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Search for tag "Metaphors"

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  1. Artist, Seeker and Seer: A vocabulary and a perspective for the appreciation and creation of art inspired by the Bahá'í Writings, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Bahá'í Studies, 10 (1982). Imagery and metaphors from the Baha'i Writings guide the appreciation and creation of art. They demonstrate that criticism vs creativity, logic vs. passion, and historicity vs. poetry have already been brought to a state of unity. [about]
  2. Bahá'í World, The: Volume 18 (1979-1983), in Bahá'í World (1986). [about]
  3. Celestial Burning, A: A Selective Study of the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Jack McLean (2012). Style, content, and context of World Order of Baha'u'llah and Dispensation of Baha'u'llah: part of chapter 1 of this lengthy analysis of the work of Shoghi Effendi (pages 1-71), offered as a sample. [about]
  4. City of the Heart, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2004). Literal and metaphorical references to "heart." [about]
  5. Clouds and the Hiding God: Observations on some Terms in the Early Writing of Bahá'u'lláh, by Moshe Sharon, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Metaphorical usage of clouds and rain in the mystical Tablets Rashh-i-Amá, Lawh Kullu't-Ta'ám, and Qasídiyyih-Varqá'iyyih. [about]
  6. Coherent Chaos and Chaotic Cosmos: The Qur'ān and the Symmetry of Truth, by Todd Lawson, in Weltkonstruktionen: Religiöse Weltdeutung zwischen Chaos und Kosmos vom Alten Orient bis zum Islam (2010). While at first glance the Qur'an appears to be chaotic in form and structure, on closer examination it reveals an interconnected logic of content, performance, imagery, grammar, and poetics. Article does not mention the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  7. Discourses of Knowledge, by Frank Lewis, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought, ed. John Danesh, Seena Fazel (2004). Many statements in the Writings are couched in terms of a particular discourse, or intellectual tradition, for their immediate audience. Understanding context can help evaluate whether any given statement is meant as factual truth or as metaphor. [about]
  8. Hidden Words: Allusion to Progressive Revelation in Persian HW #77, by Daryl Lowery (1999). Student paper, exploring one of the longest and more mystical Hidden Words. [about]
  9. Introduction to the Lawh-i Haqqu'n-Nas, An, by Jean-Marc Lepain, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Summary of the tablet Lawh-i Haqqu’n-Nas, Tablet of the "Right of the People," on the metaphorical character of this world. [about]
  10. Kitáb-i-Aqdas (Most Holy Book): Notes on the "choice wine", by Abdu'l-Bahá and Brent Poirier (2000). [about]
  11. Letter to Frau Alice Schwarz-Solivo of a Talk by Abdu'l-Baha, by Josephina Fallscheer, in Der Sonner Der Wahrheit (1935). [about]
  12. Life as Metaphor, by John S. Hatcher, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). [about]
  13. Metaphor and the Language of Revelation, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). [about]
  14. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Baha'u'llah in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
  15. Postsecular Look at the Reading Motif in Bahiyyih Nakhjavani's The Woman Who Read Too Much, A, by Mary A. Sobhani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:1-2 (2015). Nakhjavani’s historical novel includes metaphors that underscore a link between the secular and the sacred through the material and metaphysical act of reading; cf. McClure’s Partial Faiths: Postsecular Fiction in the Age of Pynchon and Morrison. [about]
  16. Sacred Mythology and the Bahá'í Faith, by William P. Collins, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:4 (1990). [about]
  17. Sin-covering Gaze, by Universal House of Justice (2001). Brief explanation of a possible source for a story of Christ told by Abdu'l-Baha about encountering a dead dog and commenting on the beauty of its teeth; i.e., having a "sin-covering gaze." [about]
  18. Springtime metaphors and spring-related imagery, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (1995). Introduction and Compilation, interspersed with editorial comments. Includes discussion of "plain English" translation. [about]
  19. Study of the Pen Motif in the Bahá'í Writings, A, by Kavian Sadeghzade Milani and Nafeh Fananapazir, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:1 (1999). Theology and background of the "pen" metaphor — the creative force presented by the Manifestation of God — and the "tablet" — the recipient of the creative force. Also the five realms of existence: Háhút, Láhút, Jabarút, Malakút, and Násút. [about]
  20. Stylistic Analysis of the Báb's Writings, A: Abridged Translation of Vahid Behmardi's Muqaddamih-yi dar bárih-yi sabk va siyáq-i áthár-i mubárakih-yi ḥaḍrat-i rabb a`lá, by Vahid Behmardi and William F. McCants, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). English translation by McCants of Behmardi's Persian article "Stylistic Analysis of the Báb’s Writings". [about]
  21. Tablet of Patience (Surih Sabr): Declaration of Bahá'u'lláh and Selected Topics, by Foad Seddigh, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). This significant Tablet from Ridvan 1863 covers the Seal of the Prophets, appearance and presence of God, resurrection, and the Qayyum al-Asma. Includes context of Baha'u'llah's life and troubles during this period. [about]
  22. Tablet of the Nightingale and the Owl (1863). The Tablet of the Nightingale and the Owl is a short story, which reads like a fairy tale, about the search for the Beloved. [about]
 
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