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Search for tag "Migration"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1996 30 May - 14 Jun The Bahá'í International Community and 150 Bahá'ís from many countries participated in the Second United Nations Conference on Human Settlements (Habitat II) and the parallel Non-Governmental Organization Forum in Istanbul. [BINS365:5] Istanbul; Turkey BIC; United Nations; Migration
1997 (In the year) The Tahirih Justice Center was founded to address the acute need for legal services of immigrant and refugee women who have fled to the U.S. to seek protection from human rights abuses.
  • The Center's founder, Ms. Layli Miller, created the Center after she was besieged by requests for legal assistance following her involvement in a high-profile case that set national precedent and revolutionized asylum law in the United States. The case was that of Fauziya Kassindja, a 17 year-old woman who fled Togo in fear of a forced polygamous marriage and a tribal practice known as female genital mutilation. After arriving in the U.S. and spending more than seventeen months in detention, Ms. Kassindja was granted asylum on June 13th, 1996 by the United States Board of Immigration Appeals in a decision that opened the door to gender-based persecution as a grounds for asylum. [Tahirih Justice Center]
  • For more on the Tahirih Justice Center see article in the Religion News Service.
  • United States Tahirih Justice Center; Human rights; Women; Refugees; Migration; Layli Miller-Muro

    from the main catalogue

    1. Bahá'í Community of Iran, The: Patterns of Exile and Problems of Communication, by Moojan Momen, in Iranian Refugees and Exiles Since Khomeini, ed. Asghar Fathi (1991). [about]
    2. Challenge of Change for the Chinese in Southeast Asia, The, by Yin Hong Shuen, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Chinese Bahá'ís in some Asian countries are a microcosm of Chinese people in this region. An email survey asked what attracts Southeast Asians to the Faith, difficulties they face, and how adopting a world religion helps guide their future challenges. [about]
    3. Dissimulation by Iranian Emmigrants, by Universal House of Justice and National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States (1985). Letters from the House and the US NSA concerning Baha'is who were able to escape Iran in 1997 by denying their Faith. [about]
    4. Domestic Temporalities: Sensual Patterning in Persian Migratory Landscapes, by Simone Dennis and Megan Warin, in Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, 7:2 (2007). Embodied paths of patterning, memory and emotion amongst Persian immigrant women in Adelaide, especially the Baha'i expatriate community. Link to document (offsite). [about]
    5. Duty of Kindness and Sympathy Towards Strangers, The, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). Integrating immigrants into the culture of their new country is becoming a focus in some Western states. In 2007 the Italian government issued a “Charter on the Values and Significance of Citizenship and Integration,” which reflects such Baha'i ideals. [about]
    6. Ireland's Multi-Ethnic Immigration Challenge: An Irish Bahá'í View, by Eamonn Moane, in Solas, 2 (2002). After centuries of population loss, Ireland’s economic success in the 1990s led to a surge of immigration, but its reaction to a multi-ethnic influx has been disappointing. It needs Baha'i approaches like consultation, tolerance, fairness, and morality. [about]
    7. Migrants and Refugees in Europe, by Universal House of Justice (2015). Principles to guide the response of the Bahá’í community to the dramatic social changes concerning the 2015 influx into Europe of people fleeing conflict in the Middle East, especially Syria. [about]
    8. Persian Bahá'ís in Australia, by Graham Hassall, in Religion and Ethnic Identity, An Australian Study, Abe Ata, ed. (1989). Overview of the history and modern activities (ca. 1989) of the Persian Baha'i community in Australia. [about]
    9. Persian-speaking Believers in Anglophone Communities, by Universal House of Justice, in Bahá'í Canada, 8:6 (1996). Some Persian expatriates feel deprived of participation in Baha'i gatherings because of an inability to understand English. [about]
    10. Quiet Exodus, A, by Geoffrey Cameron, in Literary Review of Canada (2013). Recent history of immigration law and practice in Canada, and the Baha'i community's involvement in governmental change. Includes addendum from Baha'i News Canada. [about]
    11. Transmission of Cultural Values in Persian Bahá'í Families, The, by Stephen Licata (1997). Includes a survey on cultural values in Persian Bahá’í families. [about]
    12. Unity in Diversity: Acceptance and Integration in an Era of Intolerance and Fragmentation, by Roxanne Lalonde (1994). Short excerpt from thesis, edited as a stand-alone article. [about]
    13. Women and Religious Change: A case study in the colonial migrant experience, by Miriam Dixson, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). The story of Margaret Dixson, and one woman's growth from Anglicanism, via numerology and astrology, to commitment to the world ideals of the Baha'i Faith. [about]
     
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