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Search for tag "Education"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1910 8 Jan The Persian-American Educational Society is inaugurated in Washington DC. [BFA2:XVII; 355–8]
  • Its primary purpose is to assist the Tarbíyat School in Iran. [BFA2:357]
Washington DC.; Iran Persian-American Educational Society; Tarbiyat School
1987 The establishment of the Bahá'í Institute for Higher Education (BIHE) to meet the educational needs of young people who had been systematically denied access to higher education by the Iranian government. [Closed Doors, Chapter IV] Iran Baha'i Institute for Higher Education; BIHE
1990 The International Exposition on Education for Peace sponsored by the National Spiritual Assembly was held in Brazil. Twenty-three embassies and educational institutes participated. [AWH88] Brazil International Exposition on Education for Peace; NSA
1990 The Bahá'í International Community was invited to participate in the World Conference on Education for All in Thailand because of its involvement in the work of the Task Force for Literacy under the aegis of UNESCO. [AWH75] Thailand Baha'i International Community; World Conference on Education for All; Task Force for Literacy; UNESCO
1990 4 Jun The first International Exposition on Education for Peace, inaugurated by the National Spiritual Assembly of Brazil, takes place in Brasilia. [BINS226:1] Brasilia; Brazil International Exposition Education Peace; National Assembly
1993 26 Nov The National Spiritual Assembly of the Marshall Islands signs a Memorandum of Understanding with the Majuro local government in which the operation of administration of five elementary schools is legally handed over to the National Spiritual Assembly. President Amata Kabua was the first head of state to respond to the Peace Statement of the Universal House of Justice. [BINS307:4–5; BW93–4:101, CBN Vol 7 no 1 May/June 1994 p29] Marshall Islands Education
1998 29 Sep Starting this date until October 2nd, in Iran, government raids on 500 private homes and the arrest of some 30 faculty members in efforts to close the Bahá’í Institute for Higher Education, a decentralized university that aimed to give Bahá’í students access to the education they have been otherwise denied.
  • The Institute offered Bachelor's degrees in ten subject areas: applied chemistry, biology, dental science, pharmacological science, civil engineering, computer science, psychology, law, literature and accounting. Within these subject areas, which were administered by five "departments," the Institute was able to offer more than 200 distinct courses each term.
  • In the beginning, courses were based on correspondence lessons developed by Indiana University, which was one of the first institutions in the West to recognize the Bahá'í Institute for Higher Education. Later on, course offerings were developed internally.
  • Teaching was done principally via correspondence, or, for specialized scientific and technical courses and in other special cases, in small-group classes that were usually held in private homes. Over time, however, the Institute was able to establish a few laboratories, operated in privately owned commercial buildings in and around Teheran, for computer science, physics, dental science, pharmacology, applied chemistry and language study. The operations of these laboratories were kept prudently quiet, with students cautioned not to come and go in large groups that might give the authorities a reason to object.
  • Among other significant human rights conventions, Iran is a party to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 16 December 1966. Parties to this Covenant "recognize the right of everyone to education" and more specifically that "higher education shall be made equally accessible to all, on the basis of capacity, by every appropriate means." [“The New York Times” article dated 29 October, 1998, One Country Oct-Dec 1998 Vol 10 Issue 3]
Iran Baha’i Institute for Higher Education; Iranian persecution; International Covenant on Economic; Social and Cultural Rights; UN General Assembly
2002 6 June City Montessori School in Lucknow, India wing the UNESCO Peace Education award in recognition of its efforts to promote the universal values of education for peace and tolerance and to renew the principles of secularism at a time when these values and principles are increasingly being challenged. The school was founded by Mr. Jagdish Gandhi and his wife Bharti in 1959 with only 5 students and has since earned a reputation for a high level of academic excellence — and for a distinctive program of moral and spiritual education. In 1999 the Guinness Book of World Records recognized City Montessori School as the world's largest school by enrollment. The school had some 22,000 students that year. In 2002 it had 26,000 students in grade levels ranging from pre-primary to college and in 2010-11 enrolment was 39,437. In 2014-14 it was over 47,000. Technically speaking, CMS is not so much a school as a school district, with some 20 branches spread throughout Lucknow. [CMS site, BWNS165, BWNS146, One CountryVol.14,Issue 1] Lucknow; India; UNESCO Peace Education award; UNESCO; Jagdish Gandhi; Bharti Gandhi; School; City Montessori School
2014 Sep The exclusion of Shadan Shirazi, an exemplary student who placed exceptionally well in the college entrance exams administered to students throughout Iran. The Iranian government deployed new tactics in their treatment of Bahá'í students to deny them access to higher education without raising the concern of the international community. The new procedure entails identifying Bahá'í university applicants and then calling them in so they can quietly be confirmed as ineligible under the government's unjust policies and then be sent away without any documentation or proof that it was because they are Bahá'ís that they were prevented from enrolling. [BWNS1021] Shadan Shirazi; denial of education
2017. 4 Nov Three young Iranians who complained to state officials after being denied university entrance for being followers of the Bahá'í Faith have each been sentenced to five years in prison. Rouhieh Safajoo (21), Sarmad Shadabi (22), and Tara Houshmand (21) were convicted of the charges of “membership in the anti-state Baha’i cult” and “publishing falsehoods.” [IFMAT 14NOV17] Tehran Education denied

from the main catalogue

  1. A Way Out of No Way, by Hussein Ahdieh and Hillary Chapman: Review, by Donald T. Streets, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies (2017). [about]
  2. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Encounter with Modernity during His Western Travels, by Wendi Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Abdu'l-Baha's responses to the West's technology and innovations on the one hand, vs. its archaic racist and sexual philosophies on the other. [about]
  3. Advancing in Bahá'í-inspired Education, by Sona Farid-Arbab, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:4 (2016). A number of diverse educators labor in diverse cultural and ecological settings to identify educational needs, develop elements of a coherent pedagogy, and create a series of teaching-learning experience, in light of Baha'u'llah's vision for humanity. [about]
  4. Bahá'í Education for Children: A Teacher's Guide, by Ali-Akbar Furutan (1999). A series of six books on teaching children, organized by age. [about]
  5. Bahá'í Education: Sources of Guidance (2007). A lengthy compilation covering many subjects of interest to parents, teachers, and students, such as education principles, curricula, pedagogy, psychology, gender, infants, and institutions. [about]
  6. Baha'i Religious History: Introduction, by Todd Lawson, in Journal of Religious History, 36:4 (2012). Introduction to a special issue of this journal titled "Baha'i History," summarizing the prophetic record, the divine hierarchy of history, and the primacy of science and education. [about]
  7. Bahá'í Schools, by Vahid Rafati, in Encyclopaedia Iranica, Volume 3 (1989). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  8. Breastfeeding and the Bahá'í Faith, by Haig V. Setrakian and Marc B. Rosenman, in Breastfeeding Medicine, 6:4 (2011). The Writings reference breast-feeding literally and symbolically, and provide guidance as to its practice. As the ideal form of infant nutrition, breastfeeding women are exempted from fasting, and it is linked to childhood moral development. [about]
  9. Charter for Bahá'í Schools, A, by Stephen Waite and National Spiritual Assembly of India, in Bahá'í National Review, 128 (1990). Basic principles which may guide the development of Bahá'í schools and other educational projects [about]
  10. Conferencia Mundial del Año Internacional de la Mujer: Declaración presentada por la Comunidad Internacional Bahá'í, by Bahá'í International Community. Declaración presentada por la Comunidad Internacional Bahá’í (en carácter consultivo con el Consejo Económico y Social — Categoría II) Ciudad de México, México, 1975 [about]
  11. Divine Education: The Root of Knowledge, by Abu'l-Qasim Faizi, in Glory: A Bahá'í Youth Magazine, 5:2 (1973). On Baha'i families and raising children to appreciate Baha'i principles. [about]
  12. Education and the Supreme Talisman in the Kitáb-i-Íqán, by Melissa Tansik (1999). How the Kitab-i-Iqan can be seen as a compendium of what humankind needs to know; a discussion of perception as it relates to learning what is needful; intellectual honesty; and the results of various learning experiences. [about]
  13. Education of women and socio-economic development, by Geeta Gandhi Kingdon, in Reason and Revelation: Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions, volume 13 (2002). The findings of recent research on the social and the economic benefits of female education, which provides insights as to why Bahá'u'lláh stressed its importance. [about]
  14. Education, Bahá'í, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 1 (1991). [about]
  15. Education, Bahá'í: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1994). [about]
  16. Exploring Learning Processes within a Collaborative Study Circle: Cultural-historical activity theory perspective on individual and social transformation, by Jean-Marie Nau (2012). Processes of learning in communities outside school-related education; Baha'i theories of how education can express humans as noble beings; knowledge as a manifestation of social reality; teleological history; humanity as an organically evolving entity. [about]
  17. Family in Baha'i Society, The: A Unique Approach to Curriculum Development, by Stephen Hall, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). [about]
  18. Montessori and the Bahá'í Faith, by Barbara Hacker, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:2 (1988). [about]
  19. Organic Order, An: An Approach to the Philosophy of Baha'u'llah through the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Roger Coe, in The Vision of Shoghi Effendi (1993). The structure of the Administrative Order as outlined by the writings of the Guardian, and the principles of the Anisa model of education. Available also as an audiobook. [about]
  20. Papel de la educación, los medios de información y las artes en el desarrollo social, El, by Bahá'í International Community. El papel de la educación, los medios de información [about]
  21. Pastoral Care of Bahá'í Children: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1995). [about]
  22. Principles and Practices of Curriculum Design and Development, by Farzam Arbab (2004). [about]
  23. Raising Children of Light: editorial, by Bahá'í International Community, in Jerusalem Post (2008). [about]
  24. Role of Education in Building Material and Spiritual Education, The, by Farzam Arbab (2004). [about]
  25. Schools owned by Bahá'ís and "Bahá'í schools", by Universal House of Justice (1994). Are schools owned by or run by Baha'is always considered "Baha'i" schools, and does the word "Baha'i" always appear in their title? [about]
  26. Spiritual Education of Children (in Russian and English), by William S. Hatcher (2008). Fireside talk given in English, with Russian translation. [about]
  27. Unrestrained as the Wind: A Life Dedicated to Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Compilation of quotations on topics of especial interest to Bahá'í youth. [about]
  28. Youth in Every Land, to, by Universal House of Justice, in Wellspring of Guidance (1966). Three fields of service open to young Baha'is: improving their personal character, teaching the Faith to others, and preparing for their later years through education. [about]
 
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