Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "Globalization"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
2000 22 - 26 May The United Nations Millennium Forum was held at United Nations Headquarters in New York. It attracted 1,350 participants from more than 106 countries and many others participated remotely via Internet. The purpose was to give organizations of civil society an opportunity to formulate views and recommendations on global issues to be taken up at the subsequent Millennium Summit in September to be attended by heads of state and government. Convened by the UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the Forum's overarching theme - "The United Nations for the 21st Century" - encompassed six main sub-themes in its declaration: 1) Peace, security and disarmament; 2) Eradication of poverty, including debt cancellation and social development; 3) Human rights; 4) Sustainable development and environment; 5) Facing the challenges of globalization: achieving equity, justice and diversity; and, 6) Strengthening and democratizing the United Nations and international organizations. The document was divided into three main areas: recommendations for governmental action; proposals for the United Nations; and actions to be undertaken by civil society itself. The Bahá’í International Community as an NGO representing a cross-section of humankind acted as a unifying agent in major discussions. Our principal representative at the United Nations, Techeste Ahderrom, was appointed to cochair a committee of non-governmental organizations. Lawrence Arturo and Diane 'Alá'í represented the Bahá'í International Community. [BW00-01p87-89, Letter from the Universal House of Justice dated 24 September 2000] New York; United States United Nations Millennium Forum and Summit; United Nations; United Nations Summits; United Nations conferences; Conferences; Millennium; Bahai International Community; Peace; Security; Disarmament; Poverty; Social and economic development; Human rights; Sustainable development; environment; Globalization; Justice; Diversity; Prosperity; Equality; Solidarity; Tolerance; Nature; Cooperation; Interfaith dialogue; Techeste Ahderom; Lawrence Arturo; Diane Alai
2000 6 - 8 Sep The General Assembly Millennium Summit was held at the United Nations Headquarters in New York and was attended by leaders of more than 150 nations. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan presented a report entitled, "We The Peoples: The Role of the United Nations in the 21st Century". In which was presented an overview of the challenges facing humankind and suggested practical solutions. Some of the key themes addressed include health, environment, human rights and other social issues, international law, peace and rejuvenating the United Nations. It is striking that called upon by the Secretary-General of the United Nations to address so historic a gathering was Mr. Techeste Ahderom, the principal representative of the Bahá’í International Community to the United Nations, addressed the gathering as the spokesman of civil society. He was accorded this honour because he had presided as cochair at the earlier United Nations Millennium Forum. After all the national leaders had spoken and before the Summit had adopted its declaration on 8 September, Mr. Ahderom made a speech in which he conveyed to that unprecedented assemblage a report of the Forum. The text of his speech is enclosed herewith. On the last day a declaration was unanimously adopted that began by asserting: “We, Heads of State and Government, have gathered at United Nations Headquarters in New York from 6 to 8 September 2000, at the dawn of a new Millennium, to reaffirm our faith in the Organization and its Charter as indispensable foundations of a more peaceful, prosperous and just world.” [BW00-01p91-93, Letter from the Universal House of Justice dated 24 September 2000]
  • The text of Ahderom's speech can be found on the BIC's website and at BW00-01p243-247.
New York; United States United Nations Millennium Forum and Summit; United Nations; United Nations Summits; United Nations conferences; Conferences; Millennium; Bahai International Community; Peace; Security; Disarmament; Poverty; Social and economic development; Human rights; Sustainable development; environment; Globalization; Justice; Diversity; Prosperity; Equality; Solidarity; Tolerance; Nature; Cooperation; Interfaith dialogue; Techeste Ahderom

from the main catalogue

  1. Addressing the Rising Tide of Globalization and Amorality in the Present World Order and Its Implications on Extremes of Wealth and Poverty, by Rama Ayman, in Lights of Irfan, 17 (2016). On inequality within most nations in the world at a time when wealth disparity between nations has been falling; the impact that amorality and globalization have on wealth inequality; Baha'i teachings on alleviating extremes of wealth and poverty. [about]
  2. Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). Articles from a conference held at the University of Copenhagen in 2001. [about]
  3. Bahá'í Faith and Globalization 1900-1912, The, by Robert Stockman, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). Abdu’l-Baha’s thinking inspired much of the practice of Baha’i proselytising; overview of the practical activism of the early American Baha’is and the mutual bonds of assistance between the Baha’i communities of North America and Iran. [about]
  4. Bahá'ísm: Some Uncertainties about its Role as a Globalizing Religion, by Denis MacEoin, in Bahá'í and Globalisation, ed. Margit Warburg (2005). On Baha'i self-understanding as the religion to unite all faiths in the culmination of globalisation, vs. the challenges which secular values present to a religion that, rooted in Islamic thinking, aims to fuse the spheres of religion and society. [about]
  5. Canadian Bahá'ís 1938-2000, The: Construction of Oneness in Personal and Collective Identity, by Lynn Echevarria-Howe, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). On how globalization includes greater consciousness of the whole world, and a sociological perspective on how this consciousness has been nurtured within the Canadian Baha'i community. [about]
  6. Changing Reality: The Bahá'í Community and the Creation of a New Reality, by Moojan Momen, in História Questões & Debates, 43 (2005). [about]
  7. Discourse, Identity, and Global Citizenship, by Michael Karlberg, in Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 20:3 (2008). What does it mean to be a "global citizen"? From early Greek times, the concept of citizenship expanded from "inhabitant of a city" to a democratic ideal of self-determination. It now includes global relationships, interdependence, and altruism. [about]
  8. Economic Justice and the Creation of a New International Economic Order, by Keith Suter, in 75 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Australasia (1996). The "New Right," history of economic philosophy and the role of the Church in Europe, challenges of the global economy, the failure of the UN to deal with the problems of the globalized economy, and how NGOs and individuals can work for economic justice. [about]
  9. Eschatology of Globalization, The: The Multiple Messiahship of Bahá'u'lláh Revisited, by Christopher Buck, in Numen Book Series: Studies in Modern Religions, Religious Movements and the Babi-Bahá'í Faiths, ed. Moshe Sharon (2004). This paper argues that Baha'u'llah's signal contribution to globalization was to ethicize and sacralize it. [about]
  10. Global Citizenship and Humanities Scholarship: Toward a Twenty-First Century Agenda, by Michael Karlberg and Cheshmak Farhoumand-Sims, in International Journal of the Humanities, 2:3 (2006). In this age of global interdependence, the critique of anachronistic social constructs is necessary but insufficient. Scholars must articulate new approaches to globalization. The international Bahá'í community illustrates a constructive, humane approach. [about]
  11. Global Claims, Global Aims: An Analysis of Shoghi Effendi's The World Order of Bahá'u'lláh, by Zaid Lundberg, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). What is Shoghi Effendi’s discourse on 'globalization' and 'globality', and what are the global claims and aims in World Order? [about]
  12. Globalization and Religion, by David Skinner, in International Business & Economics Research Journal, 2:5 (2003). An empirical examination of globalization's religious dimension. Publicly available databases show that much of globalization, or lack of it, can be predicted from data on the religions practiced in a nation. Includes passing mentions of Baha'is. [about]
  13. Globalization and the Hidden Words, by Todd Lawson, in Bahá'í and Globalisation, ed. Margit Warburg (2005). A philological analysis of Baha’u’llah’s Hidden Words, elucidating the development of the global orientation of the Babi-Baha’i religion in the cosmopolitan atmosphere of Baghdad. [about]
  14. Globalization and the Environment, by Arthur Lyon Dahl (1998). Some responses to possible problems associated with globalization. [about]
  15. Globalization of the Bahá'í Community: 1892-1921, The, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). On the connection between Abdu’l-Baha’s thinking and his practical directives in the global expansion of the Baha’i religion, considered in light of Jan Aart Scholte's globalization categories: normative, psychological, economic, and institutional. [about]
  16. Messianic Roots of Babi-Bahá'í Globalism, The, by Stephen Lambden, in Bahá'í and Globalisation (2005). Contrast of the continuity between the globalism of the Bab’s Qayyum al-asma’ and Baha’u’llah’s globalism, verses breaks between the two, e.g. the abandoning of jihad as a means of promoting a globalisation process. [about]
  17. Millennium Forum, by Universal House of Justice (2000). [about]
  18. Perspectives on the Global Economy at the Dawn of the 21st Century: An Irish Bahá'í View, by Eamonn Moane, in Solas, 1 (2001). The state and issues of the global economy, including Ireland, at the start of the 21st century. Though not intended to be a general Bahá’í critique of the world economy, the paper concludes with a Bahá’í contribution to the issues raised. [about]
  19. Toward a New Paradigm of Management, by George Starcher (1991). The fundamental changes taking place in management and organization in reaction to globalization and changing technology, and the new knowledge and information based economy. [about]
  20. Will Globalization Lead to a World Commonwealth?, by Sohrab Abizadeh, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 15:1-4 (2005). [about]
 
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