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Search for tag "Indigenous people"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1982 19 – 20 Jun The teaching project Camino Del Sol (Trail of Light), comprising indigenous believers from North America, is formed on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona, United States. [BW18:239]
  • The team travels through Central and South America in a programme of cultural exchange. [BW18:172]
  • For a report of the project and pictures see BW18:239–45 and BW19:74–6.
Arizona; United States Indigenous people; Native Americans; Navajo (Dine)
1990 Ridván For the first time, two Bush Negro women delegates attend the national convention of Surinam. [BINS226:6] Suriname Indigenous people; National conventions; Conventions
1993 Oct The Australian Bahá'í community and the Arrente Aboriginal tribe co-sponsor an intercultural celebration of indigenous peoples, ‘Heart of Australia Calling' in Alice Springs to mark UN International Year for the World's Indigenous Peoples. [BW93–4:90] Alice Springs; Australia Indigenous people; Cultural diversity; United Nations
1994 Summer A Maoris teaching team visited British Columbia. The visit was reciprocated by The Journey of Teech-ma, the First Nations Travel Teaching Trip to the South Pacific. See entry for 24 March, 1997. [SDSC370] British Columbia; Canada; Australia; New Zealand First Nations; Maoris; Indigenous people; Travel teaching
1997. 24 Mar - 16 May The nine member First Nations Travel Teaching Trip to the South Pacific, called "The Journey of Teech-ma" consisted of Canadian Bahá'ís from Kwakiutl, Nuu-Cha-Nuth, the Ojibway First Nations, a Yupik Bahá'í from Alaska and three non-Native Canadian friends. They shared their culture and their Faith with the Maori, other New Zealanders, the Aborigines and other Australians as well as the ne-Vanuatu peoples. See entry for 1994 Summer. [SDSC370] New Zealand; Australia; Vanuatu; Canada First Nations; Travel Teaching; Pacific; Maoris; Aboriginal people; Indigenous people
2007 13 Sep The General Assembly of the United Nations adopted the resolution entitled United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. [United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples]
  • The vote was passed by a majority of 144 states in favour, 4 votes against (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States) and 11 abstentions (Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burundi, Colombia, Georgia, Kenya, Nigeria, Russian Federation, Samoa and Ukraine). Since that time, the four countries voting against have reversed their position and now support the Declaration. [Division for Social Policy and Development Indigenous Peoples website]
    • In November 2010, Canada issued a Statement of Support endorsing the principles of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
    • In November 2015, the Prime Minister of Canada asked the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs and other ministers, in the mandate letters, to implement the declaration.
    • In May 2016, the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs announced Canada is now a full supporter, without qualification, of the declaration.
  • For an Historical Overview of the resolution see Division for Social Policy and Development Indigenous Peoples website.
  • The text of the Resolution A/RES/61/295 has been published in a number of languages and is also available in an "Adolescent-Friendly Version of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples".
New York UN; United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

from the main catalogue

  1. Aboriginal and Indigenous People, Teaching Among, by Shoghi Effendi, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 3 (2000). Importance and scope of the teaching work among the masses of various countries and their aboriginal and indigenous inhabitants. [about]
  2. American Indians and the Bahá'í Faith: Ten-Part Comprehensive Bibliography (2017). An extensive bibliography about references to Native Americans in Baha’i sacred writings, in writings by Baha’i authors, in Baha’i periodicals, and in other Baha’i media. [about]
  3. Australian Bahá'í Studies: Vol. 2 (2000). The complete issue of volume 2. Some papers were delivered at the 18th annual ABS conference "The Creative Inspiration: Arts and Culture in the Bahá’í Faith" (Melbourne, September 1999). [about]
  4. Diné Becoming Baha'i: Through the Lens of Ancient Prophecies, by Linda S. Covey (2011). Some Diné (Navajo) convert to the Baha'i Faith because it fulfills their ancient prophecies, its institutions provide autonomy and empower the Diné people, and Baha'i values of cultural diversity allow Diné to practice their traditional ways. [about]
  5. Encouragement, Challenges, Healing, and Progress: The Bahá'í Faith in Indigenous Communities, by Alfred Kahn, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:3 (2016). On the challenges of community-building among Indigenous people, written from the perspective of a childhood spent among Baha'i pioneers on Native American land, and on reconciling traditional views with global Baha'i teachings. [about]
  6. Faith and Works: Maoris and the Baha'i Faith (1995). The transcript of an interview with two New Zealand Baha'is, Huti Toataua and Hedi Moani, aired by the New Zealand National Radio show "Faith and Works" (May, 1995) on "the growing relationship between the Maori community and the Baha'i Faith." [about]
  7. Indigenous rights and women's rights in the Samoan Bahá'í community, by Maureen Sier, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  8. Lonely road to native title determination, A, by Walter Waia, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). A personal account of the Saibai Island Native Title Claim: a story of an Indigenous Australian who "walked a learning road to fulfill his obligations to his family, his clan and to the community." [about]
  9. Men and the Baha'i Faith: The role of indigenous men in the early Baha'i community in the British Isles, by Lil Osborn (2016). Includes slide-show included when presenting the paper at the Baha'i Studies Seminar, Kellogg College, Oxford (July 2016). [about]
  10. Message to the Indian and Eskimo Bahá'ís of the Western Hemisphere, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1969). An overview of the Baha'i Faith, written to the native Inuit and First Nations peoples of North America. [about]
  11. Monotheistic Religion in Africa: The Example of the Swazi People, by Margaret Pemberton-Pigott and Crispin Pemberton-Pigott, in Bahá'í Faith and the World's Religions (2005). Similarities between the Baha'i Faith and the ancient traditional beliefs of the Swazi people of Southern Africa. [about]
  12. Native Bahá'ís: Bios of past and contemporary Bahá'ís of native ancestry (2014). Links to photographs and information from the 1910s to the present about Native Baha'is, both from the United States, Canada, Hawaii, and Alaska, and indigenous Baha'is elsewhere around the world. [about]
  13. Navajo Tradition, The: Transition to the Bahá'í Faith, by Linda S. Covey, in Images, imaginations, and beyond: proceedings of the 8th Native American Symposium, November 2009, ed. Mark B. Spencer (2010). Examines three reasons behind the conversion of some Navajo to Baha'i in the early 1960s: fulfillment of prophecy, cultural empowerment and autonomy, and protection of traditional practices. [about]
  14. Perfection and Refinement: Towards an Aesthetics of the Bab, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). The writings of the Bab have implications for the "plastic" arts; significance for native traditions; relevance to the performing arts; and the concept of refinement which comes across in both the person and the writings of the Báb. [about]
  15. Prevención de Discriminaciones y Protección a las Minorías, 1988, by Bahá'í International Community. [about]
  16. Prevención de Discriminaciones y Protección a las Minorías, 1989, by Bahá'í International Community. [about]
  17. Return to Tyendinaga: The Story of Jim and Melba Loft, Bahá'í Pioneers: Review, by Lee Brown (2013). History of the first Aboriginal believers in Canada, who moved from Michigan to pioneer in the Tyendinaga First Nation in Ontario in 1948. [about]
  18. Scholarship from an Aboriginal Perspective, by Diana Rose Yoka, in Bahá'í Studies in Australasia vol. 3 (1996). [about]
  19. Something Regal: Uncle Fred Murray Extracts from a compilation of tributes, photographs and stories, by June Perkins, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). Stories about and pictures of Fred Murray, an early Indigenous Baha’i. [about]
  20. Special Report on Baha'i Burial vs. Maori Custom, by National Spiritual Assembly of New Zealand (1989). Special report about reconciling Baha'i burial laws with local maori customs where they conflict; includes guidance from the Universal House of Justice. [about]
  21. Universities as the Gatekeepers of the Intellectual Property of Indigenous People's Medical Knowledge, by Chris Jones Kavelin, in Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, Volume 37 (2008). While this article is inspired by Baha'i principles, it has no mention of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  22. Why Indigenous Peoples Are Distinctive, by Sue Podger, in Bahá'í Studies in Australasia vol. 3 (1996). [about]
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