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Search for tag "vision"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1852 Oct Bahá'u'lláh has a vision of the Maiden, who announces to Him that He is the Manifestation of God for this Age. [BBD142–3, 212; BKG823 ESW11–12, 21 GPB101–2; KAN62]

  • This experience compares to the episode of Moses and the Burning Bush, Zoroaster and the Seven Visions, Buddha under the Bodhi tree, the descent of the Dove upon Jesus and the voice of Gabriel commanding Muhammad to ‘cry in the name of thy Lord'. [GPB93, 101]
  • The Báb repeatedly gave the year nine as the date of the appearance of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. The Declaration of the Báb took place in AH 1260; year nine was therefore AH 1269, which began in the middle of October when Bahá'u'lláh had been in prison for about two months. [CB46–7]
  • Subsequently in His Writings Bahá’u’lláh declared that He was the "Promised One" of all religions, fulfilling the messianic prophecies found in world religions. He stated that being several messiahs converging one person were the spiritual, rather than material, fulfilment of the messianic and eschatological prophecies found in the literature of the major religions. His eschatological claims constitute six distinctive messianic identifications: from Judaism, the incarnation of the "Everlasting Father" from the Yuletide prophecy of Isaiah 9:6, the "Lord of Hosts"; from Christianity, the "Spirit of Truth" or Comforter predicted by Jesus in His farewell discourse of John 14-17 and the return of Christ "in the glory of the Father"; from Zoroastrianism, the return of Shah Bahram Varjavand, a Zoroastrian messiah predicted in various late Pahlavi texts; from Shi'a Islam the return of the Third Imam, Imam Husayn; from Sunni Islam, the return of Jesus, Isa; and from the Bábí religion, He whom God shall make manifest.

    While Bahá’u’lláh did not explicitly state Himself to be either the Hindu or Buddhist messiah, He did so in principle through His writings. Later, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated that Bahá’u’lláh was the Kalki avatar, who in the classical Hindu Vaishnavas tradition, is the tenth and final avatar (great incarnation) of Vishnu who will come to end The Age of Darkness and Destruction. Bahá’ís also believe that Bahá’u’lláh is the fulfilment of the prophecy of appearance of the Maitreya Buddha, who is a future Buddha who will eventually appear on Earth, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure Dharma. Bahá’ís believe that the prophecy that Maitreya will usher in a new society of tolerance and love has been fulfilled by Bahá’u’lláh's teachings on world peace. [Bahaikipedia]

Tihran; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Visions; Maid of Heaven; Angels; Year nine; - Basic timeline; Interfaith dialogue
1873 1 Mar Bahá'u'lláh revealed the Tablet of the Vision, "Lawh-i-Rú'yá" in Arabic. See the Provisional Translation by Stephan Lambden. Akka Lawh-i-Ruya (Tablet of the Vision)
1939 12 Dec The Bahá’ís of Caracas, Venezuela, hold their first Nineteen Day Feast and afterwards elect a ‘Provisional Assembly’. Caracas; Venezuela Nineteen Day Feast; Provisional Assembly
1973 1 Apr The Bahá’ís of the Central African Republic broadcast the first of their weekly radio programmes on Radio Bangui. [BW16:141] Central African Republic Radio and television programmes; Media; Firsts, Other
1975 End of the year The Bahá’ís of the Central African Republic begin to televise regular semi-weekly programmes. [BW16:141] Central African Republic Radio and television programmes; Media
1976 Jan Bahá’ís in Jamaica initiate a weekly 15-minute radio programme. [BW16:186] Jamaica Radio and television programmes; Media
1977 The Hemispheric Bahá’í Radio and Television Conference is held in Panama, with 125 participants from 24 countries. [BW17:219] Panama Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Other; Bahai radio; Television; Media
1992 27 Jul The National Spiritual Assembly of Tonga broadcasts the first of its weekly 30-minute television programmes. [BINS281:5] Tonga Television programmes

from the main catalogue

  1. African religions; miracles; strange phenomena, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Five questions: the religion of Santeria; relationship to Sabaeanism; Yoruba-based new world religions; visions and miracles of the Virgin Mary and Fatima; UFOs, aliens, and genetic engineering. [about]
  2. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Baha (1990). [about]
  3. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2014). New 2014 translation (with a version side-by-side with the original). [about]
  4. Background and Centrality of Apophatic Theology in Bábí and Bahá'í Scripture, The, by Stephen Lambden, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions vol. 8 (1997). History of the theological position of the incomprehensibility-unknowability of God in past major Abrahamic religions and its importance and significance for contemporary Bahá'ís. [about]
  5. Baha'i Principle of Religious Unity and the Challenge of Radical Pluralism, by Dann J. May, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions (1993). A shorter version of this thesis is published in Revisioning the Sacred as "The Bahá'í Principle of Religious Unity: A Dynamic Perspectivism." [about]
  6. Division and Unity in the Baha'i Community: Towards a Definition of Fundamentalism, by Moojan Momen (2009). 15 criteria that define "fundamentalism," and their applicability and/or inapplicability to the Baha'i community; it may be more useful to use a psychological definition that sees the phenomenon as a value-free cognitive style, a way of perceiving. [about]
  7. Hermes Trismegistus and Apollonius of Tyana in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Keven Brown, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 8 (1997). History of alchemy, magic, and the hermetic arts, and their reflection in the later teachings of Baha'u'llah. [about]
  8. Interreligious Dialogue and the Bahá'í Faith: Some Preliminary Observations, by Seena Fazel, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions vol. 8 (1997). An overview of pluralistic approaches and their relevance to Bahá'í studies. [about]
  9. Possibilities of Existential Theism for Bahá'í Theology, The, by Jack McLean, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Baha'i Religions vol. 8 (1997). The perspective of existential theology can benefit Bahá'í studies of religion, as applied to issues such as scholarship, spiritual transformation, and sacred history. [about]
  10. Radio and Television in Teaching, The Use of, by Shoghi Effendi, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 2 (1991). [about]
  11. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 8 (1997). [about]
  12. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, by Jack McLean: Review, by Susan Maneck, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:2 (1999). [about]
  13. Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, ed. Jack Mclean: Review, by David Piff, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
  14. Spiritual Foundations of Science, The, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). In contrast to modern western accounts of science, which reduce it to methods of logic and experiment, the Baha'i reference point is the spiritual nature of man. The experience of some outstanding scientists of the past supports the Baha'i view. [about]
  15. Symbol and Secret and Revisioning the Sacred: Reviews, by Jonah Winters, in Iranian Studies, 32:1 (1999). [about]
  16. Tablet of the Vision, by Bahá'u'lláh (1999). [about]
  17. Tablet of Vision, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
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