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Search for tag "Cambodia"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1954 1 Mar Shirin Fozdar visits Cambodia to receive the first medallion and Certificate of Satrei Vatthana (Champion of Women) from His Majesty King Norodom Sihanouk. She is the first Bahá’í to enter the country.
  • She is not able to teach the Faith openly but she does speak about it to the king’s parents.
Cambodia Shirin Fozdar; King Norodom Sihanouk
1957 c. The first local person to become a Bahá’í in Cambodia, Mr Lim Incchin, a young Chinese, enrols. Cambodia Lim Incchin
1959 Ridván The first local spiritual assembly in Cambodia is formed in Phnom Penh. Phnom Penh; Cambodia LSA
1964 Four new believers in Cambodia are arrested and imprisoned as the Bahá’í Faith is not formally recognized and the Bahá’ís do not have permission to teach it. Cambodia religious persecution
1964 19 Sep Prince Sihanouk Norodom, Head of State, and Prince Kantol Norodom, Prime Minister, sign a decree authorizing the exercise of the Bahá’í Faith in Cambodia and recognizing the Bahá’í World Centre in Haifa. Cambodia Prince Sihanouk Norodom; Prince Kantol Norodom
1994 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Cambodia is formed with its seat in Phnom Penh. [BINS317:1; BW93–4:82; BW94–5:25, 30–1] Phnom Penh; Cambodia
1995 Jan The first National Teaching Conference of Cambodia is held in Phnom Penh, attended by more than 50 Bahá'ís. [BINS334:2] Phnom Penh; Cambodia National Teaching Conference of Cambodia
2009 31 Jan – 1 Feb Regional Conferences held in Auckland, New Zealand and Battambang, Cambodia. [BWNS692] Auckland; New Zealand; Battambang; Cambodia Regional Conferences
2012 21 Apr Plans are announced that the Universal House of Justice is entering into consultations with respective National Spiritual Assemblies regarding the erection of the first local Houses of Worship in each of the following clusters: Battambang, Cambodia; Bihar Sharif, India; Matunda Soy, Kenya; Norte del Cauca, Colombia; and Tanna, Vanuatu. [Riḍván 2012 To the Bahá’ís of the World] Haifa; Israel; Battambang; Cambodia; Bihar Sharif; India; Matunda Soy; Kenya; Norte del Cauca; Colombia; and Tanna; Vanuatu. local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar; Local House of Worship; Mashriqu’l-Adhkar
2015 17 July Some 300 people attend the unveiling of the design of the first local Baha’i House of Worship in Battambang, Cambodia [BWNS 1062]
  • See BWNS for pictures.
Battambang; Cambodia Local Baha’i House of Worship; Local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar
2015 15 Nov The groundbreaking ceremony of the first local Baha’i House of Worship in Battambang, Cambodia was attended by some 200 community members. The event coincided with the commemoration of the Twin Holy Birthdays—the Birth of the Bab and the Birth of Baha'u'llah. [BWNS1082]
  • See BWNS for pictures.
Battambang; Cambodia Local Baha’i House of Worship; Local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar
2016 8 Mar The earthworks for the Local Baha’i House of Worship in Battambang, Cambodia is completed. [BWNS1100] Battambang; Cambodia Local Baha’i House of Worship; Local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar
2016 16 Sep For a progress report on the construction of the Local House of Worship in Battanbang, Cambodia see BWNS1120 Battambang; Cambodia Local Baha’i House of Worship; Local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar
2017 1 - 2 Sep The opening of Cambodia’s first “Local House of Worship” in Battambang, just over two years after the design of the building was unveiled in July 2015.

The Mashriqu’l-Adhkar was designed by Phnom Penh-based architect Tang Sochet Vitou. It is situated on a 9 hectare property of which 1.5 hectares is used for the temple, an administrative building as well as gardens and ponds. The temple is a frequent topic of conversation among the local population. Even before its completion, it has galvanized action towards the betterment of the community and brought neighbours together. it will help provide for the spiritual needs of Cambodia’s growing Baha’i community which, according to the Ministry of Cult and Religion’s most recent annual report, numbers about 12,000 although some adherents say the figure may now be closer to 20,000. Baha’i communities were first recorded in the kingdom in the 1920s and since 1992 they have grown steadily with the help of aid workers and Asian immigrants.

In a letter dated 18 December 2014, the Universal House of Justice explained that a Baha’i House of Worship is a “collective centre of society to promote cordial affection” and “stands as a universal place of worship open to all the inhabitants of a locality irrespective of their religious affiliation, background, ethnicity, or gender and a haven for the deepest contemplation on spiritual reality and foundational questions of life, including individual and collective responsibility for the betterment of society.”

The dedication was marked by a two-day conference bringing together over 2,500 people from Battambang and every other region of Cambodia. A number of Cambodian dignitaries attended along with representatives of Baha’i communities in Southeast Asia. The Universal House of Justice was represented by Ms. Sokuntheary Reth who serves on the Continental Board of Counsellors in Asia. [BWNS1185, BWNS1187, BWNS1189, BWNS1190 (slide show), BWNS1191 (video), BWNS1192]

Battambang; Cambodia Local Baha’i House of Worship; Local Mashriqu’l-Adhkar

from the main catalogue

  1. References to the Bahá'í Faith in the U.S. State Department's Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, by United States Department of State (1991). Excerpts from the State Department's annual compilation of Country Reports on Human Rights Practices on discrimination against the Baha'i Faith and persecution of its adherents in twenty countries. [about]
  2. Servants of the Glory: A Chronicle of Forty Years of Pioneering, by Adrienne Morgan and Dempsey Morgan (2017). Memoirs of a black couple from the United States who lived and spread the Bahá’í Faith in across parts of east Asia and Africa in the 1950s-1980s. Text by Dempsey Morgan, poems by Adrienne Morgan. Link to document offsite. [about]
 
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