Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.

Search for tag "Diversity"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1972 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Nepal is formed with its seat in Kathmandu. [BW15:249]
  • For pictures see BW15:155, 248.
  • With Hand of the Cause Ali-Akbar Furutan representing the Universal House of Justice, the Bahá'ís of Nepal held their first national convention to elect their National Spiritual Assembly in 1972 during the reign of King Mahendra. The convention had forty delegates. The members of the first national assembly were: Amar Pradhan, Shyam Maherjan, Jujubhai Sakya, Aranda Lal Shrestha, Dinesh Verma, Keith de Folo, W. F. Chaittonalla, P. N. Rai, D. K. Malla - from Buddhist, Hindu, Christian backgrounds. [Religion in Nepal website]
Kathmandu; Nepal NSA; Cultural diversity
1993 Oct The Australian Bahá'í community and the Arrente Aboriginal tribe co-sponsor an intercultural celebration of indigenous peoples, ‘Heart of Australia Calling' in Alice Springs to mark UN International Year for the World's Indigenous Peoples. [BW93–4:90] Alice Springs; Australia Indigenous people; Cultural diversity; United Nations
2000 22 - 26 May The United Nations Millennium Forum was held at United Nations Headquarters in New York. It attracted 1,350 participants from more than 106 countries and many others participated remotely via Internet. The purpose was to give organizations of civil society an opportunity to formulate views and recommendations on global issues to be taken up at the subsequent Millennium Summit in September to be attended by heads of state and government. Convened by the UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the Forum's overarching theme - "The United Nations for the 21st Century" - encompassed six main sub-themes in its declaration: 1) Peace, security and disarmament; 2) Eradication of poverty, including debt cancellation and social development; 3) Human rights; 4) Sustainable development and environment; 5) Facing the challenges of globalization: achieving equity, justice and diversity; and, 6) Strengthening and democratizing the United Nations and international organizations. The document was divided into three main areas: recommendations for governmental action; proposals for the United Nations; and actions to be undertaken by civil society itself. The Bahá’í International Community as an NGO representing a cross-section of humankind acted as a unifying agent in major discussions. Our principal representative at the United Nations, Techeste Ahderrom, was appointed to cochair a committee of non-governmental organizations. Lawrence Arturo and Diane 'Alá'í represented the Bahá'í International Community. [BW00-01p87-89, Letter from the Universal House of Justice dated 24 September 2000] New York; United States United Nations Millennium Forum and Summit; United Nations; United Nations Summits; United Nations conferences; Conferences; Millennium; Bahai International Community; Peace; Security; Disarmament; Poverty; Social and economic development; Human rights; Sustainable development; environment; Globalization; Justice; Diversity; Prosperity; Equality; Solidarity; Tolerance; Nature; Cooperation; Interfaith dialogue; Techeste Ahderom; Lawrence Arturo; Diane Alai
2000 6 - 8 Sep The General Assembly Millennium Summit was held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York and was attended by leaders of more than 150 nations. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan presented a report entitled, "We The Peoples: The Role of the United Nations in the 21st Century". In which was presented an overview of the challenges facing humankind and suggested practical solutions. Some of the key themes addressed include health, environment, human rights and other social issues, international law, peace and rejuvenating the United Nations. It is striking that called upon by the Secretary-General of the United Nations to address so historic a gathering was Mr. Techeste Ahderom, the principal representative of the Bahá’í International Community to the United Nations, addressed the gathering as the spokesman of civil society. He was accorded this honour because he had presided as cochair at the earlier United Nations Millennium Forum. After all the national leaders had spoken and before the Summit had adopted its declaration on 8 September, Mr. Ahderom made a speech in which he conveyed to that unprecedented assemblage a report of the Forum. The text of his speech is enclosed herewith. On the last day a declaration was unanimously adopted that began by asserting: “We, Heads of State and Government, have gathered at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 6 to 8 September 2000, at the dawn of a new Millennium, to reaffirm our faith in the Organization and its Charter as indispensable foundations of a more peaceful, prosperous and just world.” [BW00-01p91-93, Letter from the Universal House of Justice dated 24 September 2000]
  • The text of Ahderom's speech can be found on the BIC's website and at BW00-01p243-247.
New York; United States United Nations Millennium Forum and Summit; United Nations; United Nations Summits; United Nations conferences; Conferences; Millennium; Bahai International Community; Peace; Security; Disarmament; Poverty; Social and economic development; Human rights; Sustainable development; environment; Globalization; Justice; Diversity; Prosperity; Equality; Solidarity; Tolerance; Nature; Cooperation; Interfaith dialogue; Techeste Ahderom
2013 20 Sep Deloria Bighorn, chairperson of the National Spiritual Bahá'ís of Canada, presented, on behalf of the Bahá'í Community of Canada, a submission to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission at the BC National Event held in Vancouver from September 18th to the 21st. The formal presentation followed a panel organized by the Canadian Baha’i Community and Reconciliation Canada. The previous week 250 people listened to Chief Doug White, Chief Dr. Robert Joseph, and Dr. Paulette Regan from the Commission discussing the challenge of reconciliation. [T&R website, CBN 24 September, CBN 9 February, 2018, BWNS1248] Vancouver; Canada Native Americans; Indigenous people; Reconciliation; Cultural diversity; Human rights; Documentaries; BWNS

from the main catalogue

  1. African Culture, Traditional, Aspects of, by Universal House of Justice (1998). Challenges and opportunities in the African continent; eliminating prejudices; dance and music; alcohol; hunting; initiation rites; the supernatural; tribal leadership; status of women. [about]
  2. Alain Locke and Cultural Pluralism, by Christopher Buck, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought (2004). [about]
  3. Bahá'í Communities in the Asia-Pacific: Performing Common Theology and Cultural Diversity on a 'Spiritual Axis', by Graham Hassall and William Barnes (1998). [about]
  4. Bahá'í Community of Canada, The: A Case Study in the Transplantation of Non-Western Religious Movements to Western Societies, by Will C. van den Hoonaard, in Origins of the Bahá'í Community of Canada, 1898-1948 (1996). [about]
  5. Bahá'í Faith and Religious Diversity, by Phillip R. Smith, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 1:1 (1991). The Bahá'í principal of unity in diversity as applied to religious pluralism. [about]
  6. Bahá'í Faith and Traditional Societies, The: Exploring Universes of Discourse, by Moojan Momen, in dialogue magazine, 1:4 (1987). How misunderstandings can arise between pioneers and the cultures they've moved to; traditional vs. modern ways of communication, and the dynamics of conversion. [about]
  7. Bahá'í-Inspired Perspectives on Human Rights (2001). Articles by Kiser Barnes, Greg Duly, Cheshmak Farhoumand-Sims, Graham Hassall, Darren Hedley, Nazila Ghanea-Hercock, Chichi Layor, Michael Penn, Martha Schweitz, and Albert Lincoln. [about]
  8. Building Intercultural Community: Insights from Indigenous Bahá'í History, by Chelsea Horton, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). Bridging Baha'i communities with Indigenous populations in Canada and the United States was not easy, and was especially fraught for native believers, who also confronted tensions of intercultural understanding and sometimes outright racism. [about]
  9. Continuities and Discontinuities in Islamic Perspectives on Cultural Diversity, by Sulayman S. Nyang (1999). Contains only brief mention of Baha'is, but discusses the Iranian Revolution and related topics. [about]
  10. Conversive Turn in Bahá'í Scripture, The: An Intersubjective Communications Model for Bridging Global Diversity, by Susan Berry Brill de Ramirez, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 17:1-5 (2007). Communications which manifest equality of participants bring diverse persons and elements of the world together. Baha'i consultation exemplifies the capacity of language to transform the world through the unifying power of interpersonal connections. [about]
  11. Cultural Diversity in the Age of Maturity, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 3 (2000). [about]
  12. Cultural Pluralism in the Bahá'í Community, by Peggy Caton, in dialogue magazine, 1:1 (1986). The idea of relative truth implies a situational approach to living. Baha'i teachings encourage both diversity and harmonious co-existence. [about]
  13. Cultural Reconciliation in Canada, by Universal House of Justice, in Baha'i Canada, 13:2 (2000). The Universal House of Justice suggests to the National Spiritual Assembly of Canada that their efforts at unity and reconciliation should focus on culture rather than on race. [about]
  14. Cultural Reconciliation in Canada - questions, by Universal House of Justice (2001). Reply from the House of Justice to a request for a reexamination of the assumptions on which its letter to Canada of 5 September 1999 was based. [about]
  15. Dancing in the Haziratu'l-Quds, by Universal House of Justice (1987). Recreational dancing in a temple is not appropriate, but cultural and devotional dancing is acceptable. [about]
  16. Demographics of the United States National Spiritual Assembly, by Archives Office of the United States Bahá'í National Center (2016). Percentage of women, African-Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Latino Americans serving on the U.S. and Canadian NSAs from 1922-2015. [about]
  17. Diné Becoming Baha'i: Through the Lens of Ancient Prophecies, by Linda S. Covey (2011). Some Diné (Navajo) convert to the Baha'i Faith because it fulfills their ancient prophecies, its institutions provide autonomy and empower the Diné people, and Baha'i values of cultural diversity allow Diné to practice their traditional ways. [about]
  18. Duty of Kindness and Sympathy Towards Strangers, The, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). Integrating immigrants into the culture of their new country is becoming a focus in some Western states. In 2007 the Italian government issued a “Charter on the Values and Significance of Citizenship and Integration,” which reflects such Baha'i ideals. [about]
  19. Electoral Process, Bahá'í: Clarifications, and Three Way Tie, by Universal House of Justice (2012). How to resolve a 3-way tie when 2 parties are minorities; when voting, should one consider age distribution, diversity, and gender. [about]
  20. Emblems of Faithfulness: Pluralism in Meaning and Beauty in the Ordinary, by Helen Cheng and Catherine Nash, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:3 (2015). Memorials of the Faithful is notable for the diversity of personalities described, and the sheer ordinariness of many of those remembered lives. These two aspects of the text highlight some of the broader questions raised by the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  21. Exploring Universes of Discourse: The Meeting of the Bahá'í Faith and Traditional Society, by Moojan Momen, in dialogue magazine, 1:4 (1987). To communicate, people need to share not just a common language; there must also be a common framework for understanding, a "universe of discourse." Baha'i pioneers must bridge cultural and linguistic divides when imparting the teachings of the Faith. [about]
  22. From Moorish Cordova to the Bahá'ís of Iran: Islamic Tolerance and Intolerance, by Boris Handal Morales, in IDEA: A Journal of Social Issues, 12:1 (2007). Though Baha'is are persecuted in Iran, Muhammad taught understanding and respect towards religious minorities. Cordova, Spain is an example of historical tolerance where Muslims, Christians and Jews co-existed harmoniously under Islamic rule. [about]
  23. Hindu Concept of God, The: Unity in Diversity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The fundamental unity behind Hindu concepts of God and those found in the Semitic traditions, and the principle of unity in diversity, allow Hindu and Baha'i beliefs to come together and further their common goal of uniting the world's religions. [about]
  24. Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith, by Moojan Momen (1990). An attempt to explore the relationship between Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith and to explain the Bahá'í Faith to those who are from a Hindu background. [about]
  25. Identidad y Paz, by Quentin Farrand, in Derecho y Cambio Social, 19:6 (2009). Estimular la apreciación de la diversidad de caracteres, talentos, y personalidades que encontramos en todos los grupos étnicos, de clase, nacionales, y de creencias, y desalentar el adoctrinamiento de aversión y contienda entre estos segmentos. [about]
  26. Individual Bahá'í Perspective on Spiritual Aspects of Cultural Diversity and Sustainable Development: Towards a Second Enlightenment, by Chris Jones Kavelin, in The International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities, and Nations, 8:1 (2008). This paper discusses the spiritual value of cultural diversity and explores how such reflection impacts development policy on the local, national and international levels. [about]
  27. Interreligious and Intercultural Cooperation, by Bahá'í International Community (2007). Statement to the United Nations on best practices and strategies for interreligious and intercultural cooperation. [about]
  28. Ireland's Multi-Ethnic Immigration Challenge: An Irish Bahá'í View, by Eamonn Moane, in Solas, 2 (2002). After centuries of population loss, Ireland’s economic success in the 1990s led to a surge of immigration, but its reaction to a multi-ethnic influx has been disappointing. It needs Baha'i approaches like consultation, tolerance, fairness, and morality. [about]
  29. Learning from History, by Moojan Momen, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
  30. Millennium Forum, by Universal House of Justice (2000). [about]
  31. Native American Vision and the Teachings of 'Abdu'l-Baha, by Paula Bidwell (2011). Presentation addressing issues of concern to Native Americans, cast in the light of statements of Abdu'l-Baha from his 1912 visit to the United States. [about]
  32. Navajo Tradition, The: Transition to the Bahá'í Faith, by Linda S. Covey, in Images, imaginations, and beyond: proceedings of the 8th Native American Symposium, November 2009, ed. Mark B. Spencer (2010). Examines three reasons behind the conversion of some Navajo to Baha'i in the early 1960s: fulfillment of prophecy, cultural empowerment and autonomy, and protection of traditional practices. [about]
  33. Necessary History, A: Teaching On and Off The Reservations, by Linda S. Covey, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). On the early Bahá’í literature directed toward Native Americans; history of Bahá’í conversion activities with Indigenous populations; and the work conducted by the Central States Regional American Indian Teaching. [about]
  34. New Skin For An Old Drum, A: Changing Contexts of Yukon Aboriginal Bahá'í Storytelling, by Lynn Echevarria-Howe, in Northern Review, 29 (2008). On the construction of the religious self through the storytelling processes of Yukon Aboriginal Bahá’ís: how do people put together stories to construct their contemporary Bahá’í identity? [about]
  35. Not Just for Consumers: An Argument for Depicting Diverse Beliefs on U.S. Television, by Deborah Clark Vance, in Diversity and Mass Communication: Evidence of Impact, ed. Amber Reetz Narro and Alice C. Ferguson (2007). [about]
  36. Persian-speaking Believers in Anglophone Communities, by Universal House of Justice, in Bahá'í Canada, 8:6 (1996). Some Persian expatriates feel deprived of participation in Baha'i gatherings because of an inability to understand English. [about]
  37. Pioneering, Language, Arts, Example of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Universal House of Justice (1998). Pioneering; Serving parents; Serving where need is; Gardens; International Auxiliary Language; Arabic pronunciation; study of Persian; Some references in Writings of Baha'u'llah; Folk art; External affairs; Daily living; Abdu'l-Baha as divine exemplar. [about]
  38. Protection of Diversity in the World Order of Baha'u'llah, The, by Bahá'í World Centre Office of Public Information, in dialogue magazine, 2:2-3 (1988). Statement dated December 29, 1985, released by the Baha'i International Community's Office of Public Information following the broadcast of a BBC program on the Baha'i Faith in 1985. [about]
  39. Return of the Dreamtime, by Pym Trueman, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). Brief history of Christianity and missionary work in Samoa and Australia, and how native Samoan customs and beliefs were changed or lost. [about]
  40. Same Yet Different, The: Bahá'í Perspectives on Achieving Unity out of Difference, by Deborah Clark Vance (2002). [about]
  41. Same Yet Different, The: Creating Unity Among the Diverse Members of the Bahá'í Faith, by Deborah Clark Vance, in Journal of Intergroup Relations (a publication of the National Association of Human Rights Workers), Volume 29:4 (2002). [about]
  42. Special Report on Baha'i Burial vs. Maori Custom, by National Spiritual Assembly of New Zealand (1989). Special report about reconciling Baha'i burial laws with local maori customs where they conflict; includes guidance from the Universal House of Justice. [about]
  43. Unity and Progressive Revelation: Comparing Bahá'í Principles with the Basic Concepts of Teilhard de Chardin, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
  44. Unity in Diversity: Acceptance and Integration in an Era of Intolerance and Fragmentation, by Roxanne Lalonde (1994). Short excerpt from thesis, edited as a stand-alone article. [about]
  45. Unity in Diversity: Orientations and Strategies for Building a Harmonious Multicultural Society, by Michael Harris Bond (1998). Insights from the discipline of psychology can be used to design societies compatible with the exigencies and opportunities provided by the 21st Century. [about]
 
See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.
Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
.
. .