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Search for tag "Taoism"

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  1. Brothers and Sisters: Buddhism in the Family of Chinese Religion, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The endurance of Confucianism for 2,000 years is partly because Buddhism and Taoism were content to play a subordinate role and not infringe upon the "Chinese Great Tradition"; implications of Buddhism's role in relation to new religions in China. [about]
  2. Chinese Religions: Evolution, Compatibility and Adaptability - A Historical Perspective, by Kow Mei Kao, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Case study of the history of Chinese civilization through the formation of the three major religions in imperial China: Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism; their compatibility, adaptability, and mutual influences in their early development. [about]
  3. Common Teachings from Chinese Culture and the Bahá'í Faith: From Material Civilization to Spiritual Civilization, by Albert Cheung, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An examination of the similarities in belief between the Baha'i Faith and traditional Chinese culture. [about]
  4. Concept of the Manifestation of God in Chinese Symbolism: An Inter-civilizational Hermeneutic Study, by Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). Seemingly incompatible symbols can point to a common underlying meaning, connecting worldviews and perspectives often considered incommensurable. There are elements of the Chinese tradition that resonate deeply with the Bahá’í concept of Manifestation. [about]
  5. Dialogue between Yin-Yang Concepts and the Bahá'í Faith, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Yin-yang, a pivotal theory in Chinese thought influencing government, architecture, relationships, and ethics, has many similarities with the Bahá’í Faith, including the origin of matter, the nature of history, man-woman relationships, and health. [about]
  6. Life, Death and Immortality: The Taoist Religion in Singapore and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Main features of Taoist practices in Singapore compared with Baha'i which, at first glance, could not be more disparate; whether unity may be found behind the apparent dichotomy; spanning the gulf between these two distinct religions from different times. [about]
  7. Science and Religion in Chinese Culture, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Religion lies at the root of philosophy and civilization during the Tang (618-907) and Sung (960-1279) dynasties. Cultural achievements during these periods were influenced by Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism, but modern sciences did not develop. [about]
  8. Yínyáng Cosmology and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). The yin-yang concept is pivotal to Chinese thought, culture, government, and ethics. It also bears many similarities with Baha'i philosophy and practice. [about]
 
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