'wíl), by Bahá'u'lláh (2001). An undated tablet from the Akka period on the interpretation of sacred scripture, with references to previous Tablets revealed after the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Asl-i-Kullu’l-Khayr (Words of Wisdom) and Lawh-i-Maqsúd (Tablet of Maqsúd). [about]
    230. Tablet on Interpretation of Sacred Scripture (Ta'wíl), by Bahá'u'lláh, in Iqtidarat (n.d.). Tablet on "the legitimacy of figurative scripture interpretation." [about]
    231. Tablet on the Daystar of Divine Beauty, by Bahá'u'lláh (2003). Poetic Tablet of Bahá’u’lláh dating from the Baghdád, Istanbul, or Edirne periods. [about]
    232. Tablet on the Right of the People, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). On some situations relating to a person’s private rights, in this case theft and debt, with a larger meditation on the spiritual rights a person earns through righteous deeds, and God’s promise to reward good deeds and punish the wrong. [about]
    233. Tablet on Understanding the Cause of Opposition to the Manifestations of God, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). Summary of some themes from the Kitab-i-Iqan, concluding with a long prayer inviting the reader to see with his/her "own eyes." [about]
    234. Tablet Revealed by Bahá'u'lláh Commemorating His Birth, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). A short tablet by Baha'u'llah in which he commemorates his birthday (November 12, 1817), proclaims the greatness of his cause, and exhorts all to turn to God and recognise his revelation. [about]
    235. Tablet to Áqá Mírzá Áqá: Excerpt, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Eminent Bahá'ís in the Time of Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Short one-paragraph tablet to The Báb's aunt's son, from H. M. Balyuzi's Eminent Bahá’ís. [about]
    236. Tablet to Ashraf, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). Guidance to three men who later became martyrs, news to share about Baha'u'llah, and comments on the nature of his revelation. [about]
    237. Tablet to Fuad, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
    238. Tablet to Hájí Muhammad-Nasír-i-Qazvíní: Excerpts, by Bahá'u'lláh (1986). Excerpts translated by Christopher Buck in Studies in Bábí and Bahá’í History vol. 3 (Kalimát Press, 1986) and by Shoghi Effendi in Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    239. Tablet to Hardegg (Lawh-i-Hirtík): A Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh to the Templer Leader Georg David Hardegg, by Stephen Lambden and Kamran Ekbal, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
    240. Tablet to Hasan-i-Sháhábadí, by Bahá'u'lláh (2002). A tablet from the Akka period, addressed to a certain Hasan living in Sháhábad of Arak in central Irán, in which Bahá'u'lláh comments on Muhammad as the "Seal of the Prophets." [about]
    241. Tablet to Jamal-i-Burujirdi, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 5:1-2 (1991). Tablet to a one-time Covenant-breaker, also known as the Tablet of Beauty. [about]
    242. Tablet to Jináb-i-Mullá 'Alí-Akbar fí ardi'l-álif, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
    243. Tablet to Rad'ar-Rúh, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). Raḍ’ar-Rúḥ, a believer from Mashad, received this tablet shortly after Baha'u'llah arrived in Akka. In it, Baha'u'llah describes being pleased about the recent declaration of Christian doctor named Faris. [about]
    244. Tablet to Shaykh Kazim-i-Samandar II, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Eminent Bahá'ís in the Time of Bahá'u'lláh (1985). [about]
    245. Tablet to The Times of London, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Revelation of Bahá'u'lláh, by Adib Taherzadeh, Vol. 4 (1987). Short tablet calling newspapers to investigate the Truth. [about]
    246. Tablet to Varqá Regarding the Prince and King of Martyrs, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Eminent Bahá'ís in the Time of Bahá'u'lláh with some Historical Background (1985). Short tablet of tribute to the King and Beloved of the Martyrs, from H. M. Balyuzi's Eminent Bahá’ís. [about]
    247. Tablets concerning the Divine Test, by Bahá'u'lláh (2000). Baha'u'llah's writings about the divine test between Baha'u'llah and Mirza Yahya at the Sultan Selim Mosque in Edirne in September, 1867, which led to the final schism between the Baha'is and the Azali Babis. [about]
    248. Tablets of Baha'u'llah: Cross-reference between Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, the Leiden List, and Editable "Wiki" Pages. [about]
    249. Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh and `Abdu'l-Bahá from Star of the West, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Star of the West, Book 1 (1978). Compilation of tablets translated and published in Book 1 of the 1978 reprint of Star of the West, which contains all of Vol. 1, March 1910, and Vol. 2 to Number 11, September 1911. [about]
    250. Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh Revealed after the Kitab-i-Aqdas, by Bahá'u'lláh (1988). [about]
    251. Tablets of Baha'u'llah Revealed after the Kitab-i-Aqdas: Information on Circumstances of Revelation of Tablets, by Universal House of Justice Research Department (1997). List of recipients and dates of Section 17 of Tablets of Baha'u'llah Revealed after the Kitab-i-Aqdas, "Excerpts from other Tablets." [about]
    252. Tablets of Pilgrimage (Suriy-i-Hajj): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Iraj Ayman (1999). [about]
    253. Tablets of the Hair, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í News, 121 (1938). [about]
    254. Texts, Sacred, Numbers and Classifications of, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2002). Three letters, from 2002, 2010, and 2013, about numbers of Sacred Texts catalogued by the Baha'i World Center and their classification into "authenticated," "revised," and "transcribed." [about]
    255. Timeline to the Baghdad Period: Themes of Early Tablets and Historical Personages Related to them, by Kathryn Brown and Sharon Davis (2000). History and themes of and personages related to Baha'u'llah's Tablets of the Baghdad period (1853-63), including a graphical chronology. [about]
    256. Unfoldment of World Civilization, The, interactive study guide, by Duane Troxel (2004). A PDF interactive study guide to Shoghi Effendi's letter "The Unfoldment of World Civilization," which was published in World Order of Baha'u'llah. [about]
    257. Unrestrained as the Wind: A Life Dedicated to Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Compilation of quotations on topics of especial interest to Bahá'í youth. [about]
    258. Varqa and Son: The Heavenly Doves, by Darius Shahrokh, in Windows to the Past (1992). History of the family of Varqa, the only family with the distinction of having a grandfather, a father, and a son all named Hand of the Cause. [about]
    259. Virgin countries and territories opened during the first year of the 10 Year Crusade 1953-1954, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 12 (April 1950-1954) (1956). [about]
    260. Virgin Territories Opened by the Knights of Baha'u'llah 1953-1990, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 20 (1986-1992) (1998). List of names and dates of pioneers and the NSAs responsible for opening territories. [about]
    261. Whilst He Was in Suleymaniah: Extracts and poems from the memoirs of Nabil Zarandi, by Nabil-i-A'zam (2002). Handful of short extracts and poems from the memoirs of Nabíl-i-A`zam [aka Mullá Muḥammad-i-Zarandí, aka Nabíl-i-Zarandí]. on the conduct of the Bábís in 'Iráq during Bahá'u'lláh's self-imposed exile. From Nabil's unpublished narrative. [about]
    262. Windows to the Past, by Darius Shahrokh (1992). Deepening talks on 25 topics about Baha'i history and teachings, downloadable in MP3 audio format and PDF transcripts. [about]
    263. Wives of Baha'u'llah, by Universal House of Justice (1995). Information on Baha'u'llah's three wives, and a background to the Baha'i teaching that people should be monogamous in the modern age. [about]
    264. Words of Wisdom (Asl-i-Kullu'l-Khayr): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Robert Stockman and Iraj Ayman (1999). [about]
    265. World Order of Baha'u'llah: Study Questions, by Shahriar Razavi, in Studying the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, ed. Dwight Allen and Martin Bergsmo (1991). List of questions to inspire study and deepening. [about]
    266. World Order of Bahá'u'lláh, by Shoghi Effendi (1991). Letters written by the Guardian, 1929-1936. [about]
    267. Writings of Baha'u'llah, The, by Abdu'l-Hamid Ishraq-Khavari, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 14 (1963-1968) (1974). Part of a commentary by the renowned scholar `Abdu'l-Hamid-i-Ishraq Khavari, adapted by Habib Tahirzadih, summarizing many of the early and often untranslated Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    268. Wronged One, The: Shí'í Narrative Structure in Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of Visitation for Mullá Husayn, by William F. McCants, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
    269. Крупицы из Писаний: Gleanings from the Writings of Baha'u'llah, by Бахаулла (2009). Отрывки из различных произведений Бахауллы, собранные и переведённые на английский Шоги Эффенди, Хранителем Веры Бахаи. [about]
     
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