Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.

Search for tag "Millennialism"

from the main catalogue

  1. Attempted Assassination of Nasir al Din Shah in 1852, The: Millennialism and Violence, by Moojan Momen (2004). A new account of the events of 1852, referencing a document that has not been previously used which sheds a different light on the events; also broader context of the study of violent millennialists and contemporary incidents like Waco and Aum Shinrikyo. [about]
  2. Bahá'ísm: History, Transfiguration, Doxa, by Hutan Hejazi Martinez (2010). An outsider's view of the role of ideologies in a postmodern era, focusing on Baha'i history, conversion narratives, ideology, and other competing philosophies. (Link to thesis, offsite.) [about]
  3. Brief Introduction to Millennial Zeal in the Nineteenth Century, A, by Chris Manvell and Carolyn Sparey-Gillies (1997). [about]
  4. Catastrophe, Armageddon and Millennium: Some aspects of the Bábí-Bahá'í exegesis of apocalyptic symbolism, by Stephen Lambden, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  5. Catastrophe, Armageddon and Millennium: Some Aspects of the Bábí-Bahá'í Exegesis of Apocalyptic Symbolism, by Stephen Lambden: Commentary, "The Apocalyptic Upheaval Completed?", by William P. Collins, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). Commentary on earlier article by Stephen Lambden. [about]
  6. Der Messianismus des frühen 19. Jahrhunderts und die Entstehung der Baha'i Religion, by Kamran Ekbal, in Iran im 19. Jahrhundert und die Entstehung der Bahá'í Religion, eds. Johann Christoph Bürgel and Isabel Schayani (1998). On the resurgence of a millenarianistic climate in the 19th century from China through the Middle-East to the USA. It highlights the millenniarist mood in Iran at the time of the beginnings of the Babi and Bahai religions. [about]
  7. Iranian Millenarianism and Democratic Thought in the Nineteenth Century, by Juan Cole, in International Journal of Middle East Studies, 24:1 (1992). [about]
  8. Millennialism in Modern Iranian History, by Juan Cole, in Imagining the End: Visions of Apocalypse from the Ancient Middle East to Modern America, eds. Abbas Amanat and Magnus Bernhardsson (2002). Religions in Iran have been volatile and evolving, from a tool of the establishment to representing the voice of the oppressed, from passive to revolutionary. Baha'u'llah adapted these motifs to create a vehicle for socially-liberal and democratic ideals. [about]
  9. "Wonderful True Visions": Magic, Mysticism, and Millennialism in the Making of the American Bahai Community, 1892-1895, by Richard Hollinger, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought (2004). The early growth of the American, and especially the Chicago, communities was more gradual and eclectic than previously thought, and Kheiralla's influence was less crucial. [about]
 
See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.
Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
.
. .