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Search for tag "Drama"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1903 May Russian poet Isabella Grinevskaya wrote the play "Báb" which was performed in St. Petersburg in 1904 and again in 1914 and once again in 1917. It was translated into French and Tatar (and later into German by Friedrich Fiedler) and lauded by Leo Tolstoy and other reviewers at the time. It is reported to have been Tolstoy's first knowledge of the Faith.
  • In 1910-11 she spent two weeks in Ramleh as a guest of `Abdu'l-Bahá and after she returned to Russia she had several letters and Tablets from Him.
  • Immediately upon her return from Egypt in January of 1911 she began work on the book "A Journey in the Countries of the Sun", an account of her visit with 'Abdu'l-Bahá. This work was not completed until 1914 because in the summer of 1912 she made a trip to Paris to work with the French translator of "Báb", Madame Halperin, and when she returned to Leningrad she began work on the drama entitled Bahá'u'lláh. It was published in Leningrad in 1912 but was never performed. "Journey", a book of some 550 pages did not get published because of the disruption cause by the advent of the war. See BW6p707-712 for the article "Russia's Cultural Contribution to the Bahá'i Faith" by Martha Root.
  • For a photo see BW6p709 or here.
  • Also see Notes on the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions in Russia and its territories by Graham Hassall.
  • Isabella Grinevskaya (the pen name of Beyle (Berta) Friedberg), born in Grodno in 1964, died in Istanbul in 1944. [Revolvy] In His message to Isabella Grinevskaya, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá praised her efforts to stage theatrical performances about the Báb and Bahá’u’lláh but cautioned her that people’s attention at that moment was focused on “war and revolution.” However, He added, “the time for staging it will come” and it will “have a considerable impact” in Europe.

    Ms. Grinevskaya’s play about the Báb was first staged in St. Petersburg in January 1904. Mr. Tolstoy read the play and wrote Ms. Grinevskaya to praise her and share his sympathy with the Baha'í teachings, according to an article by Martha Root in the 1934-1936 edition of The Bahá'í World.

  • St Petersburg; Ramleh (Alexandria); Alexandria; Egypt; Istanbul (Constantinople); Turkey; Grodno; Russia Isabella Grinevskaya; Leo Tolstoy; Publications; Drama; Plays; Arts
    1910 (In the year) The publication of God’s Heroes: A Drama in Five Acts by Laura Clifford Barney, (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1910). The play, based on the life of the Báb, centred on Táhirih. London Laura Clifford Barney; Plays; Drama; Tahirih; Bab, Life of
    1911 9 Sep ‘Abdu’l-Bahá visited the home of Mrs Thornburgh-Cropper at 31 Evelyn Mansions, Carlisle Place, Victoria.
  • In the afternoon ‘Abdu’l-Bahá visited the home of Miss Anett Schepel and Miss Alice Buckton, Vanners, Byfleet, Surrey (since demolished), some 20 miles out of London. He spoke with a number of working women from the Passmore Edwards' Settlement who were visiting while on holidays. (The Passmore Edwards' Settlement began in 1890 as one of the first “settlements” run by socially-conscious middle-class educators for the benefit of local working people and their children.) The talk has been entitled, "The small house and the path to true happiness". ['Abdu'l-Bahá Speaks, SYH39]
  • Alice Mary Buckton (1867-1944) wrote many plays and poems. Her play Eager Heart was seen by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá on His second visit to England. She became a member of the Froebelian Society which was formed to reform educational methods. She persuaded Anett Schepel who had worked at Pestalozzi-Froebel Haus in Germany to move to England and together they worked to improve child education, opening a school in St John’s Wood. [ABL85-86, In the Footsteps of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá p9-10]
  • Byfleet; United Kingdom Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, First Western tour; Alice Buckton; Drama; Plays; Education
    1912 21 or 22 Dec 'Abdu'l-Bahá witnessed His first dramatic performance. It was a mystery Christmas play entitled Eager Heart written by Miss Alice Buckton and performed at the Church House, Westminster before an audience of 1,200. [SoW Vol III no 19 2March1913 p 7, CH154, AB34]
  • He is reported to have said, perhaps on another occasion, "The stage will be the pulpit of the future". [Quoted by Loulie Mathews in The Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom, Vol 4, No. 3 (June 1923, p69]
  • Star of the West, Vol. 19 no. 11 Feb1929, p.341 quotes 'Abdu'l-Bahá as saying: "drama is of the utmost importance. It has been a great educational power in the past; it will be so again,". [BW1994-1995p255]
  • Westminster; London; United Kingdom Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Drama; Plays; Arts
    1912 c. Dec On another occasion He gave an outline for a play to his hostess for the evening, Mrs Gabrielle Enthoven, which He called Drama of the Kingdom. It was expanded into a play and put to print by Lady Blomfield's daughter, Mary Basil Hall, approved by the Reviewing Committees for the National Assemblies of both the British Isles and the United States and Canada. It was published in 1933. In 1994 a production based on this outline was premiered in Perth, Australia entitled The Face of Glory: A Musical Rendezvous with the Soul. [CH155-156, Bahá'ís and the Arts: Language of the Heart by Ann Boyles, also published in 1994-95 edition of The Bahá'í World, pp. 243-272] London; United Kingdom Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha, Writings and talks of; Abdul-Baha, Life of; Drama; Mary Basil Hall (Mary Bloomfield); Lady Blomfield; Publications; Drama of the Kingdom (play)
    1960 12 Jul Horace Hotchkiss Holley, Hand of the Cause of God, passed away in Haifa. (b. 7 April, 1887 in Torrington, CT) [MC226-227, BW13:849]
  • See FMH58-59 for the story of how he came to believe in the Faith.
  • He had served on the National Spiritual Assembly of the United States from 1923 until 1959 and as the secretary from 1924 to 1930 and 1932 until 1959. After the passing of the Guardian he served in the Holy Land. [UN110; BN No 347 January 1960 p1]
  • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the first contingent on the 24th of December, 1951. [MoCxxiii]
  • For his obituary see BW13:849–858.
  • For cable from the Hands of the Cause see MC217–18.
  • See also SBR214-247, LoF253-264 and Holley, Horace Hotchkiss by R. Jackson Armstrong-Ingram.
      Some of his is publications: See BEL7.1197 to 7.1233]
    • The Bahá'í Religion: Papers Read at the Conference on Some Living Religions Within the British Empire Papers presented by Horace Holley and Ruhi Afnan. 1925 [BEL7.386]
    • Bahaism: The Modern Social Religion, (1913) [BEL7.1203]
    • Religion for Mankind, (1956) [BEL7.1222]
    • World Unity,
    • Bahá'í, The Spirit of the Age, (1921) [BEL7.1201]
    • Bahá'í Scriptures; Selections from the Utterances of Bahaʼuʼllah and Abdul Baha, (1923 and 1928) The first general book-length compilation of the writings of Bahá'u'lláh and 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Many passages were early and nonauthoritative translations. The book was superseded by Bahá'í World Faith [BEL4.71]
    • Read-aloud Plays,
    • Divinations and Creation,
    • The World Economy of Baháʼuʼlláh
    • The Inner Garden; A Book of Verse
    • The Reality of Man (1931) [BEL3.103]
    • He was a man of enormous capacity. When asked about it he referred to a "zone of energy" in which he sometimes operated when more than normal strength was available to him. [FMH58]
  • Haifa; Torrington; Connecticut; United States Horace Holley; Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Births and deaths; Births and deaths; In Memoriam; Hands of the Cause, First Contingent; Bahai Scriptures (book); Drama; Plays; Arts
    1969. Jul - Aug The European Dawnbreakers’ Show, ‘‘A Plea for One World,” was conceived at a Swiss winter school by four young Baha’is from four countries. The original idea of a singing group blossomed into thirty-two Baha’is from ten countries presenting the message of Baha’u’ll4h through mime, songs, Baha’i scripture, and documented narrations. A total of eighteen performances were given in Holland, Germany, and Belgium. The five-week tour was organized by the Baha’i youth in Europe and supported by the National Spiritual Assembly of Germany [BN No 466 January 1970 p14] Holland,Germany; Belgium Proclamation; Teaching; Music; Drama
    2018. 8 Jul The opening of the play about Tahirih called Daughter of the Sun to an audience of 450 people at the Azerbaijan State Academic National Drama. The dramatic presentation was produced by journalist Kamale Selim Muslimgizi and came at a time when the life of Tahirih was gaining renewed attention and interest in Azerbaijani society due, in part because a book on Tahirih’s life and works that were translated and published in 2016 which catalyzed a growing interest among the people of Azerbaijan about the life of this iconic champion of women’s emancipation.
  • Tahirih wrote in Persian, Arabic, and Azeri, a widely spoken language in Qazvin and the surrounding region. Azeri is also the main language of Azerbaijan. Tahirih has long attracted interest among scholars. Western Orientalists of the 19th century wrote of her influence on literature and gender equality. In recent years, there have been numerous academic articles and books about her as well as translations of three volumes of her poetry into English.
  • The play continued its run in Baku and in the following months on stage in other cities across the country. [BWNS1276; 30 April, 1960]
  • Baku; Azerbaijan Tahirih; Drama; Plays; Arts; Kamale Selim Muslimgizi; BWNS

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. Behold!: A Program for the Bicentennial of the Birth of the Báb, by Anne Gordon Perry (2019). A fictionalized script of Bahá'í notables commenting on the 200th anniversary of the Bab's birth in 1819, based on passages from Robert Weinberg’s compilation The Primal Point: A selection of testimonials and tributes to the Báb and His followers. [about]
    2. Coming Out, by Ian Kluge (2001). Short, humorous play depicting the confusions that can result from trying to be too delicate in announcing one's commitment to the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    3. Cup of Tea, A, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season: Poems and Portrayals (1979). Monologue from the point of view of a fictitious character who meets 'Abdu’l-Baha. Upper class and prejudiced, she does not believe she can change her life sufficiently to embrace the Faith, but has a life-changing experience meeting the Master. [about]
    4. Drama of the Kingdom, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Mary Basil Hall (1933). A play written in 1912 by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá while he was in London and adopted with permission by Mary Basil Hall (named Parvine by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá). [about]
    5. Dramatic Readings, by Marlene Macke (2017). Nineteen screenplays prepared as part of a Writers' collective at Desert Rose Bahá'í Institute, either fictionalized dramatic presentations of pivotal events in Bahá'í history or adapted from historical books. [about]
    6. Dress for Mona, A: Abridged one-act version, by Mark Perry (2002). The story of Mona Mahmudnizhad. [about]
    7. Fiftieth Anniversary of The Master: Performance piece, by Jim Wood (1968). An artistic piece appropriate for play at the commemoration of the ascension of 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Produced, performed, and narrated by Jim Wood; also read by Deborah Buttrey. [about]
    8. Figures in a Garden, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional monologues of the Persian poet Táhirih (1817/18-1852) and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). [about]
    9. Glimpses of Abdu'l-Baha: Adapted from the Diary of Juliet Thompson, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season (1979). Portrayals and dramatizations in verse, adapted from recollections by Juliet Thompson. [about]
    10. God's Heroes: A Drama in Five Acts, by Laura Clifford Barney (1910). A play based on events in the lives of the early Babis, with a focus on Tahirih. [about]
    11. Indiscretion of Marie-Thérèse Beauchamps, The, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional dramatization of a recollection of seeing Abdu'l-Bahá in Montreal (1912). [about]
    12. Instrument of Music, The: A Musical Comedy, by Sarah Munro and David Cerpa (2019). Dramatization of the role of music in the expansion and consolidation of Bahá’í communities, drawing on the example of Latin America, and the impact and use of music to contribute to the growth of any community. [about]
    13. It Is Written: A Monologue Recounting the Episode of the Martyrdom of the Báb, by Naysan Sahba (2001). Fictional monologue of a character who participated in the execution of the Báb. [about]
    14. Josie McFadden, by Sarah Munro (2013). Josie McFadden is a fictitious character who works in the home of Reverend Frederick White and his wife, Jane Elizabeth White, actual people who hosted Abdu'l-Bahá in Edinburgh. Though this monologue is fiction, it is based on real events. [about]
    15. Laura Barney's Discipleship to 'Abdu'l-Bahá: Tracing a Theological Flow from the Middle East to the United States, 1900-1916, by Layli Maria Miron, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:1-2 (2018). How Laura Barney employed ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s teachings to influence social discourse as she taught the Bahá'í Faith in Europe and the United States. [about]
    16. Layli, Majnun, and the Infernal Tree, by Mark Perry (2001). Short play dealing with the story of Layli and Majnun and partly inspired by the Seven Valleys. [about]
    17. Letter of Jane LeDeau, by Janice Auth (2000). The story of Abdu'l-Bahá’s visit to Pittsburgh PA on May 7, 1912, as told through the eyes of a fictional observer at His talk. While the descriptions are specific to Pittsburgh at that time, this script can help serve as an example for other communities. [about]
    18. Light of the World: Selected Tablets of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2021). Tablets of ‘Abdul-Bahá describing aspects of the life of Bahá’u’lláh including the tribulations He suffered, events in His homeland, the purpose and greatness of His Cause, and the nature and significance of His Covenant. [about]
    19. Love of the Master, The: A Visit with Curtis Kelsey, by Nathan Ashelman (2012). Fictional dialogue of Curtis Kelsey's visit to a Bahá'í Conference in 1958, on the themes of Abdu'l-Bahá's all-encompassing love and joy; firmness in the Covenant; service. [about]
    20. Manifestations of God and the Master: Representation of in Portraits, Photographs, and Dramatic Presentations, by Shoghi Effendi and Universal House of Justice (n.d.). Excerpts on the use of imagery of the Central Figures in art, stage, and print. [about]
    21. Monologues on the Bicentenary of the Birth of Baha'u'llah and Howard University Visit Commemoration, by Vasu Mohan and Donna Denize (2017). Five biographical monologues delivered in the fictionalized voices of Harriett Gibbs Marshall, Laura Dreyfus Barney, Louis Gregory, Alain Locke, and Pocahontas Pope. [about]
    22. My Name is John Good, Servant of the Servant, by John Chesley (2013). John Good was a man who heard Abdu'l-Bahá speak at the Bowery Mission in New York in 1912. From his boyhood, he had spent most of his life in prison. The main material for this characterization is from the diary of Juliet Thompson et al. [about]
    23. Path of Beauty, The: The Literary Life of Amatu'l-Bahá Rúhíyyih Khánum, by Sandra Lynn Hutchison, in World Order, 31:2 (1999). An extensive review of the varied literary works of Ruhiyyih Khanum – poems, plays, ethical guidance, practical guidelines for Baha’i pioneering and teaching, inspirational essays, literary and scriptural commentary, biography, and even a film script. [about]
    24. Promise of Peace, by Anne Gordon Perry (2015). A dramatic reading for two voices, incorporating various excerpts from Bahá’í Writings. It's a flexible script and can be modified in any way. [about]
    25. Read-Aloud Plays, by Horace Holley (1916). Nine short plays. Contains no mention of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    26. Remembering The Master, by Rhonda Palmer and Anne Gordon Perry (2012). Variations on a script for 1-3 voices, with both monologue and presentation versions, consisting of fictionalized retelling of stories about Abdu'l-Bahá visiting America. [about]
    27. Sailor's Problem, The, by Ben Roskams (1995). A short play about unity featuring Sherlock Holmes. [about]
    28. Sarah Farmer Monologue, by Anne Gordon Perry (2005). Created for performance in the New Hampshire Chautauqua Series and at Green Acre, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Portsmouth Peace Treaty. [about]
    29. Settling the Score With Mr. Ogden Nash for the Seven Spiritual Ages of Mrs. Marmaduke Moore and Thereby Achieving if Not a Better Verse at Least a Longer Title, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season (1979). A dialogue for two readers, adapted from a poem. [about]
    30. Some Sort of Foreigner, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional dramatization of an encounter with Abdu'l-Bahá in 1911, and reflections on "this business of religion." [about]
    31. Spiritual Assembly's Growing Pains, A, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1976). A play, in 28 pages, showing "some of the workings of a Bahá'í Spiritual Assembly: some of the blunders, some of the problems; how certain types of people fit better into one office and others into another." [about]
    32. Tahirih (1816 - 1852), by Terre Ouwehand, in Voices from the Well, vol. 2 (1984). Written for performance in 1984, published 2015. [about]
    33. This Gem-Studded Crown: A Dramatic Sketch, by Sarah Munro and Sofie Geschier (2017). Fictional dialogue of the first of eight actual meetings between Martha Root and Queen Marie of Romania, in January 1926. [about]
    34. Two Shall Appear, by Olivia Kelsey, Revised Second Edition (1943). A play which attempts to depict in a brief form the background and some of the heroic events of Bahá'í history. [about]
    35. Vojdani: Ou, La quête: drame en huit tableaux, by Pierre Spierckel (2007). Drame relatant la recherche spirituelle de Vojdani telle que contée dans "Fire on the Mountain Top", joué par de jeunes gens bahá'ís et chercheurs. [about]
    36. Wildfire: Reflections on Music, Drama, and Dance, by Istvan Dely (2006). Istvan Dely's reflections on music, dance and drama within the Bahá'í community. [about]
     
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