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Search for tag "Conversion"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1868. c. May Bahá'u'lláh sends Nabíl-i-A`zam to Cairo to enquire after Hájí Mírzá Haydar-`Alí. He was instructed by Bahá'u'lláh to appeal to the officials for the release of several Bahá'ís who had been imprisoned in Cairo at the instigation of their enemies. He was thrown into prison in Cairo for two months and then in the Alexandria jail for a few more months. While there he befriended a Christian cellmate, Fáris Effendi, who soon becomes a Bahá'í. [BKG248, 265–6; EB268; GPB178]
  • Fáris Effendi was probably the first Christian to become a Bahá'í. [RB3:10, “Nabil-e aʿzam Zaranadi, Mollā Mohammad,” by Vahid Rafati, Encyclopædia Iranica]
  • See BKG265–8 for an account of Nabíl's arrest and imprisonment.
  • After his release he travelled to Cyprus and Beirut and then joined the Bahá'u'lláh's exiled community in Akka in late October of 1969. He spent the last two decades of his life in that area. [“Nabil-e aʿzam Zaranadi, Mollā Mohammad,” by Vahid Rafati, Encyclopædia Iranica]
Cairo; Egypt Nabil-i-Azam; Haji Mirza Haydar-Ali; Faris Effendi; Imprisonments; First believers by background; Christianity; Conversion; Interfaith dialogue
1880. Early 1880s The first Zoroastrians become Bahá'ís, in Persia. [SBBH2:67]
  • For information on these converts see SBBR2:67–93.
Iran Zoroastrianism; Conversion
1886 In the year Birth of Narayan Rao Sethji Vakil, the first Hindu to become a Bahá'í in Surat, Gujarat, India. Surat; Gujarat; India Narayan Rao Sethji Vakil; Births and deaths; First believers by background; Conversion; Hinduism; Interfaith dialogue
1890 Ibrahim George Kheiralla (Khayru'lláh) becomes a Bahá'í in Cairo under the tutelage of `Abdu'l-Karím-i-Tihrání. [BFA1:19]
  • It is probable that he is the first Bahá'í from Syrian Christian background. [BFA19]
  • See BFA1:175 for pictures.
Cairo; Egypt Ibrahim George Kheiralla; First believers by background; Christianity; Conversion; Interfaith dialogue
1890 A number of people of the Jewish, Zoroastrian and Buddhist Faiths become Bahá'ís. [BBR248–9; GPB195] Judaism; Jews; Zoroastrianism; Buddhism; Conversion; Interfaith dialogue
1936 31 Dec Khusraw Bimán (Thábit) passes away in Bombay at the age of 103 or 104. [I:56]
  • He is the first Zoroastrian to accept the Faith in India. [I:44–6]
  • For the story of his life see I:39–60.
Mumbai (Bombay); India Khusraw Biman; In Memoriam; First believers by background; Zoroastrianism; Conversion
1961 Jan - Feb Hand of the Cause of God Dr Rahmatu’lláh Muhájir travels to India and demonstrates the principle of mass teaching. [DM172–84; SBBH2:165–7]
  • Mass teaching begins in the rural area of Madhya Pradesh among the Hindu population. In 1961 there are 850 Bahá’ís; in 1963 87,000; by 1973 nearly 400,000; and by 1987 about two million. In 1983 45 per cent of all local spiritual assemblies are in India. [BBRSM195; BW13:299]
Madhya Pradesh; India Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Activities; Rahmatullah Muhajir; Mass conversion; Mass teaching; Teaching; LSA; Statistics; Growth
1961 8 Jul The Custodians announce that mass conversion has begun in Ceylon, Central and East Africa, and Bolivia, while in Canada native peoples have begun to enter the Faith. [MC293] Sri Lanka; Africa; Bolivia; Canada Custodians; Mass conversion; Native Americans; First Nations
1962 Thirty thousand new Bahá’ís enrol in India in six months. [VV9] India Mass conversion
1968 Over a thousand new believers enrol in Ethiopia. [BW15:186] Ethiopia Mass conversion
1970 - early 1971 Over 20,000 Afro-Americans from the rural areas of the south-eastern United States become Bahá’ís. [BBRSM187] United States Mass conversion
1970 Apr - Aug More than 6,000 people become Bahá’ís in Bolivia. [BW15:232] Bolivia Mass conversion
1970 May One thousand Guajiro Indians become Bahá’ís in Venezuela. [BW15:241] Venezuela Native Americans; Mass conversion
1971 Over 500 people become Bahá’ís in Bangladesh. [BINS86] Bangladesh Mass conversion
1971 27 – 30 Aug The first Bahá’í Youth Conference for Western Asia takes place in New Delhi. [BW15:335]
  • Two thousand people enrol during the conference and the week following. [BW15:335]
New Delhi; India; Asia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences; Mass conversion
1988 Jun Over 100,000 people, including large numbers of women, youth and families, become Bahá’ís in Uttar Pradesh, India. [BINS179:4] Uttar Pradesh; India Mass conversion
1988 Sep A teaching project in Maddhya Pradesh, India, enrols 20,000 new Bahá’ís in Morena District. [BINS185:4] Madhya Pradesh; India Mass teaching; Mass conversion
1988 Oct In the State of Orissa, India, 2,600 people become Bahá’ís and 16 new local spiritual assemblies are formed in 15 days. Orissa; India LSA; Mass teaching; Mass conversion
1988 Oct One hundred and twenty people in Hong Kong and 280 in Macau become Bahá’ís as a result of teaching institutes. [BINS189:8]
  • A later report states that more than 600 people in Macau have become Bahá’ís. [BINS194:3]
Hong Kong; Macau Teaching Institutes; Mass conversion
1988 Nov - Dec One thousand one hundred people become Bahá’ís in the State of Gujarat, India. [BINS190:5] Gujarat; India Mass conversion
1988 Nov - Dec Six hundred people become Bahá’ís in West Bengal and 5,150 in Orissa, India. [BINS189:4–5] West Bengal; Orissa; India Mass conversion
1988 Nov - 1989 Feb Teaching projects are launched in the Philippines, resulting in 3,847 people becoming Bahá’ís. [BINS195:4] Philippines Mass conversion
1988 26 Nov - 4 Dec Over a thousand people become Bahá’ís in Bolivia during a teaching project. [BINS189:2]
  • A later report indicates that over 2,000 people have become Bahá’ís. [BINS195:1]
Bolivia Mass conversion
1989 Oct - Nov In India, 4,300 people become Bahá’ís in the State of Orissa. [BINS213:3] Orissa; India Mass conversion
1993 In the year More than 10,000 people become Bahá'ís in Bangladesh. [BINS318:8; BINS319:1] Bangladesh Mass conversion
1995 Aug More than 7,000 people become Bahá'ís in Haiti in two weeks. [BINS348:3] Haiti Mass conversion

from the main catalogue

  1. Bahá'í Faith: Prophecy and Conversion, by Brian J. Mistler (2001). Results of a field study of Baha'is in the United States and Australia which demonstrate that family connections and social teachings are greater incentives to conversion than prophecy is. [about]
  2. Bahá'í Faith and Traditional Societies, The: Exploring Universes of Discourse, by Moojan Momen, in dialogue magazine, 1:4 (1987). How misunderstandings can arise between pioneers and the cultures they've moved to; traditional vs. modern ways of communication, and the dynamics of conversion. [about]
  3. Bahá'ísm: History, Transfiguration, Doxa, by Hutan Hejazi Martinez (2010). An outsider's view of the role of ideologies in a postmodern era, focusing on Baha'i history, conversion narratives, ideology, and other competing philosophies. (Link to thesis, offsite.) [about]
  4. Conversion: to Bábí and Bahá'í Faiths, by Juan Cole, in Encyclopaedia Iranica, Volume 6 (1993). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  5. Conversion Movements within Hindu Village Culture, by Susan Maneck (1997). Hindu, Christian, and Baha'i conversion patterns in India. [about]
  6. Conversion of Religious Minorities to the Bahá'í Faith in Iran: Some Preliminary Observations, by Susan Maneck, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:3 (1990). Conversion patterns of Zoroastrians and Jews in the period 1877-1921. [about]
  7. Conversion of the Great-Uncle of the Báb, The, by Ahang Rabbani, in World Order, 30:3 (1999). The history of Hájí Mírzá Sayyid Muhammad (1798-1876), maternal uncle of the Bab. [about]
  8. Conversion, Transformation, and Sacrifice in the Revelation of The Bab, by Peter Ashelman (2001). Hermeneutics in early Babi/Baha'i history and its relationship to conversion, and the historical evolution of the world Bahá’í community since its origins. [about]
  9. Diné Becoming Baha'i: Through the Lens of Ancient Prophecies, by Linda S. Covey (2011). Some Diné (Navajo) convert to the Baha'i Faith because it fulfills their ancient prophecies, its institutions provide autonomy and empower the Diné people, and Baha'i values of cultural diversity allow Diné to practice their traditional ways. [about]
  10. Enrollments and limited growth of the Bahá'í community, by Universal House of Justice (2002). The lack of significant numerical growth in certain Western Baha'i communities is related to the preceding decades of struggle, achievement and disappointment. [about]
  11. Entry by Troops, Promoting, by Shoghi Effendi and Universal House of Justice, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 3 (2000). [about]
  12. Falta de crecimiento y el cambio de cultura, La, by Universal House of Justice (2002). [about]
  13. From Iran East and West, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 2 (1984). [about]
  14. Jewish Conversion to the Bahá'í Faith, by Moshe Sharon. [about]
  15. Judeo-Persian Communities of Iran in the Qajar Period: Conversion to the Bahá'í Faith, by Mehrdad Amanat, in Encyclopaedia Iranica (2009). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  16. Messages from the Universal House of Justice 1963-1986: Third Epoch of the Formative Age, by Universal House of Justice (1996). [about]
  17. Navajo Tradition, The: Transition to the Bahá'í Faith, by Linda S. Covey, in Images, imaginations, and beyond: proceedings of the 8th Native American Symposium, November 2009, ed. Mark B. Spencer (2010). Examines three reasons behind the conversion of some Navajo to Baha'i in the early 1960s: fulfillment of prophecy, cultural empowerment and autonomy, and protection of traditional practices. [about]
  18. Necessary History, A: Teaching On and Off The Reservations, by Linda S. Covey, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). On the early Bahá’í literature directed toward Native Americans; history of Bahá’í conversion activities with Indigenous populations; and the work conducted by the Central States Regional American Indian Teaching. [about]
  19. Persian Stronghold of Zoroastrianism, A, by Mary Boyce (1977). Brief mention of Baha'i converts to Zoroastrianism in Yazd. [about]
  20. Promoting Entry by Troops: Study Guide, by Robert McClelland (1994). Study guide for the statement by the House and their compilation "Promoting Entry by Troops." [about]
  21. Proselytizing, Development, and the Covenant, by Universal House of Justice, in Messages from the Universal House of Justice: 1963-1986, The Third Epoch of the Formative Age (1996). Teaching vs. proselytization; applying Baha'i social teachings without becoming ensnared in prevailing cultural mores; and the uniqueness of the Baha'i covenant. [about]
  22. Questions of Haji Mirza Siyyid Ali Muhammad occasioning the Revelation of the Kitab-i-Iqan, by Haji Mirza Siyyid Ali Muhammad (1997). Translation of the questions submitted to Baha'u'llah by Haji Mirza Siyyid Muhammad, the maternal uncle of the Bab, which led to the revelation of the Kitab-i Iqan. [about]
  23. Tablet to Rad'ar-Rúh, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). Raḍ’ar-Rúḥ, a believer from Mashad, received this tablet shortly after Baha'u'llah arrived in Akka. In it, Baha'u'llah describes being pleased about the recent declaration of Christian doctor named Faris. [about]
  24. Women and Religious Change: A case study in the colonial migrant experience, by Miriam Dixson, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). The story of Margaret Dixson, and one woman's growth from Anglicanism, via numerology and astrology, to commitment to the world ideals of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
 
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