Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.

Search for tag "Philosophy, Greek"

  1. from the Chronology
  2. from the Chronology Canada
  3. from the Main Catalog

from the chronology of Canada

from the main catalogue

  1. Answered Questions, Some: A Philosophical Perspective, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). Philosophical foundations of the Bahá’í teachings, including ontology, theology, epistemology, philosophical anthropology and psychology, and personal and social ethics. [about]
  2. Archeology of the Kingdom of God, The, by Jean-Marc Lepain (2015). Analysis of the spiritual worlds as depicted in philosophical and religious texts, from ancient the Greek to Jewish, Christian and Muslim thought, contrasted with the theosophy, metaphysics, anthropology, and hermeneutics of Baha'u'llah and 'Abdu'l-Baha. [about]
  3. Aristotelian Substratum of the Bahá'í Writings, The, by Ian Kluge, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
  4. Bahá'í Perspective on the Origin of Matter, A, by Keven Brown, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:3 (1990). The origin of matter is spiritual. Science sees that, at its most fundamental level, reality is not particular materials or structures, but probabilities and transformation. The four elements, three-fold structure of being, and balance are also examined. [about]
  5. Bahá'u'lláh's "Most Sublime Vision", by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). [about]
  6. Body, Mind, Soul and Spirit, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The Baha'i view of human nature involves an interaction between spirit, soul and body — these three elements exist both in the Semitic religions and in the Far Eastern ones; Western dualist and Eastern monist traditions are in fact all tripartite. [about]
  7. Discourse, Identity, and Global Citizenship, by Michael Karlberg, in Peace Review: A Journal of Social Justice, 20:3 (2008). What does it mean to be a "global citizen"? From early Greek times, the concept of citizenship expanded from "inhabitant of a city" to a democratic ideal of self-determination. It now includes global relationships, interdependence, and altruism. [about]
  8. Further Comments on a Passage of the Lawh-i-Hikmat, by Amin E. Egea, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). A study of Pre-Islamic sources on the relation of Greek Philosophers and Jewish sages. [about]
  9. Hermes Trismegistus and Apollonius of Tyana in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Keven Brown, in Revisioning the Sacred: New Perspectives on a Bahá'í Theology, Studies in the Babi and Bahá'í Religions, vol. 8 (1997). History of alchemy, magic, and the hermetic arts, and their reflection in the later teachings of Baha'u'llah. [about]
  10. Miscellaneous philosophy topics, by John Walbridge, in Essays and Notes on Babi and Bahá'í History (2002). Islamic vs. Baha'i philosophy; Greek philosophers and the Jews; other topics of philosophy. [about]
  11. Origins of the Bahá'í Concept of Unity and Causality: A Brief Survey of Greek, Neoplatonic, and Islamic Underpinnings, by Babak Rod Khadem, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
  12. Socrates, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
  13. Socrates in History and the Bahá'í Writings, by Universal House of Justice (1995). Historical facts known about Socrates, some of the difficulties inherent in endeavouring to unravel the historical Socrates, and quotations from the Baha'i Writings. [about]
  14. Socrates'/Plato's Use of Rhetoric: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Bret Breneman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:1 (1991). [about]
 
See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.
Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
.
. .