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Search for tag "Dorothy Chivunda"

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from the chronology

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1956 (Early) In early 1956, Rudolfo Duna, his wife Angelica, and eleven year old daughter Julia, early Mozambican Bahá'ís, undertook the arduous train journey from Johannesburg, South Africa to Luanda, Angola, covering over 5,000 kilometers. Within a week after their arrival in Luanda, a community large enough to establish a Local Spiritual Assembly was formed.

Another example of a new African believer arising was the case of Dorothy Chivunda in Zambia. When word of the Faith reached the church Dorothy attended, it aroused the curiosity of the congregation. The church decided to send Dorothy to investigate the claims of this new religion. Within three weeks, she declared as a Bahá'í, promptly organizing a teaching trip to her native village in Kawiku, in Chibwakata area of North Western Province. This trip, and the others that followed, involved over 300 kilometers of travel over rough terrain. It set in motion a process that would lead to the enrolment of thousands of her fellow tribesmen, the Lunda of Zambia, into the Faith.

[A Brief Account of the Progress of the Bahá'í Faith in Africa Since 1953 by Nancy Oloro-Robarts and Selam Ahderom p3]

Luanda; Angola; Pioneering; Rudolfo Duna; Angelica Duna; Julia Duna; Dorothy Chivunda

from the chronology of Canada

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