Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "China"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1862 – 1868 Hájí Mírzá Muhammad-‘Alí, a cousin of the Báb, lives in Shanghai during this period. This is the first record of a Bábí or Bahá'í living in China. [PH24]

  • From 1870 he lived in Hong Kong dealing as a merchant and was joined by his brother, Hájí Mírzá Muhammad Husayn. [PH24]
Shanghai; Hong Kong; China Haji Mirza Muhammad-‘Ali; cousin; Bab; Babi; Baha'i; Haji Mirza Muhammad Husayn
1897 In the year Hájí Mírzá Muhammad-`Alí, the first Bahá'í to have settled China, dies in Bombay on his way back to Shíráz. [PH24]

The Hands of the Cause appointed by Bahá'u'lláh are instructed by `Abdu'l-Bahá to gather to begin the consultations regarding the future organization of the Bahá'í community in Tihrán.

  • This gathering leads to the formation of the Central Spiritual Assembly of Tihrán in 1899. [BBD98, 114, 115; EB268]
Fifteen Bahá'ís are arrested in Saysán, Ádharbáyján. They are taken to Tabríz, imprisoned and fined. [BW18:384]

Three Bahá'ís are arrested in Nayríz on the orders of Áqá Najafí, the `Son of the Wolf'. [BW18:384]

The homes of several Bahá'ís in Hamadán are looted and ransacked after complaints by Jews of the town against Bahá'ís of Jewish background. [BW18:384]

China; Bombay; Tihran; Saysan; Ádharbayjan; Tabriz; Nayriz; Hamadan Haji Mirza Muhammad-Ali; Spiritual Assemblies; Aqa Najafi; Persecution; First Bahais by country or area
1916 Apr or May The first Chinese Bahá'í in China, Chen Hai An (Harold A. Chen), becomes a Bahá'í in Chicago through the efforts of Dr Zia Baghdádí. [PH29-30]
  • PH30 says this was 1919 but this is clearly a typographical error.
  • He returns to China in December 1916.
China; Chicago; United States First Bahais by country or area; Zia Baghdadi
1923 25 Apr Martha Root leaves Osaka for northern China. [PH31]
  • It is her second visit to China and lasts until March 1924. [PH31-2]
China Martha Root
1923 4 Nov The first recorded Bahá'í Feast in China is held in Beijing. [PH33]
  • Martha Root and Agnes Alexander are present. [PH33]
China Feast; Martha Root; Agnes Alexander
1989 25 Jun The Universal House of Justice said in a message it was now timely for the knowledge of the Bahá'í Faith to be disseminated on the mainland of China as quickly as possible. [PH80]
  • Also see [SWvol13no7pg185; VV104]
China UHJ
1995 Aug 30 – Sep 8 The Bahá'í International Community and some 400 Bahá'í women and men from more than 50 countries around the world participate in the Fourth United Nations International Conference on Women and the parallel Non-Governmental Organization Forum, held in the resort city of Huairou some 50 kilometers north of Beijing, from 30 August to 8 September. [One Country Vol 7 Issue 2] Beijing; China Find ref

from the main catalogue

  1. 1/2, by Yang Juan (2006). An existential yet emotionally-charged dialogue between two young women. [about]
  2. Bahá'í country notes: China, by Graham Hassall (1997). History of the Baha'i community in China. [about]
  3. Bahá'í Communities by Country: Research Notes, by Graham Hassall (2000). Brief notes on the history of Baha'i activities and the dates of NSA formation in Africa, China, Australia, and elsewhere. [about]
  4. Challenge of Change for the Chinese in Southeast Asia, The, by Yin Hong Shuen, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Chinese Bahá'ís in some Asian countries are a microcosm of Chinese people in this region. An email survey asked what attracts Southeast Asians to the Faith, difficulties they face, and how adopting a world religion helps guide their future challenges. [about]
  5. Choice of the West for Abdu'l-Bahá's Epoch-Making Trip, The, by Baharieh Rouhani Ma'ani, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Reasons for Abdu'l-Baha choosing Western nations for the climax of his ministry, and results he achieved in Europe and the United States. [about]
  6. Common Teachings from Chinese Culture and the Bahá'í Faith: From Material Civilization to Spiritual Civilization, by Albert Cheung, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An examination of the similarities in belief between the Baha'i Faith and traditional Chinese culture. [about]
  7. Concept of the Manifestation of God in Chinese Symbolism: An Inter-civilizational Hermeneutic Study, by Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). Seemingly incompatible symbols can point to a common underlying meaning, connecting worldviews and perspectives often considered incommensurable. There are elements of the Chinese tradition that resonate deeply with the Bahá’í concept of Manifestation. [about]
  8. Dialogue Among Civilizations: Ancient and Future, Transitions and Potentials, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Many ideas in Chinese civilization resonate with Bahá'í thought. The I Ching highlights differences between western and eastern philosophy, the notion of embodiment in the Confucian view of the noble person, and transforming material to spiritual. [about]
  9. Future of Confucianism, The, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The history of Confucianism, its teachings, a critique of its place in the modern world, its future, and its survival into the 21st century. [about]
  10. Jamál Effendi and the early history of the Bahá'í Faith in South Asia, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). Includes maps on Jamal Effendi's journeys in India, and journeys in Southeast Asia. [about]
  11. Religious Chic, by Zuo Xuan, in Global Times (2010). A portrait of the Baha'is in contemporary China. [about]
  12. Yínyáng Cosmology and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). The yin-yang concept is pivotal to Chinese thought, culture, government, and ethics. It also bears many similarities with Baha'i philosophy and practice. [about]
 
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