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Search for tag "Robert Hayden"

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date event locations tags see also
1980 25 Feb Robert Hayden, much-honoured American poet, passed away in Ann Arbor, Michigan. [BW18:717]
  • For his obituary see BW18:715–17.
  • See also Hatcher, From The Auroral Darkness: The Life and Poetry of Robert Hayden.
  • See Bahá'í World 1994-95 pg249 for an article by Anne Boyles entitled "The Language of the Heart: Arts in the Bahá'í World Community" for mention of Robert Hayden.
  • See The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature entry about Robert Hayden.
  • In 1976, Mr. Hayden was named Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, a post which was later renamed Poet Laureate of the United States. He was the first African-American to hold the position. He taught at Fisk University in Nashville for 23 years and then at the University of Michigan from 1969 until his death in 1980 at age 66. In 2012 the US Postal Service issued a series of stamps commemorating poets which included Mr Hayden. [BWNS915]
  • Ann Arbor; Michigan Robert Hayden; Poetry; In Memoriam; Births and deaths; Poet Laureate; Commemorative stamp

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. Amazing Nashville Baha'i Community in the 1960s, The, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:4 (2019). "From the Editor's Desk": Hatcher's personal memories of time in Nashville; overview of the lives of Robert Hayden and Magdalene Carney. [about]
    2. "Angle of Ascent", The: Process and Achievement in the Work of Robert Hayden, by Ann Boyles, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:4 (1992). Hayden's poetry explores the process of individual and collective social and spiritual transformation in the contexts of contemporary culture, the Bahá'í Faith, black history, art, literature, nature, disease, and suffering. [about]
    3. Collected Poems of Robert Hayden, by Robert Hayden: Review, by Harryette Mullen, in The Antioch Review, 53 (1997). [about]
    4. Hayden, Robert, by Christopher Buck and Derik Smith, in Oxford Research Encyclopedia, Literature (2019). In his poetics of history and his nuanced representations of black life, Hayden's art showed that the African American experience was quintessentially American, and that blackness was an essential aspect of heterogeneous America. [about]
    5. Hayden, Robert Earl, by Robert M. Greenberg, in American National Biography Online (2000). The life and work of Hayden (1913-1980), African-American poet and teacher; his membership of the Bahá'í Faith is briefly mentioned. [about]
    6. Hidden Meanings in the Poetry of Robert Hayden, by Duane L. Herrmann (2012). The Bahá'í Faith influenced Hayden's work on multiple levels, beyond his obvious allusions to the Bahá'í teachings regarding brotherhood of races or acceptance of religions. [about]
    7. Life and Poetry of Robert Hayden, The: A Baha'i Perspective, by Ann Boyles (2004). [about]
    8. Place of Poetry in Religion and Society, The: An Interview of Robert E. Hayden with Douglas Ruhe, by Robert E. Hayden and Douglas Ruhe, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). Introduction by Hatcher to the life of Hayden (2014); transcript of a talk between Hayden and Douglas Ruhe in 1975 on the future of poetry, transcendence, American destiny, important American poets, the Library of Congress, and Bahá'í spirituality. [about]
    9. Poetry and Self-Transformation, by Roger White, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Poetry is no longer very accessible to the average reader or widely read; serious poets are often in conflict with their times; the Bahá'í Writings provide a foundation for poetic expression and a renewed spiritual aesthetics. [about]
    10. Racial Identity and the Patterns of Consolation in the Poetry of Robert Hayden, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:2 (1990). The dramatic tension in Robert Hayden’s poetry has often been mistaken for personal ambivalence and confusion with regard to both his ethnic identity and his beliefs as a Bahá’í — rather than the clear pattern of consolation that unites them. [about]
    11. Robert Hayden, by Christopher Buck, in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature, Vol. 2, ed. Jay Parini (2004). The first African American poet-laureate of the United States (as Library of Congress "Consultant in Poetry"). [about]
    12. Robert Hayden and Being Politically Correct, by Duane L. Herrmann (1993). Robert Hayden did not bow to or rebel against expectations of political correctness, and regarded his race as "human" rather than "black." He embraced his African-American identity, but did not want to be defined by it. [about]
    13. Robert Hayden's 'American Journal': A Multidimensional Analysis, by Christopher Buck, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2 (2008). A study of an often neglected poem which combines an informal cultural analysis of the USA with a social commentary on the world. It treats the human race from a universal perspective, emphasizing the importance of human solidarity. [about]
    14. Robert Hayden's Epic of Community, by Benjamin Friedlander, in Melus (1998). A study of Hayden's poetry in the context of the American experience. [about]
    15. Tales of Magnificent Heroism: The Impact of the Báb and His Followers on Writers and Artists, by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í World (2019). This concise survey explores how this particular episode in humanity’s religious history resonated so strongly through the decades that followed. [about]
     
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