Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "Non-violence"

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  1. Baha'i Institute Of Higher Education, The: A Creative And Peaceful Response To Religious Persecution In Iran, by Bahá'í International Community (1999-04-01). Overview of the history and architecture of BIHE, the independent, full-fledged, yet completely decentralized, university system run by Bahá'ís in Iran. [about]
  2. Bahá'í Tradition, The: The Return of Joseph and the Peaceable Imagination, by Todd Lawson, in Fighting Words: Religion, Violence, and the Interpretation of Sacred Texts, ed. John Renard (2012). Overview of the status of violence in the Bahá'í tradition, and the historical/social conditions in which these doctrines were articulated. [about]
  3. Constructive Imaginary, The, by Michael Karlberg, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 30:3 (2020). In a 2007 letter on the closing of the BIHE, the Universal House of Justice introduced the concept of "constructive resilience"; on the relationship of this to other concepts in discourses on social change, and its relevance to the exigencies of the age. [about]
  4. Constructive Resilience: The Bahá'í Response to Oppression, by Michael Karlberg, in Peace and Change, 35:2 (2010-04). Example of the non-adversarial approach of the Bahá'ís in Iran toward social change, their collective response to oppression, and heuristic insights into the dynamics of peace. [about]
  5. Constructive Resilience, by Firaydoun Javaheri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:4 (2018). How the perseverance of the Bahá'ís in Iran has resulted in the generality of the Iranian people beginning to admire and, in some cases, arising to assist the Bahá'ís. [about]
  6. Jainism and the Bahá'í Faith: Non-Violence and Plurality Across Time and Space, by Yifan Zhang, in ISJS-Transactions: A Quarterly Refereed Online Research Journal on Jainism, 6:2 (2022 April-June). Comparison of similarities in Bahá'í and Jain teachings, especially in non-violence and plurality across time and space. Link to article (offsite). [about]
  7. Liberation Theology and its Potential for Guidance Towards Peace on Earth: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Fleur Fallon, in 75 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Australasia (1996). Bahá'u'lláh prescribed both a moral code for individuals based on knowing God and a design for a system of world government. These offer the most holistic answer for liberation theologians today. [about]
  8. Mahatma Gandhi and the Bahá'ís: Striving towards a Nonviolent Civilization, by M. V. Gandhimohan (2000). Review of Ghandi's comments about the Faith as well as relationships between his ideas and those of the religion. [about]
  9. Pursuit of Social Justice, The, by Michael Karlberg, in Bahá'í World (2022-08-03). An interdisciplinary examination of prevailing conceptions of human nature, power, social organization, and social change, and their implications for the pursuit of peace and justice. [about]
  10. Radiant Acquiescence, by Orcella Rexford, in World Order (1937-09). "Radiant acquiescence" (ridá') means not only to give up your will to the Divine Will, but to do so joyfully and with radiance, knowing it is the best way in the end. [about]
  11. Reis naar het Hart van de Qur'án: Het Heilige Boek van de islam voor hen die nadenken (door een niet-moslim), by David Russell Garcia (2022). Een overzicht van de Koran en zijn thema's: islam versus het christendom; wetten, geestelijke en sociale principes; heilige oorlog en vechten; redenen achter de reputatie van de islam als een oorlogsreligie; apocalypse. [about]
  12. Religious Intolerance as a Source of Violence, by Udo Schaefer, in World without Violence: World leaders share their commentaries on world harmony, peace and justice, Arun Gandhi, ed. (1994). A Bahá'í-inspired examination of how religious fanaticism and prejudice promotes violence. [about]
  13. Religious Persecution and Oppression: A Study of Iranian Baha'ís' Strategies of Survival, by Naghme Naseri Morlock, in Journal of Hate Studies, 17:2 (2021). Research based on extensive interviews exploring three ways that members of the Bahá'í community responded to diaspora and persecution: passing as Muslim, religious constancy in the face of danger, and alternating "passing" with open displays. [about]
  14. Violence Against Women and Children, by Universal House of Justice, in American Bahá'í (1993-11-23). Bahá’í principles on violence, sexual abuse, family dynamics, gender equality, consultation, child discipline, and community protection. [about]
  15. Voyage to the Heart of the Koran: The Holy Book of Islám for Thinking Minds (By a Non-Muslim), by David Russell Garcia (2003-10). A lengthy overview of the Qur'án and its themes for a Bahá'í audience; holy war and fighting; reasons behind Islám's reputation as a war-like religion; theology of Islám vs. Christianity; laws and admonitions; spiritual and social principles; apocalypse. [about]
 
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