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Search for tag "Literature (general)"

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1852 20 Mar The publication of Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly by Harriet Beecher Stowe. It was the best-selling novel of the 19th century and the second best-selling book of that century, following the Bible. It is credited with helping fuel the abolitionist cause in the 1850s. In recent years, the negative associations with Uncle Tom's Cabin have, to an extent, overshadowed the historical impact of the book as a "vital antislavery tool. [Wikipedia]
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe was an ancestor of Ellen "Mother" Beecher who was a grandmother of Hand of the Cause of God Dorothy Baker.
  • United States Uncle Tom's Cabin: Life Among the Lowly; English literature; Literature (general); Race (general); Harriet Beecher Stowe; Ellen Beecher; Hands of the Cause; Dorothy Baker

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. The Woman Who Read Too Much: A Novel, by Bahíyyih Nakhjavani: Review, by Mary Sobhani (2018). [about]
    2. 'Abdu'l Bahá's Tablet of the Two Calls: Civilizing Barbarity, by Manooher Mofidi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). The relatioship between civilization and barbarity, and the capabilities of humanity. [about]
    3. 'Abdu'l-Bahá and Ezra Pound's Circle, by Elham Afnan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:2 (1994). On the 1911 meeting between Ezra Pound, the famous American modernist poet, and 'Abdu'l-Bahá; links between the Bahá'í Faith and a number of important avant-garde circles in the West. [about]
    4. Age of Anxiety and the Century of Light, The: Twentieth-Century Literature, the Poet's Mission, and the Vision of World Unity , by Suheil Badi Bushrui, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 13:1-4 (2003). W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, and Kahlil Gibran were writers who recognized and confronted the spiritual and intellectual crisis of their time. The mission of the poet is to bear witness, maintain the integrity of language, and express truths. [about]
    5. Ancient Poems as Means of Revelation, in an Early Tablet by Bahá'u'lláh, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). On the importance of poetry in the history of the Faith and in its Writings, and absolute detachment as a prerequisite for attainment unto the Divine Presence. Includes translation of a Tablet by Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    6. Author's Response to Commentaries on "The Purpose of Poetry", by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
    7. Bahá'í Faith and Science Fiction, The, by Lavie Tidhar, in Internet Review of Science Fiction (2004). Contacts between Sci-Fi and Bahá'í have so far been minimal, but the origins of these two seemingly-disparate groups are shared by Western influences of the Enlightenment, urbanization, industrialization, Modernism, and the world of mass consumption. [about]
    8. Bahá'í Faith and Science Fiction, The, by Lavie Tidhar, in nanobison, 1:2 (2005). Short essay published in a "speculative fiction e-zine." [about]
    9. Bridge over Troubled Waters: The City of Haifa in Lavie Tidhar's Stories, by Ehud Maimon, in Strange Horizons (2012). Brief mentions of the temple of the Bab and the terraces, and the place of Haifa and Mt. Carmel in some contemporary Israeli fiction. Includes photos. [about]
    10. Celestial Burning, A: A Selective Study of the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Jack McLean (2012). Style, content, and context of the major writings of the Guardian; providential history; critique of Hegel; the military metaphor; the language of interpretation; history of the apostolic age. [about]
    11. Characterization in the Writings of Shoghi Effendi: With Special Attention to Yahya, by Jack McLean (2000). The Guardian employed a creative literary device of adding moralistic comment about historical figures, such as kings and clerics, casting them as "heroes" or "villains." Mirza Yahya is depicted with aspects of the demonic. [about]
    12. Creative Circle, The: Art, Literature, and Music in Baha'i Perspective (1989). Essays on the arts including poetry, music, film, etc. and their role in the Bahá'í community. [about]
    13. Creative Circle: Art, Literature and Music in the Bahá'í Perspective, ed. Michael Fitzgerald: Review, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
    14. Dawn over Mount Hira and Other Essays, by Marzieh Gail (1976). A collection of essays on various topics of interest to Bahá'í studies and history. Most of these were first published in Star of the West and World Order between 1929 and 1971. [about]
    15. Dichotomies of Charles Dickens still hold true today, The, by Ted Slavin, in St. Catharines Standard (2011). On the state of the present-day world, which swings between the extremes of unprecedented achievements and unimaginable horrors. [about]
    16. Emergence of a Bahá'í Consciousness in World Literature: The Poetry of Roger White, by Ron Price (2002). A study of White's verse with a short biography and an analysis of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    17. Encyclopedia of Islam and The Muslim World, by William F. McCants and John Walbridge (2004). Articles on Abdu'l-Bahá, the Báb, Bahá'u'lláh, the Bábí and Bahá'í Faiths, Hujjatiya, Persian language and literature, Shaykhism, and Twelver Shi'ism. [about]
    18. Four Levels of Detachment in Doris Lessing's Shikasta,, The, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 14:3-4 (2004). The concept of detachment in Bahá’u’lláh’s Writings and its application to Doris Lessing’s Sufi-inspired novel, Shikasta; the reciprocal relation between detachment and attachment and service to the new prophet. [about]
    19. Genesis in King Lear: Joseph's Many-Colored Coat Suits Shakespeare, by Tom Lysaght, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Creative comparison of the biblical figure of Joseph and the character of Edgar in Shakespeare's King Lear, in light of the Báb’s and Bahá'u'lláh's Writings. [about]
    20. Good of the World and the Happiness of the Nations, The: A Study of Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature, by Elham Afnan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:4 (1989). The Bahá'í Writings, with their new understanding of human destiny, can bridge the gap between utopian visions of progress from 19th-century literature and dystopian visions of 20th-century fiction, disillusioned by war and social and economic disasters. [about]
    21. "Good of the World and the Happiness of the Nations: A Study of Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature," by Elham Afnan: Commentary, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    22. "In the Beginning Was the Word": Apocalypse and the Education of the Soul, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:4 (1993). Hidden meanings in scripture and the soul are metaphorically identified with the huris, or brides. The bridegroom, Bahá'ulláh, enters union as the marriage of the Manifestation with the Maid of Heaven, who releases the Logos and the newly created soul. [about]
    23. Iqbál and the Bábí-Bahá'í Faith, by Annemarie Schimmel, in The Bahá'í Faith and Islam (1990). One of the more influential Muslim thinkers of the first half of the 20th century, Iqbal expressed views on the the Bábí and Bahá'í religions in his dissertation "The Development of Metaphysics in Persia" and his poetical magnum opus the Javidnama. [about]
    24. Joycean Modernism in a Nineteenth-Century Qur'an Commentary?: A Comparison of The Báb's Qayyūm Al-Asmā' with Joyce's Ulysses, by Todd Lawson, in Erin and Iran: Cultural Encounters between the Irish and the Iranians, ed. H. E. Chehabi and Grace Neville (2015). Comparison of the formal structure of the two works and themes such as time; oppositions and their resolution; relation between form and content; prominence of epiphany; manifestation, advent and apocalypse; and the theme of heroism, reading and identity. [about]
    25. Kafka's spiritual dimension, by Greg Massiah, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 6 (1996). The metaphysical significance of Franz Kafka's work is often overlooked. An exploration of religion and spirituality in three of his best-known short stories: The Judgment, In the Penal Colony, and Before the Law. [about]
    26. List of Articles on BahaiTeachings.org, by John S. Hatcher (2015). List of online essays and articles by Dr. John Hatcher. [about]
    27. Literary Criticism, Theology and Deconstructionism, by Jack McLean (2001). A dynamic tension exists between literary criticism and theology as distinct but mutually beneficial forms of discourse, which can enrich Bahá'í Studies by deepening exegesis and by correlating Bahá'í teachings with progressive movements. [about]
    28. Literary History of Persia: Volumes 1-4, by E. G. Browne (1902). The essential text for students of Iranian literature through the ages. [about]
    29. Literary History of Persia, Volume 4: Modern Times (1500-1924), by E. G. Browne (1928). Volume 4 contains the first extensive catalogue of Bábí and Bahá'í literature published in English. To this day, the four-volume set is an essential text for students of Iranian literature. [about]
    30. Literature of Interpretation, The: Notes on the English Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Glenford Mitchell, in World Order, 7:2 (1972). The influence of the writings of Shoghi Effendi on the Bahá'í Faith is analogous to that of St. Augustine on Christianity, but infinitely more so. Includes discussion of the nature of exegesis, the Guardianship, and the scope of history. [about]
    31. Literature of Persia, The: A Lecture delivered to the Persia Society, by E. G. Browne (1912). A selection of Persian poetry, featuring poems by Nabil, Tahirih, and Bábí martyrs. [about]
    32. Long, Withdrawing Roar, The: The Crisis of Faith and Nineteenth-Century English Poetry, by Edwin McCloughan, in Solas, 2 (2002). A Bahá'í response to the argument that the crisis of faith in the late 19th century was conditioned by historical circumstances and has therefore little relevance for a contemporary reader. [about]
    33. Love, Power, and Justice, by William S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:3 (1999). The pursuit and abuse of power are moral choices for which there is no moral justification. [about]
    34. Mountain of God, The, by E. S. (Ethel Stefana) Stevens, in World Order, 4:3-4:4 (1911). Book excerpts, sympathetic portrayal by a non-Bahá'í of Abdu'l-Bahá and the small band of Bahá’ís who lived in Haifa and 'Akká early in 20th Century. [about]
    35. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Bahá'u'lláh in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
    36. Nazif, Suleyman, by Necati Alkan, in Encyclopaedia Iranica (2021). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
    37. New Cycle of Human Power, A: Abdu'l-Bahá's Encounters with Modernist Writers and Artists, by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í World (2021). On the impact of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá on a number of individuals who were at the cultural vanguard of a society undergoing rapid, radical change. [about]
    38. Notes on Persian Love Poems, by Marzieh Gail, in World Order (1968). A short history of Persian poetry. Includes a selection of poems by Hafiz, Rumi, Ali-Kuli Khan, and others, many related to the Bahá'í Faith or quoted by Bahá'u'lláh or Abdu'l-Bahá, and one written for Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    39. Ocean of His Words, by John Hatcher: Review, by Sen McGlinn, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    40. Perfection and Refinement: Towards an Aesthetics of the Bab, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). The writings of the Bab have implications for the "plastic" arts; significance for native traditions; relevance to the performing arts; and the concept of refinement which comes across in both the person and the writings of the Báb. [about]
    41. Phoenix and the Ashes: The Bahá'í Faith and the Modern Apocalypse, by Geoffrey Nash: Review, by John Huddleston, in dialogue magazine, 2:2-3 (1988). 19th-century optimism, disillusionment with contemporary society, philosophy of history, political theory, Arthur Koestler and Aldous Huxley, and the future of humanity. Includes review of Jon Winokur's The Portable Curmudgeon, by Robert Ballenger. [about]
    42. Place of Poetry in Religion and Society, The: An Interview of Robert E. Hayden with Douglas Ruhe, by Robert E. Hayden and Douglas Ruhe, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). Introduction by Hatcher to the life of Hayden (2014); transcript of a talk between Hayden and Douglas Ruhe in 1975 on the future of poetry, transcendence, American destiny, important American poets, the Library of Congress, and Bahá'í spirituality. [about]
    43. Postsecular Look at the Reading Motif in Bahiyyih Nakhjavani's The Woman Who Read Too Much, A, by Mary A. Sobhani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:1-2 (2015). Nakhjavani’s historical novel includes metaphors that underscore a link between the secular and the sacred through the material and metaphysical act of reading; cf. McClure’s Partial Faiths: Postsecular Fiction in the Age of Pynchon and Morrison. [about]
    44. Purpose of Poetry, The, by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:1 (1988). Justifications for the work of contemporary artists; now is the time for Bahá’ís to work towards the flowering of civilization, using art as a unifying force to create links of understanding; poetry provides a means of approaching spiritual reality. [about]
    45. "Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by David L. Erickson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    46. Re-florescence of Historical Romance in Nabil, The, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 5 (1932–1934) (1934). Essay reflecting on the dominant themes of The Dawn-Breakers, an early narrative of Bábí history authored by Nabil-i-A'zam. [about]
    47. Reunion with the Beloved: Poetry and Martyrdom (2004). Poetry by or in honor of early Bábí and Bahá'í martyrs. Includes foreword by Hushmand Fatheazam, and discussion of the concept of martyrdom, cultural issues, and history of persecutions. [about]
    48. Role of the Feminine in the New Era, The, by Marion Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). The  unveiled feminine, symbolized by the unveiling of the Persian poet Táhirih at the conference of Badasht in 1848, announces a long-awaited coming of age or psychic integration. [about]
    49. Saddlebag, The: A Fable for Doubters and Seekers, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani: Review, by Carolyn See, in Washington Post (2000). [about]
    50. Saddlebag: A Fable for Doubters and Seekers, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani: Review, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 12:1-4 (2002). [about]
    51. Scripture as Literature: Sifting through the layers of the text, by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 7 (1997). Literary and religious antecedents to some of the styles and genres of Bahá'í scripture. [about]
    52. Shelly's Life and Writings, by William Michael Rossetti, in The University Magazine, Volume 1 (1878). Brief overview of the Bábí Faith and Qurratu'l-Ayn vis-a-vis themes and personages in "The Revolt of Islam," a poem in twelve cantos composed by Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1817. [about]
    53. Shoghi Effendi: An approach to his artistic contribution to style in English literature and to standards in translation, by Nobel Perdu and Ismael Velasco, in Traducción, cultura e inmigración. Reflexiones interdisciplinares, ed. García Marcos et al. (2004). On the technical and literary features of Shoghi Effendi's translations of Bahá'í scriptures: translation vocabulary; interpretation; features of his 'neo-classical' English used to elevate the text.  [about]
    54. Spiritual Oppression in Frankenstein, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:4 (1999). Comparing Shelley’s depiction of a spiritual malaise in Frankenstein with Bahá’u’lláh’s definition in the Kitáb-i-Íqán of the oppression experienced at the end of a reigning spiritual dispensation by the soul who seeks God but does not know where to look. [about]
    55. Symbols of Individuation in E. S. Stevens's The Mountain of God, by Cal E. Rollins, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:4 (1989). Stevens’s novel records impressions of the Bahá'í community in ‘Akká and Haifa in 1911. The two main characters are moving through an "individuation process" which could lead them to the Bahá'í Faith. Jungian literary criticism explains the symbolism. [about]
    56. Text, Author, Reader and the Relationship with the Sacred, by Iscander Micael Tinto (2008). A preliminary survey of how the relationship between sacred scripture, its reader, and the author — the Manifestation of God — originates and develops, in the light of critical theory. [about]
    57. "The Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by Jack McLean, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    58. Under the Divine Lote Tree: Essays and Reflections, by Jack McLean (1999). 85 literary and theological existential essays on topics such as poetry, scripture, philosophy, spirituality, love, detachment, mysticism, joy, death, and theology. [about]
    59. Unveiling the Hidden Words, by Diana Malouf: An Extended Review, by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Book review, and a commentary on the need for Bahá'í academia aimed at a secular audience, and the possibility of updating the Guardian's translations when English evolves in the future. [about]
    60. Wisdom and Wit of Roger White, The: Two Reviews, by Marzieh Gail and Hilda Phillips, in dialogue magazine, 1:4 (1987). Reviews of White's books One Bird One Cage One Flight and A Sudden Music. [about]
     
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