Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "World citizenship"

from the main catalogue

  1. Bahá'í Approach to Cosmopolitan Ideas in International Relations, The, by Nalinie N. Mooten (2005). On Western cosmopolitan thought from its infancy to the present day and on a Bahá’í cosmopolitan model to International Relations (IR), which reinforces ideas based on essential oneness. [about]
  2. Bahá'í Approach to Cosmopolitan Ideas in International Relations, The, by Nalinie N. Mooten (2006-11-14). A Bahá’í approach to the cosmopolitan tradition in International Relations theory; contributions the Bahá’í model can offer to this growing tradition; cosmopolitanism as articulated by the Cynics in ancient Greece and by Enlightenment philosophies. [about]
  3. Bahá'í Contribution to Cosmopolitan International Relations Theory, The, by Nalinie N. Mooten, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Bahá’í concepts of global governance, unity in diversity, and ethical reform as contributions to a cosmopolitan International Relations theory. [about]
  4. Developing a Participatory Approach to Learning, by Maija Pihlainen, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:2 (1991). The Macau-based School of the Nations’ philosophy of education, and its implications for the school’s curriculum development process. The Bahá'í approach to education emphasizes moral education, participation, cooperation, and consultation. [about]
  5. Education for Interdependence: The University and the Global Citizen, by Michael Karlberg, in Global Studies Journal, 3:1 (2010). This paper advocates the value of an outcomes-based approach to global citizenship education and suggests a framework of core learning outcomes that can guide and inform the development of global citizenship curricula in universities. [about]
  6. Global Citizenship and Humanities Scholarship: Toward a Twenty-First Century Agenda, by Michael Karlberg and Cheshmak Farhoumand-Sims, in International Journal of the Humanities, 2:3 (2006). In this age of global interdependence, the critique of anachronistic social constructs is necessary but insufficient. Scholars must articulate new approaches to globalization. The international Bahá'í community illustrates a constructive, humane approach. [about]
  7. Global Scholars as Ambassadors of Knowledge, by Boris Handal, in Academic Migration, Discipline Knowledge and Pedagogical Practice: Voices from the Asia Pacific, eds. F. Rawling and C. Mason (2013). Global scholars can face challenges interacting with peers and with the community of their destination cultures, but can become agents of social change due to their unique overseas positions, and teach global citizenship, moral leadership, and unity. [about]
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