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Search for location "Syria"

  1. from the Chronology
  2. from the Chronology Canada
  3. from the Main Catalogue
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from the Chronology

date event locations tags see also
1867 Sep - Aug 1868 In this period the extent of the Faith was enlarged with expansion in the Caucasus, the establishment of the first Egyptian centre and the establishment of the Faith in Syria. [GPB176]
  • While Nabil was in Khorasan in spring 1866, at his suggestion, the greeting Alláh-u-Abhá (God is the most Glorious) was adopted by the followers of Bahá'u'lláh, replacing the old salutation of Allāho Akbar (God is the Greatest), which was common among the Bábis. This was a significant action that gave group identity to the Bahá'ís and was a sign of their independence from the Bábís and the Azális, a Bábí faction that considered Mírzá Yaḥyā Ṣobḥ-e Azál as the legitimate successor to the Báb. The greeting Alláh-u-Abhá superseded the Islamic salutation and was simultaneously adopted in Persia and Adrianople. [BKG250; GPB176, “Nabil-e aʿzam Zaranadi, Mollā Mohammad,” by Vahid Rafati, Encyclopædia Iranica,]
  • The phrase ‘the people of the Bayán', which now denotes the followers of Mírzá Yahyá, was discarded and is replaced by the term ‘the people of Bahá'. [BKG250; GBP176]
  • Caucasus; Egypt; Syria; Khurasan; Iran; Edirne (Adrianople); Turkey Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Nabil-i-Azam; People of the Bayan; People of Baha; Allah-u-Abha; Greatest Name; Most Great Separation
    1910. (In the year) The publication of Fifty-Three Years in Syria by Reverend H. H. Jessup. (Apologies: this link does not have the same text as found on SBBR1p78) [Collins10.818]
  • This same Reverend Jessup who delivered the address to the World Parliament of Religions in 1894 in Chicago seemed to have revised his opinion about the Faith. Perhaps this was due to the dis-information being spread by the Covenant-breakers after the passing of Bahá'u'lláh.
  • He also published Babism and the Babites in "The Missionary Review of the World", Princeton, NJ Oct 1902 p771-775 and The Babites in "The Outlook", London, 22 June 1901 p451-456. [Collins11.574, 11.575]
  • See also WOB83 for other missionaries who wrote polemics against the Bahá'í Faith.
  • United States; Syria Criticism and apologetics; Henry Jessup; Christian missionaries
    1916. 6 May In response to the perceived threat from within the Ottoman Empire, the authorities took harsh measures against leading nationalist persons, intellectuals and activists. On this day, 21 were publicly hanged in Beirut and 10 in Damascus on the order of Jamal Pasha, the commander in chief of the Turkish forces in Greater Syria, (Present-day Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Palestine).

    These individuals were accused of collaborating with the British and the French and were seen as leaders of the Arab nationalist movement. The day has become to be known as "Syrian Martyrs Day". [Wikipedia; Colonialism, Nationalism and Jewish Immigration to Palestine: Abdu´l-Baha’s Viewpoints Regarding the Middle East by Kamran Ekbal p21]

    Damascus; Syria; Beirut; Lebanon
    1923. 18 Oc The Nairn Transport Company was a pioneering motor transport company that operated a trans-desert route from Beirut, Haifa and Damascus to Baghdad, and back again, from 1923. Their route became known as "The Nairn Way". The firm continued, in various guises, until 1959. [Wikipedia]
  • Lorol Schopflocher used this service for her trip from Baghdad to Beirut after one of her visits to King Faisal in Baghdad.
  • Beirut; Lebanon; Haifa; Israel; Damascus; Syria; Baghdad; Iraq
    1975 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Jordan was formed with its seat in Amman. From 1970 it was a part of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Near East with its seat in Lebanon and jurisdiction over Lebanon, Jordon and Syria. This left the National Spiritual Assembly of Lebanon with its seat in Beirut and jurisdiction over Syria. [BW16:264]
  • For picture see BW16:452.
  • Amman; Jordan; Lebanon; Syria National Spiritual Assembly, formation
    2004 19 Apr The passing of Mr Aziz Ismayn Yazdi (b. Alexandria, Egypt in 1909) in Vancouver, Canada at the age of 94. Aziz Yazdi lived in Egypt, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Great Britain, Uganda, Kenya, Israel, and finally Canada. In 1968 he was appointed to the Continental Board of Counsellors in Central and East Africa and was an inaugural member of the International Teaching Centre in Haifa. [BWNS297, BW'03-‘04pg239] Vancouver; Canada; Egypt; Syria; Iran; Iraq; United Kingdom; Uganda; Kenya; Israel Aziz Ismayn Yazdi; Counsellors; International Teaching Centre, Members of; In memoriam; Births and deaths; BWNS
    2015. 1 Oct 2015 saw an unprecedented number of refugees to Europe fleeing the conflict in the Middle East, particularly from Syria. In response for their request for guildance, the Universal House of Justice in its message to the National Spiritual Assemblies, defined the principles to assist the Bahá'í communities through the social changes that must need follow such a migration. It stated that the Bahá'í community had insufficient resources at this stage of development for a response at the institutional level however the situation presented an opportunity for some individual believers to become involved to lend humanitarian assistance. Europe; Syria The Universal House of Justice; Refugees

    from the Chronology Canada

    date event locations tags see also
    2004 19 Apr The passing of Mr Aziz Ismayn Yazdi (b. Alexandria, Egypt in 1909) in Vancouver, Canada at the age of 94. Aziz Yazdi lived in Egypt, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Great Britain, Uganda, Kenya, Israel, and finally Canada. In 1968 he was appointed to the Continental Board of Counsellors in Central and East Africa and was an inaugural member of the International Teaching Centre in Haifa. [BWNS297, BW'03-‘04pg239] Vancouver, BC; Egypt; Syria; Iran; Iraq; United Kingdom; Uganda; Kenya; Israel Aziz Ismayn Yazdi; Counsellors; International Teaching Centre, Members of; In memoriam

    from the Main Catalogue

    1. Divide and Rule: The Creation of the Alawi State after World War I, by Necati Alkan, in Fikrun wa Fann ("Art and Thought") (2013-11). Summary of 20th-century history of the Nusayri/Alawi Shi'i movement in Syria and Turkey. (No mention of Bahá'ís.) [about]
    2. Fighting for the Nuṣayrī Soul: State, Protestant Missionaries and the ʿAlawīs in the Late Ottoman Empire, by Necati Alkan, in Die Welt des Islams, 52 (2012). Overview of the Alawites/Nusayris (Syrian Shi'is) in the start of the 19th century, political attitudes in Syria and Istanbul, and the influence of Protestant missionaries. [about]
    3. Migrants and Refugees in Europe, by Universal House of Justice (2015-10-01). Principles to guide the response of the Bahá’í community to the dramatic social changes concerning the 2015 influx into Europe of people fleeing conflict in the Middle East, especially Syria. [about]
    4. Rashid Rida on the Bahá'í Faith: A Utilitarian Theory of the Spread of Religions, by Juan Cole, in Arab Studies Quarterly, 5:3 (1983 Summer). Rida developed a theory of missionary work characterized by both modern pragmatic and traditionalist Islamic aspects: a sociology of the spread of religion in terms of organizational efficiency avoids talk of intrinsic "truth" or supernatural agency. [about]
    5. Religions of Modern Syria and Palestine, The, by Frederick Jones Bliss (1912). [about]
    6. Sapiential Theosis: A New Reading of Ephrem the Syrian's Hymns on Paradise, by Christopher Buck, in Journal of the Assyrian Academic Society, 9.2 (1995). Prepublication chapter from Paradise and Paradigm: Key Symbols in Persian Christianity and the Baha’i Faith (Albany: SUNY Press, 1999). St. Eprem the Syrian is generally regarded as the greatest Christian poet of Late Antiquity. [about]
    7. Syrian Prophet(s), The, by Enoch Tanyi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:3 (1991). The Qur'án says there were previous Messengers of God whose names have not been mentioned. Where do they fit into the chronology and timeline of the known Prophets? What could their nationalities have been? [about]
    8. Treasures of the East: The Life of Nine Oriental Countries, by Zia M. Bagdadi (1930). Descriptions of nine "Treasures" — Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Iraq, Jijaz (Arabia), Transjordania (Arabia), Persia, India, and Turkey — by an Iraqi physician who traveled to the U.S. and was instrumental in the establishment of several Bahá'í communities. [about]
     
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