Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "Knowledge of God"

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  1. Bahá'u'lláh and the Luminous Mind: Bahá'í Gloss on a Buddhist Puzzle, by Roland Faber, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Non-duality is of central importance to Buddhist thought and experience; on monism and non-dualism as reflected in Asian religious expressions, including Hinduism's Advaita Vedanta. [about]
  2. Dawn over Mount Hira and Other Essays, by Marzieh Gail (1976). A collection of essays on various topics of interest to Bahá'í studies and history. Most of these were first published in Star of the West and World Order between 1929 and 1971. [about]
  3. Firm Cord of Servitude, The, by Theo A. Cope, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). A call for a revisioning of mysticism's claims of "union with God" in light of the Bahá'í Teachings as well as Jungian psychology. [about]
  4. "He hath known God who hath known himself": A Deepening Course on the Bahá'í Revelation (2012). A lengthy compilation by the granddaughter of Howard Colby Ives designed to be a study guide to the Writings, covering knowledge of God, the station of the Manifestations, the nature of the Covenant, and the dynamics of creation, constancy, and servitude. [about]
  5. He who knoweth his self hath known his Lord (Man ‘arafa nafsahú faqad ‘arafa Rabbahú): Commentary, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). Translation by Shoghi Effendi, completed by Cole. Themes include Islamic mysticism and the meaning of detachment, the meaning of the hadith about knowing one's self, the meaning of Return, and the hadith "The believer is alive in both worlds." [about]
  6. Mizán of Affect in Material v. Metaphysical Models of Human Consciousness, The, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 32:3-4 (2023-07). Though Bahá'í teachings hold that the soul progresses after the body ceases to exist, the physical brain is essential to our development; emotional processing requires a healthy brain; the brain-as-transceiver model can help treat affective disorders. [about]
  7. Reason and the Bahá'í Writings: The Use and Misuse of Logic and Persuasion, by Ian Kluge (2001-09-02). How to study the Bahá'í Writings through the use of logic. [about]
  8. Zen Gloss on Baha'u'llah's Commentary on "He who knoweth his self knoweth his Lord", A, by Juan Cole (1996). A Buddhist interpretation of themes in Bahá'u'lláh's tablet on Islamic mysticism and a saying about knowing one's self. [about]
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