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Search for tag "Philosophy"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1918 8 Jan President Woodrow Wilson in a speech on war aims and peace terms to the United States Congress outlined his Fourteen Points. It was a statement of principles for peace that was to be used for peace negotiations in order to end World War I. President Wilson was influenced by the Bahá’í Teachings in formulating his Fourteen Points, at least three Bahá’í volumes were known to be in the White House. The Hidden Words appears on a 1921 listing of Wilson’s private library. Also, a compilation on peace given the President by a delegation of Washington Bahá’ís ‘turned up in general reference at the Library of Congress marked “transfer from the White House”‘. And Abdul-Baha on Divine Philosophy (Boston, 1918) is said to have much influenced his thinking. [AY155]

Commenting on the Fourteen Points laid down by the President for the world community, the Master says that twelve of them derive from principles advocated by Bahá’u’lláh fifty years before, and that these Teachings had been spread worldwide through various publications, thus becoming known to leaders in Europe and America (Persian Tablets, vol. III, p. 312). [AY156-157]

United States; Washinton DC Woodrow Wilson; Fourteen Points; History (general); Principles; Abdul-Baha, Writings and talks of; Abdul-Baha on Divine Philosophy; Peace; World War I; War (general); United States, Presidents; Z****
2003 Jun The publication of Minimalism: A Bridge between Classical Philosophy and the Bahá'í Revelation by Dr. William Hatcher. In it he offers a logical proof for the existence of God. He concludes that the application of the principles of relational logic to this question prove that there is a single, universal, and eternal First Cause — something that is very much like God the Creator as named in all of the world's major religions. [BWNS226] Philosophy; God (general); William Hatcher; BWNS

from the main catalogue

  1. 'Abdu'l-Bahá on Divine Philosophy, by Abdu'l-Bahá (1918). An early collection of writings and talks of Abdu'l-Baha. [about]
  2. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Response to Darwinism: Its Historical and Philosophical Context, by Keven Brown, in Evolution and Bahá'í Belief, Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 12 (2001). Editor's foreword to the collection of articles Evolution and Baha'i Belief. [about]
  3. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Response to the Doctrine of the Unity of Existence, by Keven Brown, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 11:3-4 (2001). [about]
  4. Absolute Poverty and Utter Nothingness, by Rodney H. Clarken, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). Bahá’u’lláh’s ideas of poverty as detachment, and nothingness as selflessness. Cites some commonalities in concepts of detachment and nothingness from Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Muhammad and Socrates as five of the greatest philosophers or prophets. [about]
  5. Achieving Planetary Consciousness: Reality, Reason, and Revelation, by William S. Hatcher (2008). [about]
  6. Alain Locke: Baha'i Philosopher, by Christopher Buck, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). Biography of one of the important African American intellectuals and his impact on American thought and culture. Includes two letters written by or on behalf of Shoghi Effendi. [about]
  7. Alain Locke, by Christopher Buck, in American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, Supplement XIV (2004). [about]
  8. Alain Locke: Faith and Philosophy, by Christopher Buck (2005). [about]
  9. Alain Locke: Bahá'í Principles and the Salvation of Democracy, by Christopher Buck (2007). Long presentation in slide format on the history and influence of Alain Locke. [about]
  10. Alain Locke: 'Race Amity' and the Bahá'í Faith, by Christopher Buck (2007). Presentation in slide format about the "First Black Rhodes Scholar." [about]
  11. Alain Locke and Cultural Pluralism, by Christopher Buck, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought (2004). [about]
  12. Alain Locke: Faith and Philosophy, by Christopher Buck: Review, by Derik Smith, in World Order, 38:3 (2008). [about]
  13. Alain Locke: Faith and Philosophy, by Christopher Buck: Reviews, by William P. Collins and Anthony Fitchue (2006). Three reviews of the book Alain Locke: Faith and Philosophy. [about]
  14. Alain Locke: Race Leader, Social Philosopher, Baha'i Pluralist: includes Alain Locke in his Own Words: Three Essays and a poem, by Christopher Buck and Alain Locke, in World Order, 36:3 (2005). Article by Buck, poem "The Moon Maiden" and three essays by Locke introduced by Buck: "The Gospel for the Twentieth Century," "Peace between Black and White in the United States," and "Five Phases of Democracy: Farewell Address at Talladega College." [about]
  15. Alain Locke: Race Leader, Social Philosopher, Bahá'í Pluralist: 94th Annual Commemoration of ‘Abdu'l-Baha's 1912 Visit to Howard University, by Christopher Buck (2006). Available both as audio and PDF, and includes press release. [about]
  16. Andalusí Theosophy: A Recontextualization, by Vahid Brown, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  17. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Baha (1990). [about]
  18. Answered Questions, Some: Study Outline (2002). [about]
  19. Answered Questions, Some: A Philosophical Perspective, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). Philosophical foundations of the Bahá’í teachings, including ontology, theology, epistemology, philosophical anthropology and psychology, and personal and social ethics. [about]
  20. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2014). New 2014 translation (with a version side-by-side with the original). [about]
  21. Antinomies of Reason and the Theology of Revelation: Some Preliminary Thoughts, by Nader Saiedi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:4 (1998). [about]
  22. Approach of Abdu'l-Baha to the Problem of Tolerance, The, by Erfan Sabeti (2003). Exploring the differences between forbearance, indifference, acceptance, turning away, freedom, and tolerance, to distinguish matters of opinion and belief from scientific and aesthetic ones. [about]
  23. Archeology of the Kingdom of God, The, by Jean-Marc Lepain (2015). Analysis of the spiritual worlds as depicted in philosophical and religious texts, from ancient the Greek to Jewish, Christian and Muslim thought, contrasted with the theosophy, metaphysics, anthropology, and hermeneutics of Baha'u'llah and 'Abdu'l-Baha. [about]
  24. Aristotelian Substratum of the Bahá'í Writings, The, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
  25. Articulating a Consultative Epistemology: Toward a Reconciliation of Truth and Relativism, by Todd Smith and Michael Karlberg, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 19 (2009). Epistemology has a perennial tension between two contrasting approaches to knowledge: the search for foundational truth vs. the relativity of truth. Consultation can help resolve paradoxical truth claims to develop an integrative approach to knowledge. [about]
  26. Auguste Forel: His Life and Enlightment, by Abdu'l-Missagh Ghadirian, in Bahá'í Studies, 1 (1976). Overview of Forel's life and his connections with the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  27. Bahá'í Faith and Marxism: Proceedings of a Conference held January 1986 (1987). [about]
  28. Bahá'í Writings, Philosophy and Environment, by Ian Kluge (2009). Philosophy is one of the most under-utilized resources in the quest for an improved psycho-spiritual environment and an improved relationship to the natural world. [about]
  29. Bahá'í Epistemology, by Peter Terry (2004). Statements of Abdu'l-Baha on the four modes of knowledge: sense perception, reason, tradition, and inspiration. All must defer to the divine standard. [about]
  30. Bahá'í Hermeneutics: An Academic and Primary Source Inquiry, by Peter Terry (2009). An exploration of the practice of scriptural interpretation by contrasting the "normative" approaches of the Central Figures with contemporary scholastic approaches by Juan Cole, Christopher Buck, Dann May, Michael Sours, Jack McLean, and Sen McGlinn. [about]
  31. Bahá'í Life and Existentialism, by Jack McLean (2008). The role of passion in the search for truth; existence and essence in living-in-the-world; epiphany and experiences of spiritual crisis; return to a belief in the soul; existentialism in sacred Bahá’í history; Bahá’u’lláh’s theology of the self. [about]
  32. Bahá'í Ontology, Part One: An Initial Reconnaissance, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  33. Bahá'í Ontology, Part Two: Further Explorations, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  34. Bahá'í Perspective on the Origin of Matter, A, by Keven Brown, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:3 (1990). The origin of matter is spiritual. Science sees that, at its most fundamental level, reality is not particular materials or structures, but probabilities and transformation. The four elements, three-fold structure of being, and balance are also examined. [about]
  35. Bahá'í Philosophy of Human Nature, The, by Ian Kluge, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 27:1-2 (2017). How the essential reality of the individual — the human soul and its powers of rational thought, willpower, memory, and reflection — translates these capacities into physical action through the intermediary of the brain. [about]
  36. Bahá'í Teachings on The Universe (2017). Compilation of writings related to the cosmos, the worlds of God, and spiritual evolution. [about]
  37. Bahá'í Writings and Kant's "Perpetual Peace", The, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Kant's Perpetual Peace: A Philosophical Sketch (1795) outlined practical steps necessary to end war through the establishment of a "league of peace" and a union of nations. This essay traces similarities between Kant's and Baha'i proposals. [about]
  38. Bahá'í Writings and the Buddhist Doctrine of Emptiness, The: An Initial Survey , by Ian Kluge (2013). Agreements and convergence of the Buddhist concept of sunyata with the Baha'i Writings. [about]
  39. Bahá'í Writings, The: A Meta-ethical Excursion, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). Philosophical examination of the Writings' ethical teachings, how they relate to the major ethical systems proposed in the past, and how they deal with some of the difficulties inherent in past systems. [about]
  40. Bahá'u'lláh's "Most Sublime Vision", by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
  41. Bahá'u'lláh's Lawh-i Haqqu'n-Nas: Tablet of the Right of the People, Provisional Translation, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). [about]
  42. Bahá'u'lláh's Seven Valleys and Developmental Psychology: Toward a Conception of Spiritual Development, by Andrew R. Hatala, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 21 (2011). Through the lens of the Seven Valleys, this paper creates a dialogue between theories of developmental psychology and Bahá’í philosophical perspectives, explores the evolution of the "self," and examines spiritual striving in human phylogeny and ontogeny. [about]
  43. Bahá'u'lláh and the Luminous Mind: Bahá'í Gloss on a Buddhist Puzzle, by Roland Faber, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Non-duality is of central importance to Buddhist thought and experience; on monism and non-dualism as reflected in Asian religious expressions, including Hinduism's Advaita Vedanta. [about]
  44. Balance hath been Appointed, The: Some Thoughts on the Publication of the Kitab-i-Aqdas, by Udo Schaefer, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 3:1 (1993). Significances of the Aqdas and the possible impact of its publication (1992) upon its Western audience. [about]
  45. Because Baha'u'llah said so: Dealing with a non-starter in moral reasoning, by Arash Abizadeh, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 5:1 (1995). Discusses a popular but misleading versus more philosophically responsible approaches to revelation. [about]
  46. Birth of the Human Being, The: Beyond Religious Traditionalism and Materialist Modernity, by Nader Saiedi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 21 (2011). We have arrived at a turning point in human evolution: the moment of the birth of the human being. This paper examines the development of this idea in the Writings of the Báb, Bahá’u’lláh, and ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, and its opposite concept, dehumanization. [about]
  47. Body, Mind, Soul and Spirit, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The Baha'i view of human nature involves an interaction between spirit, soul and body — these three elements exist both in the Semitic religions and in the Far Eastern ones; Western dualist and Eastern monist traditions are in fact all tripartite. [about]
  48. Brief Discussion of the Primal Will in the Bahá'í Writings, by Keven Brown, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 4:2 (1990). Neoplatonic concepts in Bahá'í metaphysics. [about]
  49. Brothers and Sisters: Buddhism in the Family of Chinese Religion, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The endurance of Confucianism for 2,000 years is partly because Buddhism and Taoism were content to play a subordinate role and not infringe upon the "Chinese Great Tradition"; implications of Buddhism's role in relation to new religions in China. [about]
  50. Buddhism and the Bahá'í Writings: An Ontological Rapprochement, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
  51. Call into Being: Introduction to a Bahá'í Existentialism, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
  52. Causality and Duality, by William S. Hatcher (2008). [about]
  53. Causality Principle in the World of Being, The, by William S. Hatcher (2008). [about]
  54. Celestial Burning, A: A Selective Study of the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Jack McLean (2012). Style, content, and context of World Order of Baha'u'llah and Dispensation of Baha'u'llah: part of chapter 1 of this lengthy analysis of the work of Shoghi Effendi (pages 1-71), offered as a sample. [about]
  55. Challenge: Helping Our Children Find Meaning and Purpose, by Harlan Carl Scheffler (2006). Part one of the book The Quest. [about]
  56. Chinese Religions: Evolution, Compatibility and Adaptability - A Historical Perspective, by Kow Mei Kao, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Case study of the history of Chinese civilization through the formation of the three major religions in imperial China: Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism; their compatibility, adaptability, and mutual influences in their early development. [about]
  57. Chronological Issues in the Lawh-i-Hikmat of Bahá'u'lláh, Some, by Peter Terry, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). [about]
  58. Commentary on the Islamic Tradition "I Was a Hidden Treasure...", by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 3:4 (1995). [about]
  59. Common Teachings from Chinese Culture and the Bahá'í Faith: From Material Civilization to Spiritual Civilization, by Albert Cheung, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An examination of the similarities in belief between the Baha'i Faith and traditional Chinese culture. [about]
  60. Communicative Interaction: Relating Habermasian Universalism to Baha'i Consultation, by Jonah Winters (1996). The philosophy of Jurgen Habermas has been influential in formulating definitions of morality. These theories are similar to the unique use by Baha'is of "consultation" as a tool for creating civil societies and nonrepressive moral codes. [about]
  61. Comparison of God and Soul Concepts from a Bahá'í and Hindu Point of View: Conceptions and Experiences of the Afterlife, by Diane Robinson Kerr (2014). Common ground between Hinduism’s Brahman and the Baha'i conception of God, and the complex understanding they propose of the soul and Atman. [about]
  62. Comparison of Islamic Religious Modes with the Four Valleys of Bahá'u'lláh, by Dianne Bradford (1998). Comparison of stages in The Four Valleys with three approaches from Islam: Theologians, Muslim Philosophers, and Mystics. [about]
  63. Compassion or Karuna as Understood in the Bahá'í Religion, by Ali K. Merchant, in Global Religious Vision, 2:1-2 (2001). A brief overview of the meaning of ethics and the divine origin of compassion. [about]
  64. Concept of Manifestation in the Bahá'í Writings, The, by Juan Cole, in Bahá'í Studies, 9 (1982). Lengthy overview of Baha'i theology and prophetology and their Islamic roots. [about]
  65. Concept of the Manifestation of God in Chinese Symbolism: An Inter-civilizational Hermeneutic Study, by Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). Seemingly incompatible symbols can point to a common underlying meaning, connecting worldviews and perspectives often considered incommensurable. There are elements of the Chinese tradition that resonate deeply with the Bahá’í concept of Manifestation. [about]
  66. Cosmogony and Cosmology, by Moojan Momen, in Encyclopaedia Iranica, Volume 6 (1993). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
  67. Democratic Elections without Campaigns? Normative Foundations of National Baha'i Elections, by Arash Abizadeh, in World Order, 37:1 (2005). Article on the philosophical foundations and core values of Baha’i elections, with particular attention to its relation to democratic theory. [about]
  68. Destiny and Freedom in the Bahá'í Writings, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 20:1-4 (2008). Baha'i writings on human free will and fate: our lives are free, yet also regulated by the decrees of God. Freedom is best enjoyed through understanding God's will, our spiritual purpose (H.M. Balyuzi Memorial Lecture). [about]
  69. Development of Metaphysics in Persia, The: A Contribution to the History of Muslim Philosophy, by Muhammad Iqbal (1908). Short philosophical observations on the theology of the Bab. [about]
  70. Development of Precast Exposed Aggregate Concrete Cladding, The: The Legacy of John J. Earley and the Implications for Preservation Philosophy, by Jenna Cellini (2008). Architectural use of concrete and different concrete types, with many references to the Baha'i temple in Wilmette. Link to thesis (offsite). [about]
  71. Dialogue Among Civilizations: Ancient and Future, Transitions and Potentials, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Many ideas in Chinese civilization resonate with Bahá'í thought. The I Ching highlights differences between western and eastern philosophy, the notion of embodiment in the Confucian view of the noble person, and transforming material to spiritual. [about]
  72. Dialogue between Yin-Yang Concepts and the Bahá'í Faith, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Yin-yang, a pivotal theory in Chinese thought influencing government, architecture, relationships, and ethics, has many similarities with the Bahá’í Faith, including the origin of matter, the nature of history, man-woman relationships, and health. [about]
  73. Discourse, Identity, and Global Citizenship, by Michael Karlberg, in Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 20:3 (2008). What does it mean to be a "global citizen"? From early Greek times, the concept of citizenship expanded from "inhabitant of a city" to a democratic ideal of self-determination. It now includes global relationships, interdependence, and altruism. [about]
  74. Discourses of Knowledge, by Frank Lewis, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought, ed. John Danesh, Seena Fazel (2004). Many statements in the Writings are couched in terms of a particular discourse, or intellectual tradition, for their immediate audience. Understanding context can help evaluate whether any given statement is meant as factual truth or as metaphor. [about]
  75. Do the Baha'i Writings on evolution allow for mutation of species within kingdoms but not across kingdoms?, by Bahman Nadimi. This paper explores the possibility that Baha'i writings on evolution allows for mutation of species within each of the kingdoms (such as vegetable or animal) but not across these kingdoms. [about]
  76. Effect of Philosophical and Linguistic Gender Biases on the Degradation of Women's Status in Religion, The, by Baharieh Rouhani Ma'ani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). [about]
  77. Elements of a Bahá'í-Inspired Natural Theology, by William S. Hatcher (2008). [about]
  78. Elements of Immortality: A Nexus of Proofs by 'Abdu'l-Bahá in Some Answered Questions, by James B. Thomas. This paper approaches the mystery of immortality in four steps that are based on objective reasoning by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá: the spirit of man; immortality of the spirit; proof with respect to progress after death; entrance into the Kingdom of God. [about]
  79. Emergence, Enchantment, Entanglement and Excellence of the Cosmos, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
  80. End of the World: Whatever Happened?, The: Or Leftover Time to Kill, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:3 (1991). [about]
  81. Epilogue on Neo-Darwinian Theory, by William S. Hatcher (2008). Contains no mention of Baha'i Faith. [about]
  82. Epistemological Implications of the Gradated Claims to Divine Authority in the Bahá'í Writings: Reflections on Infallibility, by William S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 17 (2007). There are different levels of infallibility, from the greater (the Manifestations who are "omniscient at will") to the lesser (like the Guardian, who has conferred freedom-from-error). [about]
  83. Epistemological Views of ‘Abdu'l-Baha, by Mikhael Sergeev (2009). A comprehensive reconstruction of Abdu’l-Bahá's epistemological views that are scattered throughout many of his writings and utterances. [about]
  84. Ernst Bloch's Philosophy of Hope and the Bahá'í Writings, by Ian Kluge, in Studies in Bahá'í Philosophy, ed. Mikhail Sergeev, vol. 1 (2012). This Marxist thinker, like the Baha'i perspective, adheres to an evolutionary worldview: reality is a teleological process in which all things strive to actualize their inherent potentials and complete themselves in their highest possible condition. [about]
  85. Essence of Man, The: Towards a Bahá'í Understanding of Human Nature and Psychology, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). Commentary on a section from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Mírzá Hádí, about "the essence of man." This paper attempts to provide an understanding of what is expressed in these Words and understand "Who is Man." [about]
  86. Eternal Quest for God: An Introduction to the Divine Philosophy of Abdu'l-Baha, by Julio Savi (1989). [about]
  87. Eternal Quest For God, The, by Julio Savi: Review, by William S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:2 (1992). [about]
  88. Evolution and Bahá'í Belief: 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Response to Nineteenth-Century Darwinism, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, Volume 12 (2001). Includes Eberhard von Kitzing's "Origin of Complex Order in Biology: `Abdu'l-Bahá's concept of the originality of species compared to concepts in modern biology." [about]
  89. Evolutionary Pathways in an Unfolding Universe, by Rafie Mavaddat (2009). History of events that have transformed primordial matter into present-day complex systems and the emergence of life, consciousness, and societies. Includes many passing mentions of the Faith, esp. pages 155-156. (Offsite.) [about]
  90. Examination of the Environmental Crisis, by Chris Jones Kavelin (2001). With a specific focus on the balance between the instrumental and intrinsic value of nature from a Baha'i perspective. [about]
  91. Excerpts from the Risáliy-i-Dhahabiyyih, by Báb, The (2001). On effulgences, essence, and unity of existence. [about]
  92. Firm Cord of Servitude, The, by Theo A. Cope, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  93. “First we speak of logical proofs': Discourse of knowledge in the Bahá'í writings, by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). [about]
  94. From The Editor's Desk: The Nature of Human Nature, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 27:1-2 (2017). Introduction to this issue's two articles: Ian Kluge's on human nature and Patricia McIlvride’s on mental disorders and depression, stigma, and the soul. [about]
  95. Further Comments on a Passage of the Lawh-i-Hikmat, by Amin E. Egea, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). A study of Pre-Islamic sources on the relation of Greek Philosophers and Jewish sages. [about]
  96. Future of Confucianism, The, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The history of Confucianism, its teachings, a critique of its place in the modern world, its future, and its survival into the 21st century. [about]
  97. Grand Narratives and the Bahá'í Writings, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Exploration of Baha'i teachings, inspired by the Guardian's call to "analyse the principles of the Faith and to correlate them with the modern aspects of philosophy and science," and on the thought of Oswald Spengler, Arnold Toynbee and Pitirim Sorokin. [about]
  98. Hermes Trismegistus and Apollonius of Tyana in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Keven Brown, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 8 (1997). History of alchemy, magic, and the hermetic arts, and their reflection in the later teachings of Baha'u'llah. [about]
  99. Hindu Concept of God, The: Unity in Diversity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The fundamental unity behind Hindu concepts of God and those found in the Semitic traditions, and the principle of unity in diversity, allow Hindu and Baha'i beliefs to come together and further their common goal of uniting the world's religions. [about]
  100. Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith, by Moojan Momen (1990). An attempt to explore the relationship between Hinduism and the Bahá'í Faith and to explain the Bahá'í Faith to those who are from a Hindu background. [about]
  101. History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, by John William Draper (1864). A selection of excerpts from the book. Contains no mention of the Baha'i Faith, but is of interest partly because Abdu'l-Baha referred to this book in Secret of Divine Civilization. [about]
  102. Human Intellect, The: A Bahá'í-Inspired Perspective, by Adrian John Davis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  103. Human Nature and Human Society: A Bahá'í Viewpoint, by William S. Hatcher, in The Bahá'í Faith and Marxism (1987). Introduction to the Bahá'í understanding of human beings and social structures. [about]
  104. Human Nature and Mental Health: A Bahá'í-Inspired Perspective, by Michael L. Penn, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:1-2 (2015). Overview of one research-practitioner’s understanding of the nature of mind from the perspective of the Bahá’í teachings, and implications of this view for understanding mental health and mental illness. [about]
  105. Human Station in the Bahá'í Faith: Selected Sections: Philosophy and Knowledge of the Divine, by Ali Murad Davudi (2013). A collection of talks by the Bahá’í teacher and philosopher Dr. A. M. Dávúdí on selected philosophical topics, including one on the subject of the non-political nature of the Bahá’í Faith and non-involvement in partisan politics. [about]
  106. I know Not How to Sing Thy Praise: Reflections on a Prayer of Bahá'u'llah, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Theology and the language of revelation vs. atheism and scientific discourse, and apophatic "not-knowing" vs. the impossibility of knowing god. [about]
  107. Identity, Discourse, and Policy: Reconstructing the Public Sphere, by Matthew Weinberg, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 21 (2011). Through interchange, individuals and their communities define their identities and goals. Life has a fundamentally dialogical character. Giving consideration to the multiple dimensions of human experience leads to new, greater social meanings. [about]
  108. Ideology, Ethics, and Philosophical Discourse in Eighteenth-Century Iran, by Juan Cole, in Iranian Studies, 22:1 (1989). Intellectual biography as a discipline assumes that the life and thought of an individual can shed light on an epoch. This paper examines 1700s Iran via the Shi'i scholar Mohammad Mehdi Niraq (d. 1794). No mention of the Babi or Baha'i Faiths. [about]
  109. Integrative Approach to Knowledge and Action: A Baha'i Perspective, by Behrooz Sabet, in Converging Realities, 1:1 (2000). A conceptual base for the development of an integrative approach to the study of the Baha'i Faith, based largely on the harmony of science and religion. [about]
  110. Introduction to Shi'i Islam, An: The History and Doctrines of Twelver Shi'ism, by Moojan Momen (1985). The most lengthy and authoritative contemporary overview of Shi'ism; a commonly-assigned college textbook. Includes biographies of prominent historical figures. Not yet formatted. [about]
  111. Introduction to Shi'i Islam, An, by Moojan Momen (1985). Summary of Shi'i history and doctrines, excerpted from the book Introduction to Shí'í Islam. [about]
  112. Introduction to the Doctrines of Soul and Enlightenment in Mahayana Buddhism and the Bahá'í Faith, An, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The development of Mahayana and how the Chinese people adopted and adapted it; non-self/enlightenment vs. the "True Poverty and Absolute Nothingness" of the Seven Valleys; sunyata/emptiness and Buddhist monism vs. the Valley of Unity's nonduality. [about]
  113. Introduction to the Lawh-i Haqqu'n-Nas, An, by Jean-Marc Lepain, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Summary of the tablet Lawh-i Haqqu’n-Nas, Tablet of the "Right of the People," on the metaphorical character of this world. [about]
  114. Islam and the Life of the Mind, by Todd Lawson (2005). History of Islamic philosophy and how it connects to individual Muslims. [about]
  115. Knowledge of God, The: An Essay on Bahá'í Epistemology, by Jack McLean, in World Order (1978). Knowledge of the divine is the beginning of all things. This can come through the investigative faculty, the path of reason, or through intuition and mysticism, the path of the heart. [about]
  116. La Raison dans les Ecrits baha'is: Son importance, sa fonction, son usage, by Ian Kluge (2013). French translation of "Reason and the Bahá'í Writings." [about]
  117. Language of the Heart, The: Parallels between Chinese and Bahá'í Approaches to the Spiritual Self, by Sim Tze Hong, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Parallels between Chinese and Confucian thought vs. Bahá'í teachings about the spiritual self, the nature of the heart, the pathway to perfection, the knowledge of oneself, and symbolism in language like "open heart" and "use heart." [about]
  118. Lawh-i-Hikmat: The Two Agents and the Two Patients, by Vahid Rafati, in Andalib, 5:19 (2002). Discussion of the two terms fa`ilayn (the active force / "the generating influence") and munfa`ilayn (its recipient / "such as receive its impact") in Islamic philosophy, and their later use in Shaykhi and Baha'i texts. [about]
  119. Lawh-i-Hikmat, Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of Wisdom: Towards a Progressive Bahá'í Theology, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  120. Letter to Frau Alice Schwarz-Solivo of a Talk by Abdu'l-Baha, by Josephina Fallscheer, in Der Sonner Der Wahrheit (1935). [about]
  121. Letter to Mrs. A. Schwarz, Stuttgart, by Josephina Fallscheer (1910). Philosophic conversations of the Master with a French consular official. The nineteenth letter from Dr. Fallscheer to Schwarz. [about]
  122. Letters Written on Behalf of the Guardian, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). Three questions: Letters Written on Behalf of Shoghi Effendi; Status of Research Department Memoranda; Bahá'í Writings Based in Fact? [about]
  123. Life and Times of August Forel, The, by Sheila Banani, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  124. Life as Metaphor, by John S. Hatcher, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). [about]
  125. Life, Death and Immortality: The Taoist Religion in Singapore and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Main features of Taoist practices in Singapore compared with Baha'i which, at first glance, could not be more disparate; whether unity may be found behind the apparent dichotomy; spanning the gulf between these two distinct religions from different times. [about]
  126. Logical Proof of the Existence of God, A, by William S. Hatcher (2003). [about]
  127. Love, Power, and Justice, by William S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:3 (1999). [about]
  128. Marxism Yesterday and Today, by Colin Leys, in The Baha'i Faith and Marxism (1987). [about]
  129. Medieval Islam: The Influence of Islam on Judaism and Christianity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Prior to the Renaissance, Islam inspired revivals in the cultural traditions of Christianity and Judaism, indicating a harmony between the three religions. The reforms inspired by Islam were a prelude to the modern scientific revolution. [about]
  130. Methods and qualities of the seekers of Reality in Some Answered Questions in the light of Bahá'í Scriptures, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). [about]
  131. Minimalism: A Bridge between Classical Philosophy and the Bahá'í Revelation, by William S. Hatcher (2004). [about]
  132. Minimalism, by William S. Hatcher (2008). [about]
  133. Minimalism from a Bahá'í Perspective, by Mahyad Zaerpoor Rahnamaie, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
  134. Miscellaneous philosophy topics, by John Walbridge, in Essays and Notes on Babi and Bahá'í History (2002). Islamic vs. Baha'i philosophy; Greek philosophers and the Jews; other topics of philosophy. [about]
  135. Models and Idols: Towards a Philosophy of the Community of Mind, by Shahbaz Fatheazam, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  136. Mystery of Divinity, The: A Comparison of Traditional Views of Divinity to Those in Some Answered Questions, by James B. Thomas, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). A new paradigm of spiritual evolution, and a possible platform for philosophical dissertation regarding religious influence on secular matters in the modern world. [about]
  137. Mysticism East and West, by Fargang Jahanpour, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
  138. Neo-platonic Framework for Bahá'í philosophy, by Theo A. Cope (1997). Some thoughts on the history and thought of Neoplatonism and its relation to Baha'i philosophy. Concludes with a review of another essay on Neoplatonism. [about]
  139. Neo-Platonism: Framework for a Bahá'í Ontology, by Mark A. Foster (1995). Ways to approach the language of philosophical symbolism in the Baha'i teachings. [about]
  140. Neoplatonism: Framework for a Bahá'í Metaphysics, by Nima Hazini (1995). [about]
  141. Neoplatonism and the Bahá'í Writings, Part 1, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). [about]
  142. Neoplatonism and the Bahá'í Writings, Part 2, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). [about]
  143. New Atheism, The: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2009). Logically and philosophically speaking, the works of the "new atheists" are deeply flawed and are often in disagreement with the Bahá’í Writings – though on a number of issues there are points of agreement. [about]
  144. New morality, The: An outline, by Udo Schaefer, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 5:1 (1995). Proposal that Bahá'u'lláh's ethical teachings rest on metaphysical premises about God and humankind, specifically the teleological and the deontological. [about]
  145. "Newly born babe of that Day", The: Mysticism in the Age of the Maturity of Humankind, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  146. Nietzsche and the Bahá'í Writings: A First Look, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 17 (2016). First version, missing footnotes. See update. [about]
  147. Nietzsche and the Bahá'í Writings: A First Look (reprint, with footnotes), by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Baha'i Writings and Nietzsche’s philosophy share a surprising number of features in common that allow us to re-vision Nietzsche from a new perspective. Both analyze reality in Aristotelian terms: actuality/potential; essence/attribute, matter/form, etc. [about]
  148. Nietzsche et les écrits bahá'ís: Une première approche, by Ian Kluge (2017). Translation of "Nietzsche and the Bahá'í Writings: A First Look." [about]
  149. On Existence and Qualities of the Human Soul, by Farjam Majd, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). On the existence, nature, and necessity of a human soul vs. the souls of animals. Is the concept of a soul needed to explain something, such as continuation of life after physical death? [about]
  150. Organic Order, An: An Approach to the Philosophy of Baha'u'llah through the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Roger Coe, in The Vision of Shoghi Effendi (1993). The structure of the Administrative Order as outlined by the writings of the Guardian, and the principles of the Anisa model of education. Available also as an audiobook. [about]
  151. Origin of the Bahá'í Principle of the Harmony between Science and Religion, The, by Keven Brown (2001). On the origin of the principle of scientific/religious harmony in Islamic and Bahá’í Writings, and discussion of a letter by Abdu'l-Bahá on the topic. [about]
  152. Origins of Creation, by Farjam Majd, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). Some classical proofs of the existence of God; the meaning of proof, types of proof, and conditions of the existence of a proof; and contemporary reasons why some people believe God is not needed to explain the universe. [about]
  153. Origins of the Bahá'í Concept of Unity and Causality: A Brief Survey of Greek, Neoplatonic, and Islamic Underpinnings, by Babak Rod Khadem, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  154. Permanence of Change, The: Contemporary Sociological and Bahá'í Perspectives, by Hoda Mahmoudi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 18 (2008). Sociohistorical changes of the Axial Age and the Renaissance, sociological views on modernity and its contemporary challenges, and key features of modernity as identified in the Bahá’í writings as "the universal awakening of historical consciousness." [about]
  155. Perspectives on the Inseparable Twin Duties Prescribed in the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, by Eamonn Moane, in Solas, 3 (2003). Religions differ in the balance of faith versus good works, the grace of God versus human strivings, and the scheme of salvation. To Baha'is, recognizing the Prophet and obedience to his laws are equal duties. For salvation, faith surpasses deeds. [about]
  156. Philosophical and Religious Contributions to the Emergence of Human Rights: The Bahá'í Perspective, by Dan Wheatley (2012). While some forms of religious extremism are contemptuous of human rights, and human rights are sometimes considered a contemporary secular religion, Baha'is believe that religious faith and human rights are more synergistic. [about]
  157. Philosophical Basis for the Centre for Renewable Energy at Dundalk Institute of Technology, A, by Lawrence D. Staudt, in Solas, 3 (2003). Nature of the physical world, the principle of sustainability, the present energy situation, options for Ireland, a vision for the use of renewable energy in Ireland, and the role of the Centre for Renewable Energy at Dundalk Institute of Tech (CREDIT). [about]
  158. Philosophy of Spirituality, The: A Bahá'í Viewpoint, by William S. Hatcher, in Dialogue and Universalism, vol. 11-12 (1996). [about]
  159. Pilgrim Notes, by Myron Henry Phelps (1917). Notes taken by Phelps during his second visit to Acca, 1917, from the words of Abdul-Baha. [about]
  160. Poetry About Philosophy: Section VIII: Poetry: Pioneering Over Four Epochs: Section VIII Poetry, by Ron Price, in Pioneering Over Four Epochs: An Autobiographical Study and a Study in Autobiography, Poetry: Section VIII (2005). The poetry in this section is concerned with various aspects of philosophy in the western tradition and Baha'i philosophy in particular. The concept of the manifestation of God is pivotal to Baha'i philosophy and to this poetry. [about]
  161. Possibilities of Existential Theism for Bahá'í Theology, The, by Jack McLean, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions vol. 8 (1997). The perspective of existential theology can benefit Bahá'í studies of religion, as applied to issues such as scholarship, spiritual transformation, and sacred history. [about]
  162. Postmodernism and the Bahá'í Writings, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
  163. Problems of Chronology in Baha'u'llah's Tablet of Wisdom, by Juan Cole, in World Order, 13:3 (1979). On the biographical section of the Lawh-i-Hikmat and its background in Islamic models. [about]
  164. Process Philosophy and the Bahá'í Writings: An Initial Exploration, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
  165. Procrustes' Bed: The Insufficiency of Secular Humanism, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). Secular humanism’s inability to accommodate the universal presence of religion in human nature undermines its claim to be a viable world-view for mankind and diminishes its internal coherence. [about]
  166. Prolegomena to a Bahá'í Theology, by Jack McLean, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:1 (1992). Groundbreaking and thorough essay on the basic concerns of scholarly Bahá'í theology. [about]
  167. Psychology of Spirituality, The: From Divided Self to Integrated Self, by Hossain Danesh (2000). Explores what is the nature of human reality, the purpose of human life, transcendence, and whether we have free will, using case histories, in-depth analysis, and practical examples. First 3 chapters only. [about]
  168. Purposes and Objectives of Bahá'í Scholarship, The: Compilation and commentary, by Peter Terry (2009). Three essays on objectives of Bahá'í Scholarship, attaining to the knowledge of God, and the study of philosophy. [about]
  169. Rationality in Academic Disciplines, by K. P. Mohanan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). For an academic community to construct knowledge through teamwork, its members must have a shared language with the same pairings of concepts and words, and they must have shared epistemic values by which to "dialogue" and base collective decisions. [about]
  170. Realms of Divine Existence as described in the Tablet of All Food, by Bijan Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 3.2.2 (1994). Bahá'í theoretical theology in the Lawh-i-Qullu'Ta'am. [about]
  171. Reason and the Bahá'í Writings: The Use and Misuse of Logic and Persuasion, by Ian Kluge (2001). How to study the Baha'i Writings through the use of logic. [about]
  172. Reason and the Bahá'í Writings, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). The Baha'i Faith has much to say on the importance of reason, logic, and a "rational God," but the mind alone is not sufficient to attain transrational understanding. This paper examines the uses and limitations of reason in light of cultural differences. [about]
  173. Reflection on the Theory of Alchemy as Explained in the Bahá'í Writings, A, by Keven Brown (2002). [about]
  174. Reflections on the Epistemological Views of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Mikhael Sergeev, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 22 (2012). Abdu’l-Bahá explored four sources of knowledge—sensory perception, reason, intuition, and tradition—to examine the importance of scripture, limitations of human knowledge, distinctions between objective and subjective knowledge, and between human/divine. [about]
  175. Relativism: A Basis For Bahá'í Metaphysics, by Moojan Momen, in Studies in Honor of the Late Husayn M. Balyuzi, Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 5, ed. Moojan Momen (1988). "Relativism" as a means of reconciling the often widely-divergent theologies of the world's religions. [about]
  176. Relativism and the Bahá'í Writings, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
  177. Religion in the Modem World, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). On aspects of the Western secular rebellion against theocracy and the rise of free enquiry and freedom of conscience through the lens of the European Reformation and Galileo’s conflict with the Papacy; religion's role in strengthening family unity. [about]
  178. Revelation, Interpretation, and Elucidation in the Baha'i Writings, by Robert Stockman, in Scripture and Revelation, ed. Moojan Momen (1997). [about]
  179. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 8 (1997). [about]
  180. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, by Jack McLean: Review, by Susan Maneck, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:2 (1999). [about]
  181. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, ed. Jack Mclean: Review, by David Piff, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  182. Rizal, Revelation and Revolution: Rizal's Letter to the Women of Malolos and Baha'u'llah's letter to Nabil Akbar Lawh-i-Hikmat (Tablet of Wisdom) , by Stephen Ramo (2011). Comparison of letter by Philippine national hero José Rizal to the women of Malolos with Bahá'u'lláh's "Tablet of Wisdom" to Nabil. [about]
  183. Sabaeans and African-based Religions in the Americas, The, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Overview of the religion of the Sabaeans [aka Sabeans], and some indigenous practices in the southern Americas such as Yoruba, Santeria, and Brazilian Candomble. [about]
  184. Saying Nothing about No-Thing: Apophatic Theology in the Classical World, by Jonah Winters (1994). The apophatic (negative) theology of the Neoplatonism of Plotinus and some pre-Pseudo-Dionysius eastern Christian thinkers. [about]
  185. Science and Religion in Chinese Culture, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Religion lies at the root of philosophy and civilization during the Tang (618-907) and Sung (960-1279) dynasties. Cultural achievements during these periods were influenced by Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism, but modern sciences did not develop. [about]
  186. Scientific Proof of the Existence of God, A, by William S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:4 (1993). [about]
  187. Seed of Creation: A philosophical approach towards the status of Universal House of Justice in respect to Baha'i concept of creation, by Ahmad Aniss (1998). A philosophical approach towards the status of Universal House of Justice in respect to Baha'i concept of creation. [about]
  188. Socrates, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
  189. Socrates in History and the Bahá'í Writings, by Universal House of Justice (1995). Historical facts known about Socrates, some of the difficulties inherent in endeavouring to unravel the historical Socrates, and quotations from the Baha'i Writings. [about]
  190. Socrates'/Plato's Use of Rhetoric: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Bret Breneman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:1 (1991). [about]
  191. Spiritual Foundations of Science, The, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). In contrast to modern western accounts of science, which reduce it to methods of logic and experiment, the Baha'i reference point is the spiritual nature of man. The experience of some outstanding scientists of the past supports the Baha'i view. [about]
  192. Spontaneous Talks by Dr. Khan, at His Sunday Morning Classes, Answering Some of His 95 Questions, by Ali-Kuli Khan (2013). Proofs of the Baha'i Faith, written by a prominent translator and companion of Abdu'l-Baha. Includes short biography of Khan regarding the history of this document, with photographs. [about]
  193. Sri Aurobindo Movement and the Bahá'í Faith, by Anil Sarwal (2001). Summary historical connections between the two communities. [about]
  194. Strategies and Processes of Social Change, by Howard Buchbinder, in The Baha'i Faith and Marxism (1987). [about]
  195. Stylistic Analysis of the Báb's Writings, A: Abridged Translation of Vahid Behmardi's Muqaddamih-yi dar bárih-yi sabk va siyáq-i áthár-i mubárakih-yi ḥaḍrat-i rabb a`lá, by Vahid Behmardi and William F. McCants, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). English translation by McCants of Behmardi's Persian article "Stylistic Analysis of the Báb’s Writings". [about]
  196. Suggestions for Bahá'í Hermeneutics, by Mark A. Foster (1999). Four essays: "Non-Overlapping Magisteria [science, religion, and Stephen Jay Gould]," "Infallibility: Sinlessness and Prophetic Ecology," "The Case of Some Answered Questions [pedagogy and evolution]," and "The Gospel According to Nabíl." [about]
  197. Symbolic Cosmology in the Sufi and Bahá'í traditions, by Michael McCarron (1997). Introduction to some meanings of the various realms of God. [about]
  198. Tablet of 'Abdu'l-Bahá Explaining Three Verses in the Lawh-i-Hikmat, A, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2005). Insights into three statement by Baha'u'llah on pre-existence, creation, and nature as the essence of God. [about]
  199. Tablet of All Food, The: The Hierarchy of the Spiritual Worlds and the Metaphoric Nature of Physical Reality, by Jean-Marc Lepain, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 16 (2010). [about]
  200. Tablet of the Manifestation, by Bahá'u'lláh (1998). [about]
  201. Tablet of the Uncompounded Reality: Translation, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). [about]
  202. Tablet of the Uncompounded Reality: Introduction, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). The conflict in Islam between philosopher-mystics who adhere to the philosophy of existential oneness (wahdat al-wujud) and those who oppose this view as heresy. [about]
  203. Tablet of Wisdom (Lawh-i-hikmat), by Juan Cole (1995). [about]
  204. Tablet of Wisdom (Lawh-i-Hikmat): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
  205. Tablet of Wisdom Questions and Answers, by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Ethel Jenner Rosenberg, the Life and Times of England's Outstanding Bahá'í Pioneer Worker, by Robert Weinberg (1995). Authorized translation of unpublished Tablet of 'Abdu'l-Bahá to Ethel Rosenberg in 1906 in reply to her questions about historical statements in the Lawh-i-Hikmat. [about]
  206. Tablet on the Right of the People, by Bahá'u'lláh (2016). On some situations relating to a person’s private rights, in this case theft and debt, with a larger meditation on the spiritual rights a person earns through righteous deeds, and God’s promise to reward good deeds and punish the wrong. [about]
  207. Tablet on the Struggle for Survival, by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Khitabát (1984). This Tablet illuminates a very important aspect of 'Abdu'l-Bahá's response to Darwinism, which is His teaching that "struggle for survival," far from being innate to human nature, is really an erroneous notion, or at least a notion characterizing human [about]
  208. Tablet to Auguste Forel, by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 15 (1968-1973) (1976). [about]
  209. Tafsir and the Meaning of the Qur'an: The Crucifixion in Muslim Thought, by Todd Lawson (2010). Using Qur'án 4:156-7 as an example, classical tafsīr, “scholastic" exegesis, has not always taken account of the way all Muslims understand the Quranic text. Other understandings may be found in poetry, philosophy, mysticism and even historical writing. [about]
  210. Theological Responses to Modernity in the Nineteenth-century Middle East, by Oliver Scharbrodt, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
  211. "These Four States Conferred Upon Thee": Tetrarchic Thinking in Philosophy, Theology, Psychology, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). We follow Bahá’u’lláh’s new principles and forget old patterns of thought in order to find peace, not only in the world, but also in our hearts. One new paradigm includes four-fold relationships, like Firstness/Lastness vs. Inwardness/Outwardness. [about]
  212. Towards a Definition of Bahá'í Theology and Mystical Philosophy, by Julio Savi, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 11 (2003). Baha'i theology is not metaphysical hair-splitting but is a "divine philosophy" all Baha'is are invited to study, to achieve inner knowledge, spiritual progress, and an enhanced capacity for loving. [about]
  213. Tractatus on Philosophy, by Jean-Marc Lepain (1998). An attempt to translate the teachings of Baha'u'llah in contemporary philosophic jargon, in poetic style. [about]
  214. True of Thyself: The Mystical Writings of Bahá'u'lláh and Ken Wilber's System of Integral Philosophy, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
  215. Understanding the Human Condition: Secular and Spiritual Perspectives, by Suresh Sahadevan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Both materialist and religious paradigms are important for happiness and for informing our decisions about how to live fruitful lives. Religion must work for the betterment of the world by applying spiritual concepts to solve contemporary problems. [about]
  216. Unity and Progressive Revelation: Comparing Bahá'í Principles with the Basic Concepts of Teilhard de Chardin, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
  217. William S. Hatcher 1935-2005 (2008). Bio and CV from the author's website. [about]
  218. Wondrous New Day, A: The Numerology of Creation and 'All Things' in the Badí' Calendar, by Robin Mihrshahi (2004). Symbolism in the Baha'i-era calendar, some Shaykhí origins of the Báb’s cosmology and ontology, and how these Shaykhí concepts find symbolic expression in the structure and organization of the Badí‘ calendar. [about]
  219. Word is the Master Key for the Whole World, The: The Bahá'í Revelation and the "Teaching and Spirit of the Cause" in Dialogical and Personal Thinking, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
  220. Yínyáng Cosmology and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). The yin-yang concept is pivotal to Chinese thought, culture, government, and ethics. It also bears many similarities with Baha'i philosophy and practice. [about]
  221. Zen Gloss on Baha'u'llah's Commentary on "He who knoweth his self knoweth his Lord", A, by Juan Cole (1996). A Buddhist interpretation of themes in Baha'u'llah's tablet on Islamic mysticism and a saying about knowing one's self. [about]
 
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