Drawing a picture of God?

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Chris
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Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 7:36 pm
Location: montreal

Drawing a picture of God?

Postby Chris » Mon Feb 09, 2004 8:10 pm

A child asked me the other day if we were allowed to draw what we thought God looked like (not for anything official, just for artistic expression). Does anyone know if there is something in the writings on this subject?
I thought it was an interesting question.


Chris.[/u]
smile, it makes you feel happy!!

Guest

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 10, 2004 6:04 pm

A pilgrims note of Abdul'Baha says "When this light shines through the mind of a musician, it manifests itself in beautiful harmonies. Again, shining through the mind of a poet, it is seen in fine poetry and poetic prose. When the Light of the Son of Truth inspires the mind of a painter, he produces marvellous pictures." (Bloomfield, The Chosen Highway, p. 167.)


I think let the child draw... :P

brettz9
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Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2003 12:12 pm
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Postby brettz9 » Wed Feb 11, 2004 12:51 am

Dear Chris,

I think that since we are urged to abandon thoughts of ever attaining to conceiving the Unknowable or His Attributes, and are even not to attempt to depict the Holy Manifestations of God, Who represent the Godhead on this physical plane, I believe it is in the spirit of the Writings that we steer clear of allowing any conceptions to crystallize.

For artist purposes, however, we are told "We see no objection to the use of natural phenomena as symbols to illustrate the significance of the three Central Figures, Bahá'í Laws, and Bahá' í Administration, and we also appreciate the suitability of using visual symbols to express abstract concepts." (see Compilation on the Arts, part four, no. 68). See the same site, however, (excerpts 69 and 70) for an apparent indication that symbolic representations are not to be portrayed as actually depicting the Figure (i.e., it should be clear that it is symbolic).

In another context, for those who have difficulty praying without some conception in mind, our Writings indicate that one can at first visualize the Shrine of Bahá'u'lláh or a picture of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, but that the goal is to move away from any such dependencies since God is above any conception (more using His prayers and Writings as a tool for contemplation of developing intangible virtues within and seeing them manifest around us in nature and others).

best wishes,
Brett


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