Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "Knowledge"

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  1. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Baha (1990). [about]
  2. Answered Questions, Some: A Philosophical Perspective, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). Philosophical foundations of the Bahá’í teachings, including ontology, theology, epistemology, philosophical anthropology and psychology, and personal and social ethics. [about]
  3. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2014). New 2014 translation (with a version side-by-side with the original). [about]
  4. Articulating a Consultative Epistemology: Toward a Reconciliation of Truth and Relativism, by Todd Smith and Michael Karlberg, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 19 (2009). Epistemology has a perennial tension between two contrasting approaches to knowledge: the search for foundational truth vs. the relativity of truth. Consultation can help resolve paradoxical truth claims to develop an integrative approach to knowledge. [about]
  5. Bahá'í Community as a Learning Organisation, The, by Roy Steiner, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 6 (1996). How a knowledge management system focussed on assisting individuals, communities and institutions could improve their success. Followed by commentaries by Kambiz Maani and Svenja Tams. [about]
  6. Bahá'í Epistemology, by Peter Terry (2004). Statements of Abdu'l-Baha on the four modes of knowledge: sense perception, reason, tradition, and inspiration. All must defer to the divine standard. [about]
  7. Commentary on the Saying "Knowledge is Twenty-Seven Letters", A, by Mirza Abu'l-Fadl Gulpaygani, in Letters & Essays 1886-1913 (1985). An explanation of a saying of Imám Ja'far as Sádiq, which was quoted in the Kitáb-i-Iqán, about the Promised One bringing the remaining 25 letters of knowledge. [about]
  8. Education and the Supreme Talisman in the Kitáb-i-Íqán, by Melissa Tansik (1999). How the Kitab-i-Iqan can be seen as a compendium of what humankind needs to know; a discussion of perception as it relates to learning what is needful; intellectual honesty; and the results of various learning experiences. [about]
  9. “First we speak of logical proofs': Discourse of knowledge in the Bahá'í writings, by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). [about]
  10. Generation of Knowledge and the Advancement of Civilization, by Haleh Arbab (2007). [about]
  11. "He hath known God who hath known himself": A Deepening Course on the Bahá'í Revelation (2012). A lengthy compilation by the granddaughter of Howard Colby Ives designed to be a study guide to the Writings, covering knowledge of God, the station of the Manifestations, the nature of the Covenant, and the dynamics of creation, constancy, and servitude. [about]
  12. Human Intellect, The: A Bahá'í-Inspired Perspective, by Adrian John Davis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  13. Human Knowledge and the Advancement of Society, by Hoda Mahmoudi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 22 (2012). Knowledge is the means toward realizing a global civilization. The current Five Year Plan focuses the Baha'i community’s consultation, reflection, and global growth, and the individual’s applying spiritual and secular knowledge to help this process. [about]
  14. Integrative Approach to Knowledge and Action: A Baha'i Perspective, by Behrooz Sabet, in Converging Realities, 1:1 (2000). A conceptual base for the development of an integrative approach to the study of the Baha'i Faith, based largely on the harmony of science and religion. [about]
  15. Intellectual Life of the Bahá'í Community, The, by Farzam Arbab, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:4 (2016). The 34th Hasan M. Balyuzi Memorial Lecture at the ABS conference in Montreal, on the need for us to have intellectual courage, a lack of elitism, and the harmony of science and religion. Includes video, published version, and an outline of the talk. [about]
  16. Knowledge, by Paul Lample (2005). [about]
  17. Knowledge of God, The: An Essay on Bahá'í Epistemology, by Jack McLean, in World Order (1978). Knowledge of the divine is the beginning of all things. This can come through the investigative faculty, the path of reason, or through intuition and mysticism, the path of the heart. [about]
  18. Knowledge, Certitude and the Mystical Heart: The Hidden Essence of God's Word, by LeRoy Jones, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
  19. Language of the Heart, The: Parallels between Chinese and Bahá'í Approaches to the Spiritual Self, by Sim Tze Hong, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Parallels between Chinese and Confucian thought vs. Bahá'í teachings about the spiritual self, the nature of the heart, the pathway to perfection, the knowledge of oneself, and symbolism in language like "open heart" and "use heart." [about]
  20. Letters and Essays, 1886-1913, by Mirza Abu'l-Fadl Gulpaygani (1985). Treatises of "the greatest and most learned of all Bahá'í scholars" about Alexander Tumansky; on meeting Abdu'l-Baha; and on the meaning of angels, resurrection, civilization, tests, angels, holy spirit, and the saying "Knowledge is twenty-seven letters." [about]
  21. Minimalism from a Bahá'í Perspective, by Mahyad Zaerpoor Rahnamaie, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
  22. Prejudice and Discrimination, by Will C. van den Hoonaard (1993). Prejudice is cultural. History shows no society is immune. U.S. Baha'is facilitated Racial Amity groups in the 20s and 30s, and found ignorance plus apathy are key factors in prejudice. Reducing it requires a universal commitment to the unity of humanity. [about]
  23. Psychology and Knowledge of Self, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
  24. Purposes and Objectives of Bahá'í Scholarship, The: Compilation and commentary, by Peter Terry (2009). Three essays on objectives of Bahá'í Scholarship, attaining to the knowledge of God, and the study of philosophy. [about]
  25. Rationality in Academic Disciplines, by K. P. Mohanan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). For an academic community to construct knowledge through teamwork, its members must have a shared language with the same pairings of concepts and words, and they must have shared epistemic values by which to "dialogue" and base collective decisions. [about]
  26. Reflections on the Epistemological Views of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Mikhael Sergeev, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 22 (2012). Abdu’l-Bahá explored four sources of knowledge—sensory perception, reason, intuition, and tradition—to examine the importance of scripture, limitations of human knowledge, distinctions between objective and subjective knowledge, and between human/divine. [about]
  27. SunWALK: A Bahá'í-inspired Model of Education, by Roger Prentice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  28. Towards a Definition of Bahá'í Theology and Mystical Philosophy, by Julio Savi, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 11 (2003). Baha'i theology is not metaphysical hair-splitting but is a "divine philosophy" all Baha'is are invited to study, to achieve inner knowledge, spiritual progress, and an enhanced capacity for loving. [about]
  29. Unrestrained as the Wind: A Life Dedicated to Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Compilation of quotations on topics of especial interest to Bahá'í youth. [about]
  30. Will, Knowledge, and Love as Explained in Baha'u'llah's Four Valleys, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:1 (1994). Exploration of some of the "seemingly abstruse" concepts of the Four Valleys. [about]
 
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