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Search for tag "Conflict"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1961 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Honduras was formed. [BW13:258; National website; Bahaipedia Honduras; BN No364 July 1961 p3]
  • For picture see BW13:265.
  • Honduras National Spiritual Assembly, formation; Conflict
    1994. 24 Oct The Supreme Court of India, in judgment to settle a religious dispute between Hindus and Muslims, cited the Bahá’í Faith as an example and the Teachings of the Faith as guidelines for resolving such disputes. [BW94-95p130-131; One Country]

    Background: On the 6th of December, 1992, the Babri mosque in the northern town of Ayodhya was razed by a group of Hindus because the mosque, built in 1528, had been erected on the spot where the Hindu deity Rama is said to have been born thousands of years earlier. The destruction enraged Muslims and ignited a grave crisis in India. Muslim and Hindu mobs attacked each other's houses of worship, homes and people in a number of cities, resulting in the death of hundreds and the destruction of property not only in India but in Pakistan, Bangladesh, and even in Britain. [Mess86-01p440]

      The Bahá'í community had issued a statement in English that highlighted a central theme: “Communal Harmony—India’s Greatest Challenge.” The issue of religious conflict and the importance of harmony and peacebuilding were emphasized. This statement was later translated into most of the official languages of India and distributed to Ministers, bureaucrats, district county workers, the superintendent of police, NGOS, and faith communities.

    The judges, in their ruling, quoted from the statement from the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of India Communal Harmony: India's Greatest Challenge. [Mess86-01p441]

  • A timeline for the case.
  • New Delhi; India; Ayodhya Communal harmony; Communalism; Ethnic divisions; Conflict resolution; Statements; National Spiritual Assembly, statements; Public discourse

    from the main catalogue

    1. Achieving Reconciliation in a Conflicting World, by Ismael Velasco, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 18:1-4 (2008). The dynamics of conflict against the backdrop of globalization, and religion's role in fostering unity. A "logic of reconciliation" will allow us to find harmony among ideas, individuals, and communities. [about]
    2. Applications of Positive Psychotherapy for Marriage and Family Therapy, by Nossrat Peseschkian, in Bahá'í Studies Notebook, 3:1-2 (1983). To understand observed behaviour, we need to consider transcultural conditions as well as those in the personal history of the patient. This approach underlies the author's concept for a conflict-centred therapy. [about]
    3. Being and Becoming: A Photographic Inquiry with Bahá'í Men into Cultures of Peace, by Chuck Egerton (2020). How Bahá’í men experience and perform their masculinities as told through their stories and photographs; the theories of Bourdieu's habitus, the mirror of visual introspection through photography, and indigenous "Sacred Relationship"; conflict resolution. [about]
    4. CommonVisions: Photography and Conflict Transformation, by Chuck Egerton, in Global Journal of Peace Research and Praxis, 1:1 (2015). How an arts-based photography project, built on the concept of the oneness of humanity, was used to overcome racism using the universal language of photography and a medical model to bring unity and resolve conflict. [about]
    5. Communal Harmony: India's Greatest Challenge, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of India (1993(?)/2015). A formal statement from the NSA of the Bahá'ís of India on the need to overcome religious, linguistic and caste-based tensions. [about]
    6. Constructive Resilience, by Firaydoun Javaheri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:4 (2018). How the perseverance of the Bahá'ís in Iran has resulted in the generality of the Iranian people beginning to admire and, in some cases, arising to assist the Bahá'ís. [about]
    7. Contemporary Governance and Conflict Resolution: A Bahá'í Reading, by Graham Hassall (1999). The Bahá'í Writings provide the foundations for a "critique of modernity" at the same time that they suggest possible paths to the future, in particular in conflict resolution. [about]
    8. Deganawida, the Peacemaker, by Christopher Buck, in American Writers: A Collection of Literary Biographies, 26 (2015). Biography of the Iroquois / Haudenosaunee prophet-like figure who lived around 600 or 900 years ago. [about]
    9. Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Nine Year Plan, by Universal House of Justice (2022-11-01). Matters relating to the Nine Year Plan (2022-2031), ethnic and cultural diversity, the human family's crisis of identity, prejudice, Africa, and economic injustice. [about]
    10. Discussion with Farida Vahedi, Executive Director of the Department of External Affairs, National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of India, A, by Michael Bodakowski and Katherine Marshall (2011-03-02). Overview of Vahedi's life and work, history of the Faith in India and development projects, the Institute for Studies in Global Prosperity, and issues regarding migration and protection of women and girls. [about]
    11. Family and the Future, The: Legal Perspectives, by P. E. Ringwood, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). Legal action and institutions must be developed which are positive, constructive and linked with community education and resources to improve the quality of family life; we must not forget that all life has a spiritual perspective. [about]
    12. Governance and the Governed: Leadership, Conflict, Resilience, Resolution, and Hope, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:4 (2018). "From the Editor's Desk": If the purpose of governance and leadership is to respond to the needs of the governed, then what attributes and methodologies should characterize the process of those in positions of authority? [about]
    13. Hope and Resilience: The Application of Spiritual Principles to Community Life, by Institute for Studies in Global Prosperity (2021). On how communities use concepts and principles such as the oneness of humankind and interconnectedness with nature in their efforts to contribute towards the common good; on strong networks of social support and the management of water-related challenges. [about]
    14. Humanitarian Responses to Global Conflicts, by Universal House of Justice (2015-01-13). A letter to and response from the House about why Bahá'ís do not condemn the 2014 attacks on Gaza, and principles to consider when addressing conflicts. [about]
    15. Mediation, Transformation and Consultation: A Comparative Analysis of Conflict Resolution Models, by Guy Sinclair, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). The Bahá'í principle of consultation as a framework for mediation, transformation, and the process of conflict resolution. The need for dialogue between all those concerned with such goals. [about]
    16. Power of Reflection, The: Advancing Governance and Dispute Resolution Systems through Devolved Reflection and Shared Knowledge Generation, by Shahla Ali, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:4 (2018). Reflection is the "source of crafts, sciences and arts," with the capacity to produce "pearls of wisdom and utterance as will promote the well-being and harmony of all the kindreds of the earth." It can improve institutions and community governance. [about]
    17. Problem Solving in the Family, by Erik Blumenthal, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). How can we solve our problems or conflicts? We need to know and put 5 factors into practice: our attitude; mutual respect; understanding each other's motives; changing the 'present agreement' by conscious communication; and mutual cooperation. [about]
    18. Protecting the Human Family: Humanitarian Intervention, International Law, and Bahá'í Principles, by Brian D. Lepard, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 13:1-4 (2003). The moral and legal problems raised by the use of military force to aid human rights victims. Relevant Bahá’í ethical principles and how these might assist us to reform existing international law to better protect all members of the human family. [about]
    19. Same Yet Different, The: Bahá'í Perspectives on Achieving Unity out of Difference, by Deborah Clark Vance (2002-05). Based on in-depth interviews with members of the Bahá’í Faith [in the USA] to uncover a description of how they believe they can bring together diverse people; development of a linear model of multicultural communication. [about]
    20. Same Yet Different, The: Creating Unity Among the Diverse Members of the Bahá'í Faith, by Deborah Clark Vance, in Journal of Intergroup Relations (a publication of the National Association of Human Rights Workers), Volume 29:4 (2002/2003 Winter). A study of the process by which people form a unified community from diverse cultures based on interviews with a small group of American Bahá’ís; the importance of foundational beliefs in this process; learning intercultural communication. [about]
    21. Special Report on Baha'i Burial vs. Maori Custom, by National Spiritual Assembly of New Zealand (1989-10-06). Special report about reconciling Bahá'í burial laws with local maori customs where they conflict; includes guidance from the Universal House of Justice. [about]
    22. Vision of Race Unity: America's Most Challenging Issue, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States (1991). A formal statement from the US NSA on "the most challenging issue confronting America." [about]
     
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