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Search for tag "Jesus"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1852 Oct Bahá'u'lláh has a vision of the Maiden, who announces to Him that He is the Manifestation of God for this Age. [BBD142–3, 212; BKG823 ESW11–12, 21 GPB101–2; KAN62]

  • This experience compares to the episode of Moses and the Burning Bush, Zoroaster and the Seven Visions, Buddha under the Bodhi tree, the descent of the Dove upon Jesus and the voice of Gabriel commanding Muhammad to ‘cry in the name of thy Lord'. [GPB93, 101]
  • The Báb repeatedly gave the year nine as the date of the appearance of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. The Declaration of the Báb took place in AH 1260; year nine was therefore AH 1269, which began in the middle of October when Bahá'u'lláh had been in prison for about two months. [CB46–7]
  • Subsequently in His Writings Bahá’u’lláh declared that He was the "Promised One" of all religions, fulfilling the messianic prophecies found in world religions. He stated that being several messiahs converging one person were the spiritual, rather than material, fulfilment of the messianic and eschatological prophecies found in the literature of the major religions. His eschatological claims constitute six distinctive messianic identifications: from Judaism, the incarnation of the "Everlasting Father" from the Yuletide prophecy of Isaiah 9:6, the "Lord of Hosts"; from Christianity, the "Spirit of Truth" or Comforter predicted by Jesus in His farewell discourse of John 14-17 and the return of Christ "in the glory of the Father"; from Zoroastrianism, the return of Shah Bahram Varjavand, a Zoroastrian messiah predicted in various late Pahlavi texts; from Shi'a Islam the return of the Third Imam, Imam Husayn; from Sunni Islam, the return of Jesus, Isa; and from the Bábí religion, He whom God shall make manifest.

    While Bahá’u’lláh did not explicitly state Himself to be either the Hindu or Buddhist messiah, He did so in principle through His writings. Later, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated that Bahá’u’lláh was the Kalki avatar, who in the classical Hindu Vaishnavas tradition, is the tenth and final avatar (great incarnation) of Vishnu who will come to end The Age of Darkness and Destruction. Bahá’ís also believe that Bahá’u’lláh is the fulfilment of the prophecy of appearance of the Maitreya Buddha, who is a future Buddha who will eventually appear on Earth, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure Dharma. Bahá’ís believe that the prophecy that Maitreya will usher in a new society of tolerance and love has been fulfilled by Bahá’u’lláh's teachings on world peace. [Bahaikipedia]

Iran; Persia Baha'u'llah; vision; maid; angels; Manifestation; Moses; Burning Bush; Zoroaster; Seven Visions; Buddha; Bodhi tree; Dove; Jesus; Gabriel; Muhammad; Bab; Declaration
1966 Jesus Bias Manibusan of Sinajana, Guam, the first Chamorro to become a Bahá’í, enrols. Sinajana; Guam Jesus Bias Manibusan

from the main catalogue

  1. Absolute Poverty and Utter Nothingness, by Rodney H. Clarken, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). Bahá’u’lláh’s ideas of poverty as detachment, and nothingness as selflessness. Cites some commonalities in concepts of detachment and nothingness from Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Muhammad and Socrates as five of the greatest philosophers or prophets. [about]
  2. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Baha (1990). [about]
  3. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2014). New 2014 translation (with a version side-by-side with the original). [about]
  4. Behold the Man: Baha'u'llah on the Life of Jesus, by Juan Cole, in Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 65:1 (1997). Baha'u'llah's lessons from the Judeo-Christian experience for founding a new, post-Islamic religion; invoking Christ to illuminate contemporary situations within Babi-Bahá'í history; implications for his relations with Middle Eastern Christians. [about]
  5. Behold the Man: Baha'u'llah on the Life of Jesus, by Juan Cole: Review, by Christopher Buck (1997). [about]
  6. Birth and Call of Jesus Christ: A Bahá'í-inspired retelling, by David Merrick (2010). The story of the birth of Jesus and his call to the world of humanity. [about]
  7. Christ and Baha'u'llah, by George Townshend (1957). The Kingdom of God, as foretold in the Bible, has come and Baha'u'llah is the Return of Christ. [about]
  8. Christ, Return of: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (1994). Some Christian prophecies and their fulfillment in the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  9. Christianity from a Bahá'í Perspective, by Robert Stockman (1998). Includes two topics: "A Baha'i approach to the Bible" and "Baha'i Writings on Jesus Christ." [about]
  10. Deification of Jesus, The, by Jack McLean, in World Order (1980). The apotheosis of Christ is a common factor to all branches of Christianity. This paper examines the historical development of this belief, from the writings of St. Paul, gnosticism, and the debates between Arius, Cyril, and Nestorius. Also in French. [about]
  11. Does Corinthians 1:15 Teach a Physical or a Spiritual Resurrection?, by David Friedman (1999). While literalists claim that this verse supports a physical resurrection, the evidence seems to show the exact opposite to be true. [about]
  12. Images of Christ in the writings of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, The, by Maryam Afshar, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
  13. Internet Communications; Virgin Birth; Encyclopedia; Administrative Order, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Questions on email discussion groups and the Covenant, the Baha'i stance on the Virgin Birth of Christ, the spirituality of administrating, the spiritual destiny of the American Baha'i community, and the status of the Baha'i Encyclopedia. [about]
  14. Jesus and Early Christianity in the Gospels: A New Dialogue, by Daniel Grolin: Review, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 11 (2003). [about]
  15. Jesus asks all people 'Who do people say that I am?': Replies from several non-Christians, by Christopher Buck and et al., in Ottawa Citizen (1997). A short collection of non-Christian perspectives on Jesus, published in commemoration of Easter. [about]
  16. Jesus Christ in the Bahá'í Writings, by Robert Stockman, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 2:1 (1992). While Christians traditionally believe the Gospels to be substantially accurate, little is known about Jesus and what he actually taught; the Baha'i writings fill in many of these gaps. [about]
  17. Jesus Christ in the Bahá'í Writings, by Robert Stockman: Review: Commentary concerning the differences between Christian and Bahá'í terminology, by Michael W. Sours, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 3:1 (1993). Discusses the station and titles of Christ in an attempt to find common ground with Christians. [about]
  18. Jesus Christ, Resurrection of, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi. [about]
  19. Jesus the Son of God and the Incarnation Doctrine, by Antonella Khursheed and Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). The Baha'i approach to the sonship and divinity of Christ is consistent with Old and New Testament usage. It examines the Incarnation Doctrine, the roots of which can be traced to pagan influences coloring Christian belief in its early centuries. [about]
  20. Keys to the Proper Understanding of Islam in The Dispensation of Baha'u'llah, by Brian Wittman, in Lights of Irfan, 2 (2001). [about]
  21. Notes on the Christian "Antichrist" and Titles of Christ, by Dann J. May (1997). Intro for a Baha'i-Christian dialogue on the meaning of the antichrist, titles of Jesus in the Baha'i Sacred Writings, and brief compilation of Baha'i writings. [about]
  22. Resurrection and Return of Jesus, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). The body of Christ; the burial of Christ; His return; and explaining the Baha'i view to Christians. [about]
  23. Tablet of the Son (Jesus) (2001). A tablet, partly written to a Christian priest, on the effect of Christ's revelation and Baha'u'llah's status as the return of Christ. [about]
  24. Tafsir and the Meaning of the Qur'an: The Crucifixion in Muslim Thought, by Todd Lawson (2010). Using Qur'án 4:156-7 as an example, classical tafsīr, “scholastic" exegesis, has not always taken account of the way all Muslims understand the Quranic text. Other understandings may be found in poetry, philosophy, mysticism and even historical writing. [about]
 
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