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from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1863 probably near end Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Súriy-Mulúk (Súrih of Kings). [BKG245; GPB171–2; RB2:301-336]
  • This is described by Shoghi Effendi as ‘the most momentous Tablet revealed by Bahá'u'lláh', in which He, ‘for the first time, directs His words collectively to the entire company of the monarchs of East and West'. [GPB171]
  • See GPB172–5 and RB2:301–25 for a description of the content of the Tablet.
  • In The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p41 Shoghi Effendi dates this tablet as "1863". Given the intense activity of that year an assumption was made that it was revealed near the end of the year in either Constantinople or Adrianople.

Chronological list of significant events related to Bahá'u'lláh's historic pronouncement in the Súriy-i-Múlúk
     Fall of the French Monarchy (1870)
     Virtual Extinction of the Pope's Temporal Sovereignty (1870)
     Assassination of Sultán 'Abdu'l-'Azíz (1876)
     Assassination of Násiri'd-Dín Sháh (1896)
     Overthrow of Sultán 'Abdu'l-Hamíd II (1909)
     Fall of the Portuguese Monarchy (1910)
     Fall of the Chinese Monarchy (1916)
     Fall of the Russian Monarchy (1917)
     Fall of the German Monarchy (1918)
     Fall of the Austrian Monarchy (1918)
     Fall of the Hungarian Monarchy (1918)
     Fall of the Turkish Monarchy (1922)
     Collapse of the Caliphate (1924)
     Fall of the Qájár Dynasty (1925)
     Fall of the Spanish Monarchy (1931)
     Fall of the Albanian Monarchy (1938)
     Fall of the Serbian Monarchy (1941)
     Fall of the Italian Monarchy (1946)
     Fall of the Bulgarian Monarchy (1946)
     Fall of the Rumanian Monarchy (1947) [The Bahá'í Faith 1844-1953 :Information Statistical & Comparative p41-42]
Adrianople; Constantinople Suriy-Muluk; Tablets to kings and rulers; Timelines; History (general); Summons of the Lord of Hosts (book); Writings of Bahaullah; - Basic timeline
1929 Apr The New History Society is founded in New York by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s former secretary and interpreter Ahmad Sohrab. [BRRSM124, LDG2p134]
  • It comes into conflict with the local Bahá’í Assembly, which sees the organization as a threat to the unity of the Bahá’í Faith. [BBRSM124]
New York New History Society; Ahmad Sohrab
1930 39 May With respect to the New History Society and Ahmad Sohrab, Shoghi Effendi writes to the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States and Canada to make a definitive statement regarding that organization and the Cause.
  • "To accept the Cause without the administration is like accepting the teachings without acknowledging the divine station ot Baha'u'lkih, To be a Baha'I is to accept the Cause in its entirety. To take exception to one basic principle is to dcny the authority and sovereignty of Baha'u'lIah, and therefore is to deny the Cause. The administration is the social order of Bahi'u'llah. Without it all the principles of the Cause will remain abortive. To take exception to this, therefore, is to take exception to the fabric t,hat Baha'u'lhih has prescribed, it is to disobey His law."
  • The message goes on to say that "unfailing kindness and goodwill" should be paid to the individuals and that the doors to Bahá'í fellowship should always remain open. [Bahá'í News p333]
Haifa New History Society; Ahmad Sohrab; Covenant-breaker
1930 Aug The National Spiritual Assembly published a statement in the Bahá'í News entitled The Case of Ahmad Sohrab and the New History Society. Summarized, the article stated that the “New History Society was begun in New York early in 1929 by Sohrab and "one of its avowed purposes being to spread the Bahá'í teachings. Neither the local nor the National Assembly was consulted in the matter, and the meetings and activities of the New History Society have been maintained apart from the principles of consultation which today, under the Will and Testament of 'Abdu’l-Bahá, form the basis of Bahá'í unity and the protection of the Cause."

"Both the local and National Assembly on several occasions attempted, through oral and written communications, to bring about full and frank consultation with the leaders of the New History Society, but without success.

"Under these conditions it becomes the obvious responsibility of the National Spiritual Assembly to inform the friends that activities conducted by Ahmad Sohrab through the New History Society are to be considered as entirely independent of the Cause, as outside the jurisdiction of the local and National Assembly, and hence in no wise entitled to the cooperation of Bahá'ís."

This statement also quoted from a letter written on behalf of the Guardian by his Secretary to the National Spiritual Assembly on May 30, 1930: "To accept the Cause without the administration is like accepting the teachings without acknowledging the divine station of Bahá’u’lláh. To be a Bahá'í is to accept the Cause in its entirety...." "The administration is the social order of Bahá'u'lláh. Without it all the principles of the Cause will remain abortive. To take exception to this, therefore, is to take exception to the fabric that Bahá'u'lláh has prescribed, it is to disobey His law." [Ahmad Sohrab and the New History Society]

New York; NY Covenant-Breakers; Ahmad Sohrab; Mrs Chandler; New History Society
1930 Nov The National Assembly published a detailed supplementary statement in the Bahá’í News, quoting passages from the Aqdas, from the Master's Will and Testament, and from the Guardian's letters published in Bahá’í Administration, followed by a reprint of the exchange of correspondence and cables with Mrs. Chanler, and with the Guardian, including the Guardian's cable to New York believers: "True unity can only be preserved by maintenance paramount position National Spiritual Assembly," and his cable approving the statement published in August, 1930, Bahá'í News. Further, in a letter from Haifa to the Yonkers Assembly, “The Guardian pointed out the difference between the freedom defined by Bahá'u'lláh ("To have liberty is to observe My commandments") and that advocated by Sohrab ("The other kind of freedom which is in defiance of law He (Bahá'u'lláh) considers to be animal, and far from being of any good to man"). [Ahmad Sohrab and the New History Society] New York; NY Covenant-Breakers; Ahmad Sohrab; Mrs Chanler; New History Society
1937 Dec The writing of Episodes in the History of the Covenant by Shoghi Effendi originally written as "Waqáy-i-Tárikhiyyih dar 'Ahd wa Mitháq-i-Iláhi" for the friends in Iran. In 1997 it was translated by Khazeh Fananapazir and edited by Mehdi Wolf. [Episodes in the History of the Covenant BWC; Iran; Episodes in the History of the Covenant
1941 Nov The National Spiritual Assembly of the United States and Canada distributed a mimeographed statement concerning the New History Society entitled The Basis of the Bahá’í Community, which explained the purpose and outcome of the lawsuit entered against the founders of the New History Society to prevent their misuse of the name "Bahá’í” on which the National Spiritual Assembly had obtained a trade mark patent. The court took the position that it was not authorized to decide religious questions. [The Basis of the Bahá'í Community: A Statement Concerning the New History Society] Covenant-Breakers; New History Society; Ahmad Sohrab title; title
1952 1 Jun In a letter written on behalf of the Guardian by the Assistant Secretary, the National Spiritual Assembly was informed that Ahmad Sohrab had cabled the Israeli Minister of Religion to influence the court case brought by the Covenant-breakers, against the Guardian, and which resulted in complete vindication of the Guardian's control of the Bahá'í Shrines and properties. Sohrab's cable identified the Caravan with the Covenant-breakers and stated that the organization was not under the authority of Shoghi Effendi. In a letter dated May 25, 1941, the Guardian wrote through his Secretary that Sohrab "is no doubt the most subtle, resourceful and indefatigable enemy the Faith has had in America." Covenant-Breakers; New History Society; Ahmad Sohrab; Mrs Chandler
1958 20 Apr Mírzá Ahmad (Esphahani) Sohrab, the Covenant-breaker who rebelled against Shoghi Effendi, dies. [MC90]
  • For the story of his defection from the Faith see CB343–7.
  • He is burried in the Saint Paul Episcopal Church Cemetery, Glen Cove, Nassau County, New York.
Glen Cove; Nassau County; New York Mirza Ahmad Sohrab; Covenant-breaker; New History Society
1983 5 – 7 Aug The first Los Angeles Bahá’í History Conference is held at the University of California at Los Angeles. [BW19:369–70] Los Angeles Los Angeles Baha’i History Conference; Conference
1990 22 May The nations of Northern Yemen and Marxist Southern Yemen unite to become the Republic of Yemen with Ali Abdullah Saleh, a former a conservative military leader, as President. Saleh had served as President of North Yemen for 12 years until then.

Ali Salim al-Beidh, a Soviet-trained southern army commander, was chosen as Vice President. Mr. Bidh, had. ruled Southern Yemen when it was a Marxist state. A unification of the two countries' political and economic systems was to take place over 30 months. In that time, a unified parliament was formed and a unity constitution was agreed upon. Tensions between North and South continued with sporadic fighting.

Yemen; Recent history Yemen
1993 Vice President Ali Salim Al-Beidh quits Saleh’s government and returns to Aden in southern Yemen and said he would not return to the government until his grievances were addressed. These included northern violence against his Yemeni Socialist Party, as well as the economic marginalization of the south. Negotiations to end the political deadlock dragged on into 1994. The government of Prime Minister Haydar Abu Bakr Al-Attas, the former PDRY Prime Minister, became ineffective due to political infighting. yemen Recent History Yemen
1994 May An accord between northern and southern leaders was signed in Amman but this could not stop the civil war. During these tensions, both the northern and southern armies–which had never integrated–gathered on their respective frontiers Yemen Recent History Yemen
1994 27 Apr Civil war (The War of Secession of 1994, May to early July) erupts in Yemen and ends in a victory for Saleh within three months. A major tank battle erupted in Amran, near San'a. Both sides accused the other of starting it.

On 4 May, the southern air force bombed San'a and other areas in the north; the northern air force responded by bombing Aden.

President Saleh declared a 30-day state of emergency, and foreign nationals began evacuating the country.

Vice President al-Beidh was officially dismissed.

South Yemen fired Scud missiles into San'a, killing dozens of civilians.

Prime Minister Haidar Abu Bakr al-Attas was dismissed on May 10 after appealing for outside forces to help end the war.

Southern leaders seceded and declared the Democratic Republic of Yemen (DRY) on 21 May 1994. No international government recognized the DRY.

In mid-May, northern forces began a push toward Aden. The key city of Ataq, which allowed access to the country's oil fields, was seized on May 24.

The United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 924 calling for an end to the fighting and a cease-fire. A cease-fire was called on 6 June, but lasted only six hours; concurrent talks to end the fighting in Cairo collapsed as well.

The north entered Aden on 4 July. Supporters of Ali Nasir Muhammad greatly assisted military operations against the secessionists and Aden was captured on 7 July 1994. Most resistance quickly collapsed and top southern military and political leaders fled into exile.

Almost all of the actual fighting in the 1994 civil war occurred in the southern part of the country, despite air and missile attacks against cities and major installations in the north. Southerners sought support from neighbouring states and may have received military assistance from Saudi Arabia and Oman, which felt threatened by a united Yemen. The United States repeatedly called for a cease-fire and a return to the negotiating table. Various attempts, including by a UN special envoy and Russia, were unsuccessful to effect a cease-fire.

President Saleh now had control over all of Yemen. A general amnesty was declared, except for 16 southern figures accused of misappropriation of official funds.

YSP (Yemen Socialist Party) leaders within Yemen reorganized following the civil war and elected a new politburo in July 1994. However, much of its influence had been destroyed in the war.

Yemen Recent History Yemen
1994 1 Oct President Ali Abdallah Saleh was elected by Parliament on 1 October 1994 to a 5-year term. However, he remained in office until 2012. Yemen Recent History Yemen
1997 27 Aor In the second parliamentary election in Yemen the GPC won a majority of the seats, Iṣlāḥ finished second, and the YSP (Yemen Socialist Party) virtually committed political suicide by boycotting the elections. Given its sizable majority, the GPC chose to rule alone, thereby making Iṣlāḥ the major opposition party in parliament. In late 1994 the plural executive had been abolished and President Ṣāliḥ reelected to a five-year term by parliament. Yemen Recent History Yemen
1999 Sep September 1999 President Ṣāliḥ was again returned to office, this time in the country’s first direct presidential elections and for a term lengthened to seven years. He had run virtually unopposed, as the YSP candidate was unable to secure the minimum number of votes necessary in the GPC-dominated parliament to stand in the election. Yemen Recent History Yemen
2003 Autumn The publication of History of Bahá'ísm in Iran by Abdullah Shahbazi, the then head of the Political Studies and Research Institute, part of the Institute for Iranian Contemporary Historical Studies. In his book he advanced the theory of the alliance between Bahá'ísm and Zionism. [Iran Press Watch1407] Iran History of Baha'ism in Iran; Abdullah Shahbazi
2011 Hundreds killed in crackdown on mass protests calling for fall of President Saleh, an end to corruption and repression and accountability for human rights violations. President Saleh forced to resign and sign power-transfer deal. Yemen Recent History Yemen
2012 Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi elected as president initiating a two-year transitional period. However, government forces continue to commit human rights violations, including unlawful killings and enforced disappearances, against supporters of secession in south and a conflict with the Huthi armed group in north is renewed. Yemen Recent History Yemen
2014 Sep In Yemen, Houthis call for mass protests after government slashes fuel subsidies. The group advances south and seizes Yemen’s capital, Sana’a overthrowing President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi's internationally-recognised government. By February 2015 the group dissolves parliament and announces plans for a transitional government. Sana'a; Yemen Recent History Yemen
2015 Clashes between pro and anti Huthis escalate. After President Hadi appeals to Gulf and Arab states to intervene militarily, Saudi Arabian-led military coalition launches air strikes against the Huthi armed group positions in Sana’a and Sa’da. President Hadi flees to Saudi Arabia. Over the next six months the conflict spreads across Yemen. Yemen Recent History Yemen
2015 Mar Southerners took to arms and formed resistance to further progress their cause for independence by fighting in order to defend their territory from northern control and a coup of the legitimate government.

A Saudi-led coalition, backed by the United States, began a campaign against Houthi forces allied with ousted President Ali Abdullah Saleh in support of Hadi's government. The Houthis were dislodged from most of the south, but remained in control of Sanaa and much of the north.

In the southern part of the country, the United Arab Emirates, which is part of the Saudi-led coalition, set up its own security forces, running virtually a state-within-a-state and fuelling the south's independence movement.

Yemen Recent history Yemen
2016 The conflict continues to rage throughout the year. UN-sponsored peace talks begin in Kuwait in April but breakdown in early August. On 8 October, a Saudi Arabia-led coalition killed more than 100 people attending a funeral gathering in Sana’a and injured more than 500 others – one of the largest death tolls in any single incident since the start of the coalition’s bombing campaign. Yemen; Reent History Yemen

from the main catalogue

  1. 100 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Europe, by Graham Hassall and Seena Fazel, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Overview of the first 100 years of the Bahá'í Faith in Europe, including growth and the distinctive aspects of this community, external affairs, the role of women, and Bahá'í studies. [about]
  2. 1970-1995: Newspaper articles archive (1970). Collection of newspaper articles from 1970-1995. [about]
  3. 20,000 Martyrs, Source of Statements about, by Universal House of Justice (1984). Two letters from the Research Department: one from 1984 identifies the source of the statement that 20,000 Bábís were martyred, and one from 2005 says that this source has not actually been found. [about]
  4. 275 Years of the Creative and Performing Arts: 1740-2015: Pioneering Over Four Epochs, Section VIII Poetry, by Ron Price, in Pioneering Over Four Epochs: An Autobiographical Study and a Study in Autobiography (2006). Music, theatre, dance, dramaturgy, the graphic arts, cartooning, the performing arts, film, publishing, galleries, museums, and the visual arts have played an important part in the life of humankind--and in my poetry. [about]
  5. 75 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Australasia (1996). Papers from the proceedings from the 1995 National Bahá'í Studies Conference, Australia. [about]
  6. 'Abdu'l Bahá's Tablet of the Two Calls: Civilizing Barbarity, by Manooher Mofidi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  7. `Abdu'l-Baha in Abu-Sinan: September 1914–May 1915, by Ahang Rabbani, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 13 (2005). The story of Abdu'l-Baha's relocating the Haifa/Akka Baha'i community of some 140 people to a nearby Druze village to keep them safe during World War I. [about]
  8. Abdu'l-Baha in Britain: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (2011). Short overview of Abdu'l-Baha's travels to Britain. [about]
  9. 'Abdu'l-Baha Writes to Kansas City, by Duane L. Herrmann (2002). Early history of the Baha'i Faith in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, from 1896 to 1919 and beyond. Includes three new provisional translations. [about]
  10. Account of How I Became a Bahá'í and My Stays in Paris in 1901 and 1937, An: Written at the Request of Mrs. Laura Dreyfus-Barney, by Agnes Baldwin Alexander (1958). [about]
  11. Account of the Main Events in Persia during October 1912 to October 1913, An, by G. D. Turner (1913). Overview of developments in Iran in 1913, with passing references to Abdu'l-Baha and E.G. Browne. [about]
  12. Afnán Family, The: Some Biographical Notes, by Ahang Rabbani (2007). Genealogy of the Báb and biographies of his descendants; meaning of afnan. [about]
  13. Ahmad Sohrab and the New History Society, by Paul E. Haney and Horace Holley (1958). Overview of the defection of Ahmad Sohrab and the formation of the "New History Society" and the "Caravan of East and West." [about]
  14. American Bahá'í Community in the Nineties, The, by Robert Stockman, in America's Alternative Religions, Timothy Miller, ed. (1995). Overview of the contemporary Baha'i community, its activities, and its concerns. [about]
  15. Aspects of the History of the Bahá'í Faith in Switzerland, Some, by John Paul Vader (2009). Switzerland was among the first countries opened to the Bahá’i religion. This paper describes the connections between the Bahá’i Faith and Switzerland and a selection of episodes in the early history of the development of the community there. [about]
  16. Australia: History of the Bahá'í Faith, by Graham Hassall (1998). Short history of the Baha'i community of Australia. [about]
  17. Australian Women and Religious Change: Margaret Dixson and the First Melbourne Baha'is, by Graham Hassall, in Proceedings of the Association for Bahá'í Studies (1988). [about]
  18. Báb in Shiraz, The: An Account by Mírzá Habíbu'lláh Afnán, in Witnesses to Babi and Bahá'í History, vol. 16 (2008). Recollections of the early years of the Bab and his family, and the times following his declaration; written by a relative. [about]
  19. Bábís of Nayriz, The: History and Documents, in Witnesses to Babi and Bahá'í History, vol. 2 (2006). Extensive collection of historical documents: autobiographies, narratives, genealogies and chronologies, the transition from the Babi to the Baha'i community, provisional translations, and a list of Babi martyrs. [about]
  20. Bahá'í country notes: China, by Graham Hassall (1997). History of the Baha'i community in China. [about]
  21. Bahá'í country notes: Egypt, by Graham Hassall (1997). History of Baha'is in Egypt from 1860s to 1961 referencing early merchant settlements, Abdu'l-Baha's visits, the Alexandria, Cairo, Port Said and national communities plus persecutions, court decisions, and the Presidential anti-Baha'i decree 263 of 1960. [about]
  22. Bahá'í country notes: Africa, by Graham Hassall (1999). [about]
  23. Bahá'í Faith in the Asia Pacific: Issues and Prospects, by Graham Hassall, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 6 (1996). [about]
  24. Bahá'í Centenary, The: 100 years of the Bahá'í Faith in Britain, A Brief History: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1998). Short history of the Baha'is of the United Kingdom. [about]
  25. Bahá'í Communities by Country: Research Notes, by Graham Hassall (2000). Brief notes on the history of Baha'i activities and the dates of NSA formation in Africa, China, Australia, and elsewhere. [about]
  26. Bahá'í Communities in the Asia-Pacific: Performing Common Theology and Cultural Diversity on a 'Spiritual Axis', by Graham Hassall and William Barnes (1998). [about]
  27. Bahá'í Community of Randwick: A Survey of 75 Years, by Graham Hassall, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, 1:1 (1999). History of the Baha'i community of Randwick, Australia. [about]
  28. Baha'i country notes: Australia, by Graham Hassall (1997). [about]
  29. Bahá'í Faith: Origin, Missionary Work, and the Entrance into Vietnam, by Mai Thanh Hai, in Religious Studies Review, 4:2 (2008). An outsider's short history of the Faith in Vietnam since 1954 and current activities in the country. [about]
  30. Bahá'í Faith 1957-1988, The: A Survey of Contemporary Developments, by Peter Smith and Moojan Momen, in Religion, 19 (1989). A general account of developments in the Bahá'í Faith during these three decades. [about]
  31. Bahá'í Faith in Africa, The: Establishing a New Religious Movement, 1952-1962, by Antony Lee (2011). African presence in early Babi and Baha'i history; Baha'i response to crises in Middle East and West Africa; histories of British Camaroons, Calabar. Studies of Religion in Africa series, vol. 39. [about]
  32. Baha'i Faith in America, by William Garlington: Review, by Peter Terry (2017). [about]
  33. Bahá'í Faith in Australia: 75 Years Remembered, by Graham Hassall, in Herald of the South (1995). [about]
  34. Bahá'í Faith in Australia 1947-1963, by Graham Hassall, in 75 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Australasia (1996). [about]
  35. Bahá'í Faith in England and Germany, 1900-1913, by Robert Stockman, in World Order (1996). Historical overview of the early years of the Faith in the British Isles and Germany. [about]
  36. Bahá'í Faith in Hong Kong, by Graham Hassall (1998). Extensive and detailed overview of the history of the Baha'i community in Hong Kong. [about]
  37. Bahá'í Faith in Tasmania 1923-1963, by Graham Hassall, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). Early history of the Baha'i community of Tasmania. [about]
  38. Baha'i Faith, The: The Emerging Global Religion, by William S. Hatcher and Douglas Martin (1985). Overview of Baha'i history and teachings, designed as an introductory textbook. Available as an ebook in English or a PDF in Persian. [about]
  39. Baha'i Faith, The: 50 Years in Singapore (2000). History of Baha'i activity and teaching in Singapore, from May 26 1950, when the first Baha’i pioneer, Dr. K.M. Fozdar, arrived in Singapore, until the year 2000. [about]
  40. Bahá'í History, by Firuz Kazemzadeh. Significance of history to the study of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  41. Bahá'í History, by Moojan Momen and Peter Smith (1993). A general survey of the history of the Baha'i Faith, including a brief overview of main events in Babi and Baha'i history. Next, a series of themes that have developed throughout Baha'i history is examined. [about]
  42. Bahá'í History, in Journal of Religious History, 36:4 (2012). A complete issue of this well-known journal was dedicated entirely to Baha'i Studies. So far, only 3 articles from it are online. [about]
  43. Baha'i Religious History: Introduction, by Todd Lawson, in Journal of Religious History, 36:4 (2012). Introduction to a special issue of this journal titled "Baha'i History," summarizing the prophetic record, the divine hierarchy of history, and the primacy of science and education. [about]
  44. Bahá'ís of the United States, The, by Robert Stockman, in New Religions (1995). [about]
  45. Bahai Religious Faith and Tradition in Bangladesh, by Muhammad Jahangir Alam, in Bangladesh e-Journal of Sociology, 8:1 (2011). History of the Faith in eastern Bengal and a sketch of current distribution, organization, and activities of Baha'is in Bangladesh. [about]
  46. Basis of the Bahá'í Community, The: A Statement Concerning the New History Society, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States (1941). A statement on Ahmad Sohrab's activities and its trademark infringement case. [about]
  47. Black Roses in Canada's Mosaic: Four Decades of Black History, by Will C. van den Hoonaard and Lynn Echevarria-Howe (1994). Survey of African-Americans in Canada, their activities in the Baha'i community, and statistical information. [about]
  48. Broad Contours of the Canadian Baha'i Community, by Will C. van den Hoonaard and Deborah K. van den Hoonaard (1994). Historical and sociological overview of the Canadian Baha'i community. [about]
  49. Cause of the Rise and Fall of Civilizations, The, by Ruhaniyyih Ruth Moffett (1954). A chart correlating the growth of maturity of humanity and the evolution of religions with major events in history. [about]
  50. Century of Light, by Universal House of Justice (2001). Survey of the history and dramatic changes of the 20th Century and the Bahá'í Faith's emergence from obscurity, "demonstrating on a global scale the unifying power with which its Divine origin has endowed it." [about]
  51. Chart of the Eras and Epochs of Bahá'í History, by Arjen Bolhuis (2000). Diagram of the periods of Bahá'í history. Available in English and Russian. [about]
  52. Chronological study: Tablets to the Rulers, by Melissa Tansik (1998). Timeline of the rise of nation states, 1844-1871, and the history and fate of the rulers to whom Baha'u'llah wrote in the 1860s. [about]
  53. Circumpolar Regions (Arctic): History of the Baha'i Faith, by Will C. van den Hoonaard (1994). [about]
  54. Colonialism, Nationalism and Jewish Immigration to Palestine: Abdu'l-Baha's Viewpoints Regarding the Middle East , by Kamran Ekbal (2014). Abdu'l-Baha was opposed to the cultural and political colonialism of foreign powers and their militaries. In spite of the Baha'i principle of abstaining from politics, exceptions can be made in the face of tyranny and injustice. [about]
  55. Conspiracies and Forgeries: The Attack upon the Bahá'í Community in Iran, by Moojan Momen, in Persian Heritage, 9:35 (2004). [about]
  56. Conversion of Religious Minorities to the Bahá'í Faith in Iran: Some Preliminary Observations, by Susan Maneck, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:3 (1990). Conversion patterns of Zoroastrians and Jews in the period 1877-1921. [about]
  57. Crossroads of Civilization: 3000 Years of Persian History, by Clive Irving (1979). Passing mentions of Babi history and the word "Bábí" being used as a label to tarnish political dissidents. [about]
  58. Crowning Anguish: Memoirs of a Persian Princess from the Harem to Modernity 1884-1914, by Taj al-Saltana (1993). Passing references to the Babis in Amanat's introduction to, and in the autobiography of, Nasir al-Din's daughter. [about]
  59. Dawn-Breakers: Nabil's Narrative of the Early Days of the Bahá'í Revelation, by Nabil-i-A'zam (1932). The extensive and preeminent history of Babism and the early Baha'i Faith, by Nabil-i-A'zam [aka Mullá Muḥammad-i-Zarandí, aka Nabíl-i-Zarandí]. [about]
  60. Dawn-Breakers: Nabíl's Narrative of the Early Days of The Bahá'í Revelation: Study Guide, by National Teaching Committee (1932). [about]
  61. Dear Co-worker: Messages from Shoghi Effendi to the Benelux countries, by Shoghi Effendi (2009). Messages from Shoghi Effendi to the Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg). [about]
  62. Debunking the Myths: Conspiracy Theories on the Genesis and Mission of the Bahá'í Faith, by Adib Ma'sumian (2009). Response to Iranian conspiracy theories portraying the Baha'i Faith as a subversive political group, Zionist spies, affiliates of the secret police, British agents, etc. Available in English and Persian. Includes interview with author. [about]
  63. Demystifying Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of the Holy Mariner: History, Translations, Interpretations and Analysis, by Hui Bau (2016). Lengthy compilation, with background information on the Tablet, and commentary from Bau, Adib Taherzadeh, Michael Sours, Jamsheed Samandari, and Aziz Mboya. [about]
  64. Descripción de La Comunidad Internacional Bahá'í, by Bahá'í International Community. Descripción de La Comunidad Internacional Bahá'í [about]
  65. Divide and Rule: The Creation of the Alawi State after World War I, by Necati Alkan, in Fikrun wa Fann ("Art and Thought") (2013). Summary of 20th-century history of the Nusayri/Alawi Shi'i movement in Syria and Turkey. (No mention of Baha'is.) [about]
  66. First newspaper story of the events of the Bábí Faith (2013). Six versions of the first public mentions in English of the Bábís, from November 1845. [about]
  67. Half the Household Was African: Recovering the Histories of Two African Slaves in Iran, by Anthony Lee, in UCLA Historical Journal, 26:1 (2015). Biographies of two enslaved Africans in Iran, Haji Mubarak and Fezzeh Khanum, the servants of The Bab. A history of slavery in Iran can be written, not only at the level of statistics, laws, and politics, but also at the level of individual lives. [about]
  68. Historia de su Cooperacion con las Naciones Unidas, by Bahá'í International Community. [about]
  69. Historical Account of Two Indian Babis: Sa'en Hindi and Sayyid Basir Hindi, by Sepehr Manuchehri (2001). Includes translated excerpts from a number of Persian sources on these two individuals. [about]
  70. Historical Development of Genoa Square in Acre Israel from the Seventh Century to the Present Day, The, by Amy Suzanne Hollander (1995). A study of the structure, development, space, and historic preservation of a portion of Akka, including discussion of its place in Baha'i history. [about]
  71. History of the Bahá'í Faith in Boston, by The Pluralism Project (2010). Two short documents by Harvard University's religious pluralism project: "Timeline of the Bahá’í Faith in Greater Boston" and "The Bahá’í Faith in Greater Boston." [about]
  72. History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, by John William Draper (1864). A selection of excerpts from the book. Contains no mention of the Baha'i Faith, but is of interest partly because Abdu'l-Baha referred to this book in Secret of Divine Civilization. [about]
  73. House of Abdu'llah Pasha, The, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Short history and restoration of a house associated with "some of the most dramatic and historically significant events of the Heroic Age of the Bahá'í Faith." [about]
  74. Infallibility and Historical Knowledge of the Guardian, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). While the Guardian's infallibility applies to interpretation of revelation, it does not include historical and scientific knowledge. [about]
  75. Interracial "Bahá'í Movement" and the Black Intelligentsia, The: The Case of W. E. B. Du Bois, by Christopher Buck, in Journal of Religious History, 36:4 (2012). Du Bois’s encounters with the Baha’i religion from 1910 to 1953, his connection to the New York Baha’i community, and discussion of segregated Baha’i meetings in Tennessee in 1937. [about]
  76. Iran: Province of Káshán and Central Provinces (Sultánábád, Mahallát, and Gulpáygán), by Moojan Momen (1994). [about]
  77. Jamal Effendi and Sayyid Mustafa Rumi in Celebes: The Context of Early Bahá'í Missionary Activity in Indonesia, by Jelle de Vries, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 14 (2007). [about]
  78. Jamál Effendi and the early history of the Bahá'í Faith in South Asia, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). Includes maps on Jamal Effendi's journeys in India, and journeys in Southeast Asia. [about]
  79. Judeo-Persian Communities of Iran in the Qajar Period: Conversion to the Bahá'í Faith, by Mehrdad Amanat, in Encyclopaedia Iranica (2009). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  80. Macau Bahá'í Community in the Early Years, by Barbara R. Sims (1991). Brief overview of the history of Macau, and a detailed account of Baha'i involvement 1953-1975, and stories of early believers. [about]
  81. Map of Stages in Baha'u'llah's Successive Exiles from Tihran to Akka, by Muhammad Labib (1968). Map of Stages in Baha'u'llah's Successive Exiles from Tihran to Akka, compiled and designed by Muhammad Labib in 1968, includes an extensive list of which tablets Baha'u'llah revealed and where. [about]
  82. Map of the Travels of Baha'u'llah (1991). The progressive exiles of Baha'u'llah through the Middle East. [about]
  83. Meaning of Baha'i History, The, by Moshe Sharon (1999). [about]
  84. Men and the Baha'i Faith: The role of indigenous men in the early Baha'i community in the British Isles, by Lil Osborn (2016). Includes slide-show included when presenting the paper at the Baha'i Studies Seminar, Kellogg College, Oxford (July 2016). [about]
  85. Mid-East History during the Islamic Period: Chronology and Commentary, by Brian A. Miller (2000). Brief overview of Islamic history. [about]
  86. Moths Turned Eagles: The Spiritual Conquests of Sabri and Raissa Elias, by Gamal Hassan (2008). Introduction of the Baha'i Faith to Ethiopia and Djibouti, and the activities of Gila Bahta. [about]
  87. Nabil's Narrative: What History has Forgotten, by Soheila Vahdati (2008). An outsider's view of how Iranian media and society have glossed over or intentionally obscured Iran's treatment of 19th-century dissidents. [about]
  88. Netherlands: History of the Baha'i Faith, by Will C. van den Hoonaard (1993). [about]
  89. Notes on the Babi and Bahá'í Religions in Russia and its territories, by Graham Hassall, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:3 (1993). Overview of the history of Babi and Baha'i communities in Russia and Russian territories. [about]
  90. Notes on the Twentieth Century, by Douglas Martin (2001). Multiple transcriptions of talks given in Atlanta, New York, and Massachusetts in September and October, 2001, largely based on the document Century of Light. [about]
  91. Origins of the Bahá'í Faith in the Pacific Islands: The Case of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands, by Graham Hassall, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 16:1-4 (2006). [about]
  92. Our Precious Heritage: The Coming of the Faith to Wales, by C. Edmund Card (n.d.). History of Baha'i activities in Wales 1942-1973, focusing especially the active sixteen-year period 1946-1962. [about]
  93. Outpost of a World Religion: The Bahá'í Faith in Australia 1920-1947, by Graham Hassall, in Journal of Religious History, 16:3 (1991). An updated version of a paper published in two places. [about]
  94. Pacific Bahá'í Communities 1950-1964, by Graham Hassall, in Pacific History: Papers from the 8th Pacific History Association Conference, Donald H. Rubinstein, ed. (1992). Detailed overview of the history of Baha'is in Pacific island states. [about]
  95. Part of the Baha'i History of the Family of Charles and Maria Ioas, by Viola Tuttle and Margarite Ioas Ullrich (1978). Biographies of Charles and Maria: from his birth in 1859, their introduction to the Faith in 1898, experiences with 'Abdu'l-Bahá in 1912, and four Tablets from 'Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
  96. Persian Bahá'ís in Australia, by Graham Hassall, in Religion and Ethnic Identity, An Australian Study, Abe Ata, ed. (1989). Overview of the history and modern activities (ca. 1989) of the Persian Baha'i community in Australia. [about]
  97. Picture Gallery of Early British Bahá'ís (1998). Published in honor of the UK Baha'i Centenary, 1998/99. [about]
  98. Pivot of the Universe: Nasir al-Din Shah Qajar and the Iranian Monarchy 1831-1896, by Abbas Amanat: Review, by Sholeh A. Quinn, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). [about]
  99. Preliminary History of the Bahá'í Community of Samarkand, Uzbekistan, by Duane L. Herrmann and Hasan T. Shodiev, in Bahá'í Vizier (2004). Since repression of religion ended in the USSR, Baha'is in former Soviet territories resumed practice of their faith and become curious about their history, most of which had been destroyed. This article is an early step at rediscovering this history. [about]
  100. Radio Bahá'í del Lago Titicaca, 20 años de historia, by Rene Quiñonez, in La Pluma del Conocimiento, 2 (2002). Un breve relato sobre los logros de un proyecto de desarrollo socio económico al servicio de los pobladores del altiplano peruano boliviano. [about]
  101. Radio Baha'i Ecuador, by Kurt Hein: Review, by Des O'Shea, in CADE: Journal of Distance Education, 4:1 (1989). [about]
  102. Rationalisation and re-enchantment in Malaysia: Temiar religion 1964-1995, by Geoffrey Benjamin (1996). Extensive discussion of the Baha’i Faith among the Temiars of Malaysia. Link to paper (offsite). [about]
  103. Ruptured Spaces and Effective Histories: The Unveiling of the Babi Poetess Qurrat al-'Ayn-Tahirih in the Gardens of Badasht, by Negar Mottahedeh, in Occasional Papers in Shaykhi, Babi and Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1998). Implications of Tahirih's revolutionary act at Badasht in terms of a decisive break with Islamic history; also Shaykh Abu Turab's recollections of the event and his literary role in Nabil's Dawn-Breakers. [about]
  104. Sacred Mythology and the Bahá'í Faith, by William P. Collins, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:4 (1990). [about]
  105. Servants in the Households of Baha'u'llah and the Bab, by Universal House of Justice (2000). Whether or not the servants of the Bab and Baha'u'llah were slaves, and a list of relevant sources for further research. [about]
  106. Servants of the Glory: A Chronicle of Forty Years of Pioneering, by Adrienne Morgan and Dempsey Morgan (2017). Memoirs of a black couple from the United States who lived and spread the Bahá’í Faith in across parts of east Asia and Africa in the 1950s-1980s. Text by Dempsey Morgan, poems by Adrienne Morgan. Link to document offsite. [about]
  107. Seventy Five Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Victoria, Australia, by Graham Hassall (1998). History of the Baha'i community of Victoria, Australia. [about]
  108. Shoghi Effendi's View of Providential History in Light of the Judaeo-Christian Tradition, by Jack McLean, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 13 (2005). The Guardian's letters reveal six feature of his historicity: palingenesis and transitional history; providential synchronization; teleological history; organically whole history; periodisation of ages and epochs; history as community identity-creation. [about]
  109. Situation of the Bahá'ís in Egypt, by Bahá'í International Community (2007). Oral Statement of the Bahá’í International Community to the Human Rights Council (6th Session of the Human Rights Council), Geneva, Switzerland. [about]
  110. Stories of Baha'u'llah and Some Notable Believers, by Adib Taherzadeh (2003). Extracts compiled from Adib Taherzadeh’s The Revelation of Bahá’u’lláh, Volumes 1-4. [about]
  111. Story of the Last One Hundred Years of the Baha'i Faith in Seattle, The, by Zabine Van Ness (2007). Compiled for the 2007 centenary of the Seattle and Spokane Bahá’í assemblies, detailing the 100 year history of the Bahá'í Faith in Seattle. [about]
  112. Suggestions for Bahá'í Hermeneutics, by Mark A. Foster (1999). Four essays: "Non-Overlapping Magisteria [science, religion, and Stephen Jay Gould]," "Infallibility: Sinlessness and Prophetic Ecology," "The Case of Some Answered Questions [pedagogy and evolution]," and "The Gospel According to Nabíl." [about]
  113. Tablet to Napoleon III (Lawh-i-Napulyún): Biography of Napoleon, in Encyclopedia Britannica (1999). First Tablet to Napoleon. [about]
  114. Tablet to Pope Pius IX (Lawh-i-Páp): Biography of Pope Pius IX, in Encyclopedia Britannica (1999). [about]
  115. Tablet to Tsar Alexander II (Lawh-i-Malik-i-Rus): Biography of Tsar Alexander, in Encyclopedia Britannica (1999). Short biography of Tsar Alexander ll describing him as a great historical figure without the charisma of a great man. Suggests history should view what he did, such as abolishing serfdom and building railroads, as more important than who he was. [about]
  116. Tafsir and the Meaning of the Qur'an: The Crucifixion in Muslim Thought, by Todd Lawson (2010). Using Qur'án 4:156-7 as an example, classical tafsīr, “scholastic" exegesis, has not always taken account of the way all Muslims understand the Quranic text. Other understandings may be found in poetry, philosophy, mysticism and even historical writing. [about]
  117. Taiwan Bahá'í Chronicle: An Historical Record of the Early Days of the Bahá'í Faith in Taiwan, by Barbara R. Sims (1994). Baha'i activities in Taiwan and personal histories, 1952-1992. Includes earliest pamphlet published in Chinese. [about]
  118. Tehran, Iran, by Moojan Momen, in The Bahá'í Encyclopedia (2009). On the capital city of Iran and birthplace of Bahá’u’lláh, called by Him the "Land of Tá" (Ard-i-Tá), site of numerous important events in Bahá’í history. [about]
  119. Traces That Remain: A Pictorial History of the Early Days of the Bahá'í Faith among the Japanese, by Barbara R. Sims (1989). Extensive history of Baha'i events and personages in Japan, 1914-1983. [about]
  120. Trial of the Bab: Mulla Muhammad Mamaqani's account (1997). Translation of source documents preserved from the 1848 trial. [about]
  121. Trial of the Báb: Shi'ite Orthodoxy Confronts its Mirror Image, by Denis MacEoin, in Studies in Honor of Clifford Edmund Bosworth 2: The Sultan's Turret (2000). Overview of, and documents preserved from, the Bab's 1848 trial for heresy against Islam. [about]
  122. Unassailable Foundation of the Cause of God: Questions about the Universal House of Justice, by Universal House of Justice (1965). Why were steps taken to elect a Universal House of Justice with the foreknowledge that there would be no Guardian? Was the time ripe for such an action? Could not the International Baha'i Council have carried on the work? [about]
  123. Understanding Bahá'í History: Introduction to the study of history, by Moojan Momen (2013). Video and transcript, prepared for the Wilmette Institute, about how to approach and understand the study of history, biases of eyewitnesses, and the subjective construction of facts. [about]
  124. United States National Spiritual Assembly vs. Mirza Ahmad Sohrab (1941). In 1941 the National Spiritual Assembly unsuccessfully sued Covenant Breaker Mirza Ahmad Sohrab for his use of the word "Baha'i." This is the court's conclusions. [about]
  125. United States of America: History of the Bahá'í Faith, by Robert Stockman (1995). History of the Baha'i community of the United States. [about]
  126. Virgin Islands, U.S. and British, by Patricia Paccassi (1995). [about]
  127. Visits of the Hands of the Cause of God to Ireland, by Betsy Omidvaran, in Solas, 3 (2003). An overview of all known visits by the Hands, the highest-ranking officers of the Bahá’í Faith, to Ireland. Review of the many historical sources about this largely-uninvestigated topic. Includes timeline of the visits between 1952 and 1986. [about]
  128. Windows to the Past, by Darius Shahrokh (1992). Deepening talks on 25 topics about Baha'i history and teachings, downloadable in MP3 audio format and PDF transcripts. [about]
  129. Witness to Shaykh Tabarsi: The Narrative of Haji Nasir Qazvini, in Witnesses to Babi and Bahá'í History, vol. 8 (2007). Biography of Qazvini, sources for the study of the conflict at Shaykh Tabarsi, and Qazvini's narrative. Includes the Persian text, and bios of Táríkh Samandar and M. A. Malik-Khusravi (in Persian). [about]
 
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