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Search for tag "Sufi"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1854 10 Apr - 1856 19 Mar Bahá'u'lláh in Sulaymaniyyih

Bahá'u'lláh suddenly leaves Baghdád and goes to Kurdistán. [BKG115; DB585; GPB120]

  • Before He left, Bahá'u'lláh asked His family to look after Mírzá Yahyá during His absence. [CB70–1; CH50–1]
Bahá'u'lláh lives for some time as a dervish in a cave on the mountain of Sar-Galú. He takes the name Darvísh Muhammad-i-Írání to conceal His true identity. [BBD214–15; BBRSM:60–1; BKG116–19; GPB120–1; TN38–9]

  • This action compares to Moses' going out to the desert of Sinai, to Buddha's retreat to the wilds of India, to Christ's walk in the wilderness and to Muhammad's withdrawal to the hills of Arabia. [BKG114]
  • Áqá Abu'l-Qásim-i-Hamadání was His only companion. Áqá Abu'l-Qásim was killed on a journey to collect money and provisions. [BKG116–17]
  • "It was this period of voluntary seclusion, following shortly after the execution of the Báb in 1850, which bequeathed to history irrevocable proof that Bahá'u'lláh and not His half-brother, Subhi-Ezel, was in reality the one celebrated by the Báb and for whom the Bábí Movement was the spiritual preparation. Tor by this act of voluntary retirement, Bahá'u'lláh gave Sebhi-Ezel unhampered opportunity to exercise the spiritual leadhership over the Bábís which the latter claimed as his right. The result, however, demonstrated Subhi-Ezel's utter incapacity to maintain unity among the Bábís, inspire them with faith and confidence sufficient to meet their many difficulties and guide them along lines of true future progress. Nother but the return of Bahá'u'lláh could re-quicken the flames of their ardour or supply them with the more universal principles of conduct and faith required to transform the Bábí Movement into a world religion." [BW2Surveyp33]
  • It was during this time that Bahá'u'lláh revealed the poem Qasídiyi-i-‘Izz-i-Varqá'íyyih (Ode of the Dove). It was composed of 2,000 couplets but Bahá'u'lláh allowed only 127 to be preserved. [BBD215; BKG118; GPB123]
  • See BKG114, GPB117–19 and K1250 for reasons for Bahá'u'lláh's retirement.
  • Before and during His absence no fewer than 25 people claimed to be the One promised by the Báb. [BBRSM29, 59; EB269; GPB125]
  • See BKG115–19 and GPB120 for Bahá'u'lláh's activities while in Kurdistán.
  • See KI248–51 for Bahá'u'lláh's own account of the episode.
  • See BKG119–22 and GPB124–6 for the condition of the Bábí community in Baghdád during this period.
  • The son born to Navváb shortly after the family's arrival in Baghdád became ill and died during Bahá'u'lláh's absence. [CB71; CH51–2]
  • See SBBR2:1–28 for Bahá'u'lláh's contact with Súfís.
  • BW16:528 for an account of Daoud Toeg, who visited the caves of Sar-Galú and photographed them.
Kurdistan; Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Life of; Dervishes; Sulaymaniyyih; Sar-Galu; Aqa Abul-Qasim-i-Hamadani; Poetry; Qasidiyyih-Varqaiyyih (Ode of the Dove); Navvab (Asiyih Khanum); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Sufism; Daoud Toeg; Caves; Interfaith dialogue; Bahaullah, Basic timeline; - Basic timeline, Expanded
1856 – 1863 It is in this period that Bahá'u'lláh reveals the Seven Valleys in response to a request from a Súfí, Shaykh Muhyi'd-Dín, the Qádí of Khániqayn, whom He may have met in Kurdistán. In it Bahá'u'lláh describes the stages of the mystical life. [BBD206 BBRSM:64; SA150]

  • For details of the composition and content of the Seven Valleys see SA1507.
Baghdad; Iraq; Kurdistan Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Life of; Haft Vadi (Seven Valleys); Sufism; Shaykh Muhyid-Din; - Basic timeline, Condensed; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Basic timeline
1864 Apr Sulaymán Páshá, a Súfí, succeeds Muhammad Pásháy-i-Qibrisí as Governor of Adrianople. Both are admirers of Bahá'u'lláh. [CH59, BBR487; BKG254] Edirne; Turkey Sulayman Pasha; Sufism; Muhammad Pashay-i-Qibrisi; Governors

from the main catalogue

  1. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Commentary on the Qur'ánic Verses Concerning the Overthrow of the Byzantines: The Stages of the Soul, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 2 (2001). [about]
  2. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Response to the Doctrine of the Unity of Existence, by Keven Brown, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 11:3-4 (2001). [about]
  3. Absolute Poverty and Utter Nothingness, by Rodney H. Clarken, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). Bahá’u’lláh’s ideas of poverty as detachment, and nothingness as selflessness. Cites some commonalities in concepts of detachment and nothingness from Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Muhammad and Socrates as five of the greatest philosophers or prophets. [about]
  4. Andalusí Theosophy: A Recontextualization, by Vahid Brown, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  5. Archeology of the Kingdom of God, The, by Jean-Marc Lepain (2015). Analysis of the spiritual worlds as depicted in philosophical and religious texts, from ancient the Greek to Jewish, Christian and Muslim thought, contrasted with the theosophy, metaphysics, anthropology, and hermeneutics of Baha'u'llah and 'Abdu'l-Baha. [about]
  6. "At Dawn the Friend came to my bed': An Early Fruit of the Supreme Pen, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A quasidih, a dialogue between the Beloved and the Poet as a lover. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
  7. Baha'u'llah's Notes to His "Ode of the Dove", by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
  8. Baha'u'llah's Seclusion in Kurdistan, by Bijan Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 1:1 (1993). Reconstruction of parts of this mostly undocumented period in Bahá'u'lláh's life. [about]
  9. Bahá'u'lláh and the Luminous Mind: Bahá'í Gloss on a Buddhist Puzzle, by Roland Faber, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Non-duality is of central importance to Buddhist thought and experience; on monism and non-dualism as reflected in Asian religious expressions, including Hinduism's Advaita Vedanta. [about]
  10. Commentary on a Verse of Rumi, by Juan Cole (1999). Summary and paraphrase of a tablet about a debate over the unity of being (wahdat al-wujud) in Sufi thought. [about]
  11. Commentary on the Islamic Tradition "I Was a Hidden Treasure...", by Abdu'l-Bahá, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 3:4 (1995). [about]
  12. Concept of Manifestation in the Bahá'í Writings, The, by Juan Cole, in Bahá'í Studies, 9 (1982). Lengthy overview of Baha'i theology and prophetology and their Islamic roots. [about]
  13. Concept of the "Perfect Man" (Pole) in Sufism and the Bahá'í Notion of the Manifestation of God, The, by Youli A. Ioannesyan, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  14. Death of Death, The: A Study of Self-Annihilation and Suicide in the Light of Sufi Thought and Bahá'u'lláh's Early Texts, by Bernardo Bortolin Kerr (2014). On theories of suicide in the field of conventional psychology and the writings of Baha'u'llah. [about]
  15. Dervish of Windsor Castle, The: The Life of Arminius Vambery, by Lory Alder and Richard Dalby (1979). Two-paragraph discussion of Curzon and the Babis. [about]
  16. Excerpts from the Risáliy-i-Dhahabiyyih, by Báb, The (2001). On effulgences, essence, and unity of existence. [about]
  17. Firm Cord of Servitude, The, by Theo A. Cope, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  18. From Iran East and West, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 2 (1984). [about]
  19. Hagiography: The Art of Setting Inspirational Examples for a Religious Community, by Iscander Micael Tinto, in Lights of Irfan, 17 (2016). The life of Jesus was the example against which saints were measured, and the lives of saints were the examples against which the general population measured itself. Comparison of Attar's "Muslim Saints and Mystics" with Abdu'l-Baha's "Memorials." [about]
  20. He who knoweth his self hath known his Lord: Commentary, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). Translation by Shoghi Effendi, completed by Cole. Themes include Islamic mysticism and the meaning of detachment, the meaning of the hadith about knowing one's self, the meaning of Return, and the hadith "The believer is alive in both worlds." [about]
  21. Human Intellect, The: A Bahá'í-Inspired Perspective, by Adrian John Davis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  22. Hymn to Love (Sáqí, bi-dih ábí), A, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A ghazal, a mystical song of love about The Beloved, meaning God or a Manifestation. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
  23. Inayat Khan's meeting with 'Abdu'l-Bahá in Paris, by Inayat Khan (1913). One-paragraph recounting of Khan, the founder of "Universal Sufism," meeting with Abdu'l-Baha in 1913. [about]
  24. Individualism and the Spiritual Path in Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa'i, by Juan Cole, in Occasional Papers in Shaykhi, Babi and Bahá'í Studies, 4 (1997). On Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa'i's criticisms of aspects of Sufism, and whether he could be considered a "mystic" despite his anathemas against Sufism. [about]
  25. Influence of Bábí Teachings on Ling Ming Tang and Nineteenth-century China, The, by Jianping Wang, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
  26. Introduction to Shi'i Islam, An: The History and Doctrines of Twelver Shi'ism, by Moojan Momen (1985). The most lengthy and authoritative contemporary overview of Shi'ism; a commonly-assigned college textbook. Includes biographies of prominent historical figures. Not yet formatted. [about]
  27. Introduction to Shi'i Islam, An, by Moojan Momen (1985). Summary of Shi'i history and doctrines, excerpted from the book Introduction to Shí'í Islam. [about]
  28. List of Baha'i Studies and Translations, by Stephen Lambden. A list of content available at Lambden's personal website, Hurqalya Publications, with select links to manuscripts, texts, introductions. Includes Shaykhi and Babi studies, bibliographies, genealogies, provisional translations. [about]
  29. Lover's Way, The: A Critical Comparison of the Nazm al-Sulúk by Ibn al-Fárid with the Qasídih-yi Varqá'iyyih by Bahá'ulláh, by Brian Miller (2000). Link to document offsite. [about]
  30. Martyrdom in Jihad, by Jonah Winters (1997). Unlike Judeo-Christianity, Islam does not contain a core of martyrdom. Rather, it occurs in three disparate areas: war/jihad, asceticism, and Shi'ism. I examine the relationship between jihad and martyrdom and their classical and contemporary meanings. [about]
  31. Mathnaviyí-i Mubárak, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  32. Mystic Journey of the Soul, The, by Gul Afroz Zaman, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). On the journey a soul must make to attain union with the Eternal from the confines of material life on earth; Christian and Sufi esoteric traditions vs. Baha'i mysticism; the central theme of attaining a "Heavenly Homeland" and closeness with the Creator. [about]
  33. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Baha'u'llah in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
  34. Mystical Aspects of the Baha'i Faith as presented in the Seven Valleys, by LeRoy Jones (1998). Mystical aspects of the Bahá'í Faith are of paramount importance and may sometimes get overlooked in favor of its social aspects. [about]
  35. Mystical content and symbology of Bahá'u'lláh's Four Valleys, by David Langness, in Seeker's Path (1997). Symbology of the Four Valleys, and a brief overview of a four-stage spiritual growth model. [about]
  36. Mysticism and the Bahá'í Community, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
  37. Mysticism and the Bahá'í Faith, by Farnaz Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 6:3 (1995). An examination of the Baha'i Faith's relation to mysticism and mystic themes and ideas present in the Baha'i Faith. [about]
  38. New Religious Movements, Tolkien, Marriage, by Universal House of Justice (1994). Various questions: new religious movements; Indian Letter of the Living; J.R.R. Tolkien; eternality of the marriage bond; illumination of Baha'u'llah's tablets. [about]
  39. Ode of the Dove, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
  40. Poetry as Revelation: Introduction to Bahá'u'lláh's 'Mathnavíy-i Mubárak', by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  41. Prolegomena to a Bahá'í Theology, by Jack McLean, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:1 (1992). Groundbreaking and thorough essay on the basic concerns of scholarly Bahá'í theology. [about]
  42. Psychology of Mysticism and its Relationship to the Bahá'í Faith, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 2:4 (1984). Contrast of theories of mysticism and its physiological components from the perspective of 20th-century psychology. [about]
  43. Realms of Divine Existence as described in the Tablet of All Food, by Bijan Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 3.2.2 (1994). Bahá'í theoretical theology in the Lawh-i-Qullu'Ta'am. [about]
  44. Reconciliation of Races and Religions, The, by Thomas Kelly Cheyne (1914). Early history of the Babi and Baha'i movements, life stories of their participants, and their contemporary religious context. [about]
  45. Relativism: A Basis For Bahá'í Metaphysics, by Moojan Momen, in Studies in Honor of the Late Husayn M. Balyuzi, Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 5, ed. Moojan Momen (1988). "Relativism" as a means of reconciling the often widely-divergent theologies of the world's religions. [about]
  46. Remembrance of God, The: An Invocation Technique in Sufism and the Writings of The Báb and Bahá'u'lláh, by Steven Scholl, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 2:3 (1983). Dhikru'lláh, the invocation or "remembrance" of God, is a Sufi technique of chanting or repeating prayers, divine names, or mantras to achieve heightened spiritual consciousness or a sense of mystical union. Includes commentary by Moojan Momen et al. [about]
  47. Rumi: Quotations from the Mathnáví of Rúmí in the Bahá'í Writings, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2001). Rúmí’s Mathnáví is quoted in many places in the Bahá'í Writings, as noted in the footnotes to the Writings. [about]
  48. Seven Cities in the Spiritual Journey to God: Gems of Divine Mystersies (Javáhiru'l-Asrár) and Seven Valleys, by Fadl Mazandarani, in Star of the West, 13:11 (1923). Address given to an American audience in 1923, probably translated by Mirza Ahmad Sohrab, who accompanied Fadl's second tour of the USA and Canada. [about]
  49. Seven Cities of Bahá'u'lláh, The (2002). This is a compilation of only those passages from Bahá'u'lláh’s Gems of Divine Mysteries that relate to the journey through "Seven Cities," which has similarities to Bahá'u'lláh’s Seven Valleys. [about]
  50. Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys, by Bahá'u'lláh (1991). [about]
  51. Seven Valleys of Bahá'u'lláh and Farid ud-Din Attar, by Sheila Banani, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An overview of the similarities between the Seven Valleys by Baha'u'llah and the Conference of the Birds by the Persian Sufi Farid ud-din Attar. [about]
  52. Short Poem by "Darvísh" Muhammad, Bahá'u'lláh: Sáqí az ghayb-i baqá burqa' bar afkan az 'idhár, A: An Introduction and Three Versions of Provisional English Translations, by Frank Lewis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  53. Structure of Existence in the Bab's Tafsir and the Perfect Man Motif, The, by Todd Lawson, in Studia Iranica: Cahiers 11: Recurrent Patterns in Iranian Religions from Mazdaism to Sufism (1992). The Perfect Man is the mediator between God and the World. He is the mirror in which creation sees God, the eye by which God sees creation. The Bab phrased his cosmology and his Quranic exegesis in light of wahdat al-wujud, the Unity of Being. [about]
  54. Sufi and Baha'i Spiritual Practices, by Michael McCarron (2009). Brief overview of some commonalities. [about]
  55. Symbolic Cosmology in the Sufi and Bahá'í traditions, by Michael McCarron (1997). Introduction to some meanings of the various realms of God. [about]
  56. Tablet of All Food and the Nature of Reality, The, by Karl Weaver (2016). Review of the Tablet's historical background, antecedents for specific phrases, English literary commentaries, its color system as related to Babi and Islamic traditions, the meaning of 'food,' and a different way of looking at the five levels of reality. [about]
  57. Tablet of All Food, The: The Hierarchy of the Spiritual Worlds and the Metaphoric Nature of Physical Reality, by Jean-Marc Lepain, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 16 (2010). [about]
  58. Tablet of the Sacred Night, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
  59. Tablet of the Uncompounded Reality: Translation, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). [about]
  60. Tablet of the Uncompounded Reality: Introduction, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). The conflict in Islam between philosopher-mystics who adhere to the philosophy of existential oneness (wahdat al-wujud) and those who oppose this view as heresy. [about]
  61. Tablet on Interpretation of Sacred Scripture (Ta'wíl), by Bahá'u'lláh, in Iqtidarat (n.d.). Tablet on "the legitimacy of figurative scripture interpretation." [about]
  62. Tablet on the Unity of Existence, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2001). [about]
  63. Themes of 'The Erotic' in Sufi Mysticism, by Jonah Winters, in Sutra Journal (2017). Mystical writing is replete with symbolism of love and eros, and it can also be found in the mystical poetry of Baha'u'llah. This paper provides background for that topic by surveying the use of themes of the erotic in writings by seven Sufi mystics. [about]
  64. "What I Want to Say is Wordless": Mystical Language, Revelation and Scholarship, by Ismael Velasco, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
  65. What is Baha'u'llah's Message to the Sufis?, by Roberta Law (1998). Nature of Sufism and Baha'u'llah's teachings for the Sufi community, especially as contained in the Seven Valleys. [about]
  66. Will, Knowledge, and Love as Explained in Baha'u'llah's Four Valleys, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:1 (1994). Exploration of some of the "seemingly abstruse" concepts of the Four Valleys. [about]
  67. World as Text, The: Cosmologies of Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa'i, by Juan Cole, in Studia Islamica, 80 (1994). [about]
  68. Zen Gloss on Baha'u'llah's Commentary on "He who knoweth his self knoweth his Lord", A, by Juan Cole (1996). A Buddhist interpretation of themes in Baha'u'llah's tablet on Islamic mysticism and a saying about knowing one's self. [about]
 
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