Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.
>>   Personal compilations Study Guides
TAGS: Lawh-i-Ibn-i-Dhib (Epistle to the Son of the Wolf); Self-quotations of Bahaullah; Teachings
> add/edit tags
Abstract:
Compares Baha'u'llah's self-quotations in the Epistle with their earlier versions.
Notes:

Epistle to the Son of the Wolf (Lawh-i-Ibn-i-Dhib):
Self-quotations from Baha'u'llah found in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf

compiled by Dianne Bradford.
1998
In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh often quotes Himself from Tablets He had previously revealed. This paper will attempt to locate and list as many of these passages as possible, in the order in which they appear in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. In addition, when available, the same passage from the original Tablet from which Bahá'u'lláh was most likely quoting will immediately follow the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, as well with as much information as is available regarding the Source to which the Blessed Beauty was referring in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. The juxtaposition of these passages will enable the reader to compare them carefully if desired.

      It may be noticed that Bahá'u'lláh does not always quote Himself exactly, but will sometimes change a word or two, prompting one to study even more carefully both passages in context with the Tablet in which they appear to try to discern what change in meaning may be intended by the change in wording. Though at times I will venture a guess at the meaning behind the change in wording, the reader must keep in mind that this is totally my own opinion and is not an official interpretation. Each individual should study these changes and try to discern the meaning for him/herself. Another possibility for these changes may simply be in the translations of these passages. Epistle to the Son of the Wolf was revealed in Arabic and Bahá'u'lláh would dictate these passages rather than have His amenuensis look up and then include in this Tablet the passages to which He was referring. Some of these passages were originally revealed in Persian and, therefore, translated into English from Persian. Therefore, the translation from the original Persian Tablet into English could conceivably differ slightly from that same passage revealed and translated from the Arabic —even if it was revealed again word for word from the original.

      Please note that, since much of Baha1u'llah's Writings have not yet been translated into English, not every passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf presented will have an accompanying passage from an earlier work. Once again we have the beloved Guardian, Shoghi Effendi, to thank for his translation into English of so many of the Blessed Beauty's Writings, including Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, which may be the only Source of some of these earlier passages. We are truly blessed!




      In this first passage presented, Bahá'u'lláh explicitly states that the passage is from His Tablet to the Sháh of Persia [the Lawh-i-Sultán]. This same passage from the Lawh-i-Sultán follows. You may notice that the two versions are identical in every word.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O King! I was but a man like others, asleep upon My couch, when lo, the breezes of the All-Glorious were wafted over Me, and taught Me the knowledge of all that hath been. This thing is not from Me, but from One Who is Almighty and All-Knowing. And He bade Me lift up My voice between earth and heaven, and for this there befell Me what hath caused the tears of every man of understanding to flow. The learning current amongst men I studied not; their schools I entered not. Ask of the city wherein I dwelt, that thou mayest be well assured that I am not of them who speak falsely. This is but a leaf which the winds of the will of thy Lord, the Almighty, the All-Praised, have stirred. Can it be still when the tempestuous winds are blowing? Nay, by Him Who is the Lord of all Names and Attributes! They move it as they list. The evanescent is as nothing before Him Who is the Ever-Abiding. His all-compelling summons hath reached Me, and caused Me to speak His praise amidst all people. I was indeed as one dead when His behest was uttered. The hand of the will of thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Merciful, transformed Me."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 12, pp. 11-12.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
O King! I was but a man like others, asleep upon My couch, when lo, the breezes of the All-Glorious were wafted over Me, and taught Me the knowledge of all that hath been. This thing is not from Me, but from One Who is Almighty and All-Knowing. And He bade Me lift up My voice between earth and heaven, and for this there befell Me what hath caused the tears of every man of understanding to flow. The learning current amongst men I studied not; their schools I entered not. Ask of the city wherein I dwelt, that thou mayest be well assured that I am not of them who speak falsely. This is but a leaf which the winds of the will of thy Lord, the Almighty, the All-Praised, have stirred. Can it be still when the tempestuous winds are blowing? Nay, by Him Who is the Lord of all Names and Attributes! They move it as they list. The evanescent is as nothing before Him Who is the Ever-Abiding. His all-compelling summons hath reached Me, and caused Me to speak His praise amidst all people. I was indeed as one dead when His behest was uttered. The hand of the will of thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Merciful, transformed Me.
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Lawh-i-Sultán, Page: 57)




      This next passage is one for which I was unable to find an English translation from another Tablet. Therefore, only the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is listed here. I was, however, able to find out a little about this passage from the Bahá'í scholar, Dr. Iraj Ayman. Regarding this passage, Dr. Ayman writes the following: This quote belongs to the opening of a very important Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh. 'Its original text in Persian is printed in a collection of Tablets called "Ishraqat" pages 133-143. The English translation of the first part of this Tablet including this quote is item CXXXII in the Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh p. 287. In addition to the Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh has quoted this portion of this Tablet in some other Tablets too, e.g. in rather long and yet unpublished Tablet addressed to "Hazrat-i-Amin", the first Trustee of Huququ'llah.'

      Please note: the passage from Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh mentioned by Dr. Ayman was taken from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and, therefore, I am not quoting it as the other Source of this quote.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"The purpose of the one true God, exalted be His glory, hath been to bring forth the Mystic Gems out of the mine of man—they Who are the Dawning-Places of His Cause and the Repositories of the pearls of His knowledge; for, God Himself, glorified be He, is the Unseen, the One concealed and hidden from the eyes of men. Consider what the Merciful hath revealed in the Qur'an: No vision taketh in Him, but He taketh in all vision, and He is the Subtile, the All-Informed!"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 16, p. 13.]




      The next four passages which Bahá'u'lláh quotes in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf were easy to find in His earlier Writings as they are all taken from The Hidden Words. They are presented next one after the other, with the corresponding Hidden Word immediately following the quoted passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      In comparing these first two passages, you may notice that the only change in wording is one of singular vs. plural. In The Hidden Words, Persian Hidden Word #24, Bahá'u'lláh says "shepherds" (plural and more general), whereas in the same passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He says "the shepherd" (singular and possibly more specific). One observation is that in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh is addressing one person, the Shaykh (also known as the Son of the Wolf) who, as a Shaykh, himself wears the guise of a shepherd for the followers of Islam. Perhaps by saying "the shepherd" Bahá'u'lláh was directing this particular passage to the Shaykh, to clearly include him this particular passage from The Hidden Words.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O ye that are foolish, yet have a name to be wise! Wherefore do ye wear the guise of the shepherd, when inwardly ye have become wolves, intent upon My flock? Ye are even as the star, which riseth ere the dawn, and which, though it seem radiant and luminous, leadeth the wayfarers of My city astray into the paths of perdition."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 23, p. 16.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O YE THAT ARE FOOLISH, YET HAVE A NAME TO BE WISE!
Wherefore do ye wear the guise of shepherds, when inwardly ye have become wolves, intent upon My flock? Ye are even as the star, which riseth ere the dawn, and which, though it seem radiant and luminous, leadeth the wayfarers of My city astray into the paths of perdition."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, The Hidden Words, from the Persian, No. 24.]

      The only difference that I can spot in these next two passages is the word "sunbeam", which is one word in the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf but is separated into two separate words, "sun beam", in The Hidden Words. If there is a significance to this, I can't discern it. My only thought on this is that it may be one of those translation differences. However, it may have been intentional; I don't know. Regardless, the passages are precious.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"...O ye seeming fair yet inwardly foul! Ye are like clear but bitter water, which to outward seeming is crystal pure but of which, when tested by the Divine Assayer, not a drop is accepted. Yea, the sunbeam falls alike upon the dust and the mirror, yet differ they in reflection even as doth the star from the earth: nay, immeasurable is the difference!"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 24, p. 16.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O YE SEEMING FAIR YET INWARDLY FOUL!
Ye are like clear but bitter water, which to outward seeming is crystal pure but of which, when tested by the divine Assayer, not a drop is accepted. Yea, the sun beam falls alike upon the dust and the mirror, yet differ they in reflection even as doth the star from the earth: nay, immeasurable is the difference!"

      [Bahá'u'lláh, The Hidden Words, from the Persian, No. 25.]




      In the next two passages from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf I could find no differences whatever between the wording in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and The Hidden Words from which they were quoted.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "O essence of desire! At many a dawn have I turned from the realms of the Placeless unto thine abode, and found thee on the bed of ease busied with others than Myself. Thereupon, even as the flash of the spirit, I returned to the realms of celestial glory, and breathed it not in My retreats above unto the hosts of holiness."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 25, p. 16.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O ESSENCE OF DESIRE!
At many a dawn have I turned from the realms of the Placeless unto thine abode, and found thee on the bed of ease busied with others than Myself. Thereupon, even as the flash of the spirit, I returned to the realms of celestial glory and breathed it not in My retreats above unto the hosts of holiness."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, The Hidden Words, from the Persian, No. 28.]

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "...O bond slave of the world! Many a dawn hath the breeze of My loving-kindness wafted over thee and found thee upon the bed of heedlessness fast asleep. Bewailing then thy plight it returned whence it came."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 26, p. 16.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O BOND SLAVE OF THE WORLD!
Many a dawn hath the breeze of My loving-kindness wafted over thee and found thee upon the bed of heedlessness fast asleep. Bewailing then thy plight it returned whence it came."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, The Hidden Words, from the Persian, No. 30.]




      In the following passage, though Bahá'u'lláh lists His Source by preceding it with the phrase, "In the Tablet to His Majesty the Sháh it is written:", I was unable to find an English translation for it in the Lawh-i-Sultán (the Tablet to the Shah of Persia) or any other Tablet which has been translated into English at this time. The Lawh-i-Sultán at his time has not been completely translated into English and this passage is probably taken from one of those sections not yet translated. The Lawh-i-Sultán is, however, in the process of being retranslated at the World Center and, therefore, this passage may soon be made available for comparison.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
In the Tablet to His Majesty the Sháh it is written: "By Him Who is the Truth! I fear no tribulation in His path, nor any affliction in My love for Him. Verily God hath made adversity as a morning dew upon His green pasture, and a wick for His lamp which lighteth earth and heaven."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 28, p. 17.]




      The following passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is a passage for which I was unable to find an English translation for the Source of this quote. On pages 22-23 of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh precedes
these quotes with the following: 'We shall herewith cite a few passages from Tablets specifically revealed to this people, so that every one may know of a certainty that this Wronged One hath acted in a manner which hath been pleasing
and acceptable unto men endued with insight, and unto such as are the exponents of justice and equity:'

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "O ye friends of God in His cities and His loved ones in His lands! This Wronged One enjoineth on you honesty and piety. Blessed the city that shineth by their light. Through them man is exalted, and the door of security is unlocked before the face of all creation. Happy the man that cleaveth fast unto them, and recognizeth their virtue, and woe betide him that denieth their station."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 38, p. 23.]




      The next passage presented from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is again one for which I could not find the original Source of the quote. I did, however, locate part of this passage in the Words of Paradise Tablet. This Tablet does not seem to be the original but, rather, Bahá'u'lláh seems to be quoting Himself in this Tablet as well, most likely from the same Source from which He is quoting in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. If you compare them closely, you will notice a few changes in wording between these two passages.

      He first change is the addition of the phrase, "neither the tribulations I suffer," in the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      Secondly is the omission of the word "do" from the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf in the phrase, "nor do the things that have befallen Me at the hands of My enemies."

      Thirdly, the use of the word "enemies" in the Words of Paradise Tablet and "oppressors" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. By equating these two terms, He may be indicating whom He considers to be His "enemies"—the "oppressors". This would also be supported by Persian Hidden Word #64, which is headed by "o OPPRESSORS ON EARTH!" and in which He states "I have pledged Myself not to forgive any man's injustice", adding that this has been "irrevocably decreed".

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"We enjoin the servants of God and His handmaidens to be pure and to fear God, that they may shake off the slumber of their corrupt desires, and turn toward God, the Maker of the heavens and of the earth. Thus have We commanded the faithful when the Daystar of the world shone forth from the horizon of Iraq. My imprisonment doeth Me no harm, neither the tribulations I suffer, nor the things that have befallen Me at the hands of My oppressors. That which harmeth Me is the conduct of those who, though they bear My name, yet commit that which maketh My heart and My pen to lament. They that spread disorder in the land, and lay hands on the property of others, and enter a house without leave of its owner, We, verily, are clear of them, unless they repent and return unto God, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Merciful."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 39, p. 23.]

We have said: 'My imprisonment doeth Me no harm, nor do the things that have befallen Me at the hands of My enemies. That which harmeth Me is the conduct of my loved ones who, though they bear My name, yet commit that which maketh My heart and My pen to lament. '
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise, 9th Leaf, Page: 70)




      This next passage is again one for which I could not find the original Source.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O peoples of the earth! Haste ye to do the pleasure of God, and war ye valiantly, as it behooveth you to war, for the sake of proclaiming His resistless and immovable Cause. We have decreed that war shall be waged in the path of God with the armies of wisdom and utterance, and of a goodly character and praiseworthy deeds. Thus hath it been decided by Him Who is the All-Powerful, the Almighty. There is no glory for him that committeth disorder on the earth after it hath been made so good. Fear God, O people, and be not of them that act unjustly."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 40, p. 24.]




      Though I could not find the original Source for this next passage, I was able to find it partially quoted in God Passes By and so have included that passage from God Passes By. However, I do not know if Shoghi Effendi, in this passage, was quoting from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf or from Bahá'u'lláh's original Source of the quote. I have also included the passage from The Kitáb-i-Aqdas to which I believe Bahá'u'lláh was referring when He wrote: "In the Book of God, the Mighty, the Great, ye have been forbidden to engage in contention and conflict."

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Revile ye not one another. We, verily, have come to unite and weld together all that dwell on earth. Unto this beareth witness what the ocean of Mine utterance hath revealed amongst men, and yet most of the people have gone astray. If anyone revile you, or trouble touch you, in the path of God, be patient, and put your trust in Him Who heareth, Who seeth. He, in truth, witnesseth, and perceiveth, and doeth what He pleaseth, through the power of His sovereignty. He, verily, is the Lord of strength, and of might. In the Book of God, the Mighty, the Great, ye have been forbidden to engage in contention and conflict. Lay fast hold on whatever will profit you, and profit the peoples of the world. Thus commandeth you the King of Eternity, Who is manifest in His Most Great Name. He, verily, is the Ordainer, the All-Wise."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 41, p. 24.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
...the principle of the oneness and wholeness of the human race, which may well be regarded as the hall-mark of Bahá'u'lláh's Revelation and the pivot of His teachings. Of such cardinal importance is this principle of unity that it is expressly referred to in the Book of His Covenant, and He unreservedly proclaims it as the central purpose of His Faith. "We, verily," He declares, "have come to unite and weld together all that dwell on earth." "So potent is the light of unity," He further states, "that it can illuminate the whole earth." "At one time," He has written with reference to this central theme of His Revelation, "We spoke in the language of the lawgiver; at another in that of the truth seeker and the mystic, and yet Our supreme purpose and highest wish hath always been to disclose the glory and sublimity of this station."
      (Shoghi Effendi: God Passes By, Page: 217)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Ye have been forbidden in the Book of God to engage in contention and conflict, to strike another, or to commit similar acts whereby hearts and souls may be saddened."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 148, Pages: 72-73)




      Once again I was unable to find this next quote elsewhere in its entirety. However, in Bahá'u'lláh's Glad-Tidings Tablet He also abolishes the law of holy war; therefore, that section of the Tablet is also presented for comparison with His quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. As you may notice, the wording of the two passages is quite different.
"Beware lest ye shed the blood of any one. Unsheathe the sword of your tongue from the scabbard of utterance, for therewith ye can conquer the citadels of men's hearts. We have abolished the law to wage holy war against each other. God's mercy hath, verily, encompassed all created things, if ye do but understand."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 42, p. 25.]

"The first Glad-Tidings which the Mother Book hath, in this Most Great Revelation, imparted unto all the peoples of the world is that the law of holy war hath been blotted out from the Book. Glorified be the All-Merciful, the Lord of grace abounding, through Whom the door of heavenly bounty hath been flung open in the face of all that are in heaven and on earth."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Glad-Tidings, 1st Glad-Tidings, Pages:21-22)




      Though the themes of these next three passages from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf run through many of Bahá'u'lláh's Tablets and Books, I could not find one Source for any of them which would appear to be the Source from which Bahá'u'lláh was quoting.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O people! Spread not disorder in the land, and shed not the blood of any one, and consume not the substance of others wrongfully, neither follow every accursed prattler."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 43, p. 25.]

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"The Sun of Divine Utterance can never set, neither can its radiance be extinguished. These sublime words have, in this day, been heard from the Lote-Tree beyond which there is no passing: 'I belong to him that loveth Me, that holdeth fast My commandments, and casteth away the things forbidden him in My Book.'"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 44, p. 25.]

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf :
"This is the day to make mention of God, to celebrate His praise, and to serve Him; deprive not yourselves thereof. Ye are the letters of the words, and the words of the Book. Ye are the saplings which the hand of Loving-kindness hath planted in the soil of mercy, and which the showers of bounty have made to flourish. He hath protected you from the mighty winds of misbelief, and the tempestuous gales of impiety, and nurtured you with the hands of His loving providence. Now is the time for you to put forth your leaves, and yield your fruit. The fruits of the tree of man have ever been and are goodly deeds and a praiseworthy character. Withhold not these fruits from the heedless. If they be accepted, your end is attained, and the purpose of life achieved. If not, leave them in their pastime of vain disputes. Strive, O people of God, that haply the hearts of the divers kindreds of the earth may, through the waters of your forbearance and loving-kindness, be cleansed and sanctified from animosity and hatred, and be made worthy and befitting recipients of the splendors of the Sun of Truth."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 45, pp. 25-26.]




      For this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh once again very specifically mentions the Source from which He is quoting, making the locating of the corresponding quote very easy to do. The only difference I can find between these two passages is that Bahá'u'lláh includes an extra sentence, "Every cause needeth a helper", at the beginning of His quote in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. The remainder of the passages are once again an exact, word-for-word quote.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
In the fourth Ishráq (splendor) of the Ishráqát (Tablet of Splendors) We have mentioned: "Every cause needeth a helper. In this Revelation the hosts which can render it victorious are the hosts of praiseworthy deeds and upright character. The leader and commander of these hosts hath ever been the fear of God, a fear that encompasseth all things, and reigneth over all things."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 46, p. 26.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The fourth Ishráq
      In this Revelation the hosts that can render it victorious are the hosts of praiseworthy deeds and upright character. The leader and commander of these hosts hath ever been the fear of God, a fear that encompasseth all things and reigneth over all things."

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Ishráqát, fourth Ishráq, Page: 126)




      As in the previous passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh again clearly cites His Source for this next passage. Again, the two passages are, for the most part, word-for-word identical. The only places in which they differ are in the first and last sentences of the two passages. You may want to especially note how, in the last sentance, Bahá'u'lláh replaces "on the day of His return" in the third Tajallí with " in this conspicuous station" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
'In the third Tajallí (effulgence) of the Book of Tajalliyát (Book of Effulgences) We have mentioned: "Arts, crafts and sciences uplift the world of being, and are conducive to its exaltation. Knowledge is as wings to man's life, and a ladder for his ascent. Its acquisition is incumbent upon everyone. The knowledge of such sciences, however, should be acquired as can profit the peoples of the earth, and not those which begin with words and end with words. Great indeed is the claim of scientists and craftsmen on the peoples of the world. Unto this beareth witness the Mother Book in this conspicuous station." '
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 47, pp. 26-27.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The third Tajallí is concerning arts, crafts and sciences. Knowledge is as wings to man's life, and a ladder for his ascent. Its acquisition is incumbent upon everyone. The knowledge of such sciences, however, should be acquired as can profit the peoples of the earth, and not those which begin with words and end with words. Great indeed is the claim of scientists and craftsmen on the peoples of the world. Unto this beareth witness the Mother Book on the day of His return."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Tajalliyát, third Tajallí, Pages: 51-52)




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is again a nearly word-for-word quote from one of Bahá'u'lláh's previous Tablets, again from Tajalliyát. The section of the third Tajallí from which Bahá'u'lláh quotes is word-for-word the same. The only differences between the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and the third Tajallí are the absence of the first line from the third Tajallí, " Happy are those possessed of a hearing ear", in the quoted passage in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, and the complete change involving the last line of each passage.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"In truth, knowledge is a veritable treasure for man, and a source of glory, of bounty, of joy, of exaltation, of cheer and gladness unto him. Happy the man that cleaveth unto it, and woe betide the heedless."
      Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 48, p. 27.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Happy are those possessed of a hearing ear. In truth, knowledge is a veritable treasure for man, and a source of glory, of bounty, of joy, of exaltation, of cheer and gladness unto him. Thus hath the Tongue of Grandeur spoken in this Most Great Prison."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Tajalliyát, third Tajallí, Page: 52)




      Once again Bahá'u'lláh has graciously mentioned the Source of this next quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Again the changes are few and are not ones which affect the main portion of the quote. The wording of the first sentence differs slightly. After that, the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf matches word-for-word the remainder of the passage which is the first leaf of Paradise. Bahá'u'lláh then adds one additional sentence at the end of the passage quoted in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf which is not found in the first leaf of Paradise ( at least not in the English translation which we currently possess.)

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
The first word which the Abha Pen hath revealed and inscribed on the first leaf of Paradise is this: "Verily I say: The fear of God hath ever been a sure defence and a safe stronghold for all the peoples of the world. It is the chief cause of the protection of mankind, and the supreme instrument for its preservation. Indeed, there existeth in man a faculty which deterreth him from, and guardeth him against, whatever is unworthy and unseemly, and which is known as his sense of shame. This, however, is confined to but a few; all have not possessed, and do not possess, it. It is incumbent upon the kings and the spiritual leaders of the world to lay fast hold on religion, inasmuch as through it the fear of God is instilled in all else but Him."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 50, pp. 27-28.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The word of God which the Abha Pen hath revealed and inscribed on the first leaf of the Most Exalted Paradise is this: Verily I say: The fear of God hath ever been a sure defence and a safe stronghold for all the peoples of the world. It is the chief cause of the protection of mankind, and the supreme instrument for its preservation. Indeed, there existeth in man a faculty which deterreth him from, and guardeth him against, whatever is unworthy and unseemly, and which is known as his sense of shame. This, however, is confined to but a few; all have not possessed and do not possess it."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise, first leaf, Page: 63)




      Bahá'u'lláh continues to quote from His Words of Paradise Tablet, quoting the second leaf of it in this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Again, I could find only one change in wording between the two passages. In the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh shortens slightly the list of those addressed in this passage. Perhaps because of the already long length of His Tablet to the Shaykh, He may have chosen to use only the more general terms, "the kings and rulers of the earth", rather than the fuller description of "the kings, the sovereigns, the presidents, the rulers, the divines and the wise," found in the second leaf of Paradise. The remainder of the quote is again word-for-word the same all the way through the last sentence.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
The second word We have recorded on the second leaf of Paradise is the following: "The Pen of the Divine Expounder exhorteth, at this moment, the manifestations of authority and the sources of power, namely the kings and rulers of the earth—may God assist them—and enjoineth them to uphold the cause of religion, and to cleave unto it. Religion is, verily, the chief instrument for the establishment of order in the world, and of tranquillity amongst its peoples. The weakening of the pillars of religion hath strengthened the foolish, and emboldened them, and made them more arrogant. Verily I say: The greater the decline of religion, the more grievous the waywardness of the ungodly. This cannot but lead in the end to chaos and confusion. Hear Me, O men of insight, and be warned, ye who are endued with discernment!"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 51, p. 28.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The word of God which the Supreme Pen hath recorded on the second leaf of the Most Exalted Paradise is the following: The Pen of the Most High exhorteth, at this moment, the manifestations of authority and the sources of power, namely the kings, the sovereigns, the presidents, the rulers, the divines and the wise, and enjoineth them to uphold the cause of religion, and to cleave unto it. Religion is verily the chief instrument for the establishment of order in the world and of tranquillity amongst its peoples. The weakening of the pillars of religion hath strengthened the foolish and emboldened them and made them more arrogant. Verily I say: The greater the decline of religion, the more grievous the waywardness of the ungodly. This cannot but lead in the end to chaos and confusion. Hear Me, O men of insight, and be warned, ye who are endued with discernment!"
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise, second leaf, Pages: 63-64.)




      Bahá'u'lláh lists His Source for this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf as "the Book of Utterance." I do not know what this Book may be, but I found only one other source of this passage. This is in a compilation on trustworthiness. While I cannot be certain that Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is not itself the source for this section from the compilation, I suspect a different source since the two passages are not of the same length, This difference in length, caused by the additions of small passages at the beginning and at the end of the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, are the most obvious changes between these two passages.

      The next change is the wording of the first sentence of the quoted portions of these passages. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh writes, "Cling ye to the hem of virtue, and hold fast to the cord of trustworthiness and piety." However, the passage taken from the compilation on trustworthiness reads "Cleave ye to the hem of the raiment of virtue and keep fast hold of the cord of piety and trustworthiness."

      There seem to be changes in wording in every sentence of these passages. Therefore, instead of listing them all here, I encourage you to study carefully these two passages yourself.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      In the Book of Utterance these exalted words have been written down and recorded: "Say, O friends! Strive that haply the tribulations suffered by this Wronged One and by you, in the path of God, may not prove to have been in vain.
      Cling ye to the hem of virtue, and hold fast to the cord of trustworthiness and piety. Concern yourselves with the things that benefit mankind, and not with your corrupt and selfish desires. O ye followers of this Wronged One! Ye are the shepherds of mankind; liberate ye your flocks from the wolves of evil passions and desires, and adorn them with the ornament of the fear of God. This is the firm commandment which hath, at this moment, flowed out from the Pen of Him Who is the Ancient of Days. By the righteousness of God! The sword of a virtuous character and upright conduct is sharper than blades of steel. The voice of the true Faith calleth aloud, at this moment, and saith: O people!
      Verily, the Day is come, and My Lord hath made Me to shine forth with a light whose splendor hath eclipsed the suns of utterance. Fear ye the Merciful, and be not of them that have gone astray."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 53, p. 29.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Cleave ye to the hem of the raiment of virtue and keep fast hold of the cord of piety and trustworthiness. Have regard to the good of the world and not to your own selfish desires. O people of God! Ye are the shepherds of the world. Keep ye your flocks unbesmirched by the mire of evil passion and desire, and adorn each one with the ornament of the fear of God. This is the firm command that hath issued forth in this day from the pen of the Ever-Abiding. I swear by the righteousness of God! The sword of upright conduct and a goodly character is sharper than blades of steel."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Compilation on Trustworthiness, No. 2030, Page: 331)




      Bahá'u'lláh again returns to His Words of Paradise Tablet for the Source for this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Again, there is no change that I can find in the wording between these two passages. However, one point of interest which should be noted, which sets this passage apart from the others is that this passage contains an additional quotation from yet another Tablet.

      I can find only one difference between this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and its Source in the Words of Paradise Tablet, aside from paragraph formatting which is most likely a difference in translation. The passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf omits the phrase "O people of God!" which immediately precedes "Great is the Day and mighty the Call! In the third leaf from the Words of Paradise.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      The third word we have recorded on the third leaf of Paradise is this: "O son of man! If thine eyes be turned towards mercy, forsake the things that profit thee, and cleave unto that which will profit mankind. And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbor that which thou choosest for thyself. Humility exalteth man to the heaven of glory and power, whilst pride abaseth him to the depths of wretchedness and degradation. Great is the Day, and mighty the Call! In one of Our Tablets We have revealed these exalted words: 'Were the world of the spirit to be wholly converted into the sense of hearing, it could then claim to be worthy to hearken unto the Voice that calleth from the Supreme Horizon; for otherwise, these ears that are defiled with lying tales have never been, nor are they now, fit to hear it.' Well is it with them that hearken; and woe betide the wayward."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 54, pp. 29-30.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      The word of God which the Supreme Pen hath recorded on the third leaf of the Most Exalted Paradise is this: O son of man! If thine eyes be turned towards mercy, forsake the things that profit thee and cleave unto that which will profit mankind. And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself. Humility exalteth man to the heaven of glory and power, whilst pride abaseth him to the depths of wretchedness and degradation.
      O people of God! Great is the Day and mighty the Call! In one of Our Tablets We have revealed these exalted words: 'Were the world of the spirit to be wholly converted into the sense of hearing, it could then claim to be worthy to hearken unto the Voice that calleth from the Supreme Horizon; for otherwise, these ears that are defiled with lying tales have never been, nor are they now, fit to hear it.' Well is it with them that hearken; and woe betide the wayward.

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Words of Paradise, third leaf, Pages: 64-65)




      I could not find the original Source for this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. I am not even certain that it was meant as a quote, since, unlike the other quotes, the quotation marks are absent. However, this passage seemed so familiar that I decided to look for a matching passage from some of His earlier Writings. I could not find an exact quote, but present for your consideration the fifth and sixth glad-Tidings which deal with the same subjects.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
We pray God—exalted be His glory—and cherish the hope that He may graciously assist the manifestations of affluence and power and the daysprings of sovereignty and glory, the kings of the earth—may God aid them through His strengthening grace—to establish the Lesser Peace. This, indeed, is the greatest means for insuring the tranquillity of the nations. It is incumbent upon the Sovereigns of the world—may God assist them—unitedly to hold fast unto this Peace, which is the chief instrument for the protection of all mankind. It is Our hope that they will arise to achieve what will be conducive to the well-being of man. It is their duty to convene an all-inclusive assembly, which either they themselves or their ministers will attend, and to enforce whatever measures are required to establish unity and concord amongst men. They must put away the weapons of war, and turn to the instruments of universal reconstruction. Should one king rise up against another, all the other kings must arise to deter him. Arms and armaments will, then, be no more needed beyond that which is necessary to insure the internal security of their respective countries. If they attain unto this all-surpassing blessing, the people of each nation will pursue, with tranquillity and contentment, their own occupations, and the groanings and lamentations of most men would be silenced. We beseech God to aid them to do His will and pleasure. He, verily, is the Lord of the throne on high and of earth below, and the Lord of this world and of the world to come. It would be preferable and more fitting that the highly honored kings themselves should attend such an assembly, and proclaim their edicts. Any king who will arise and carry out this task, he verily will, inthe sight of God, become the cynosure of all kings. Happy is he, and great is his blessedness!
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 55, pp. 30-31.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The sixth Glad-Tidings is the establishment of the Lesser Peace, details of which have formerly been revealed from Our Most Exalted Pen. Great is the blessedness of him who upholdeth it and observeth whatsoever hath been ordained by God, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise."
      (Bahá'u'lláh,Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Bishárát, 6th Glad-Tiding, Page: 23)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"The fifth Glad-Tidings
      In every country where any of this people reside, they must behave towards the government of that country with loyalty, honesty and truthfulness. This is that which hath been revealed at the behest of Him Who is the Ordainer, the Ancient of Days.
      It is binding and incumbent upon the peoples of the world, one and all, to extend aid unto this momentous Cause which is come from the heaven of the Will of the ever-abiding God, that perchance the fire of animosity which blazeth in the hearts of some of the peoples of the earth may, through the living waters of divine wisdom and by virtue of heavenly counsels and exhortations, be quenched, and the light of unity and concord may shine forth and shed its radiance upon the world.
      We cherish the hope that through the earnest endeavours of such as are the exponents of the power of God - exalted be His glory - the weapons of war throughout the world may be converted into instruments of reconstruction and that strife and conflict may be removed from the midst of men."

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Bishárát, 5th Glad-Tiding, Page: 23)




      This next quote again has no exact parallel that I could find. However, it is very reminiscent of paragraph 50 from The Most Holy Book and may be an inexact quote of that paragraph from The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, which is presented here as erll as the quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Seize ye the living waters of immortality in the name of your Lord, the Lord of all names, and drink ye in the remembrance of Him, Who is the Mighty, the Peerless."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 63, p. 38.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Beware lest ye be hindered by the veils of glory from partaking of the crystal waters of this living Fountain. Seize ye the chalice of salvation at this dawntide in the name of Him Who causeth the day to break, and drink your fill in praise of Him Who is the All-Glorious, the Incomparable."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 50, Page: 38)




      This next quoted passage is once again taken from the Lawh-i-Sultán. There are only a few changes in wording that I could find between these two passages, as follows:

      The first change in wording that I found was the combining into one word the words "any one" from the Lawh-i-Sultán into one word "anyone" in the corresponding passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      Second, when referring to Himself in the Lawh-i-Sultán, Bahá'u'lláh uses the word "Youth"; in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He uses the phrase "Wronged One". However, the next time Bahá'u'lláh refers to Himself as "Youth" in the Lawh-i-Sultán, He also uses the same word, "Youth" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      Third and last: the phrase, "Wert thou to incline thine ears unto the shrill voice of the Pen of Glory" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf does not contain the word "voice" in the Lawh-i-Sultán.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      We once again refer unto some of the sublime words revealed in the Tablet to His Majesty the Shah, so that thou mayest know of a certainty that whatever hath been mentioned hath come from God: "O King! I was but a man like others, asleep upon My couch, when lo, the breezes of the All-Glorious were wafted over Me, and taught Me the knowledge of all that hath been. This thing is not from Me, but from One Who is Almighty and All-Knowing. And He bade Me lift up My voice between earth and heaven, and for this there befell Me what hath caused the tears of every man of understanding to flow. The learning current amongst men I studied not; their schools I entered not. Ask of the city wherein I dwelt, that thou mayest be well assured that I am not of them who speak falsely. This is but a leaf which the winds of the will of thy Lord, the Almighty, the All-Praised, have stirred. Can it be still when the tempestuous winds are blowing? Nay, by Him Who is the Lord of all Names and Attributes! They move it as they list. The evanescent is as nothing before Him Who is the Ever-Abiding. His all-compelling summons hath reached Me, and caused Me to speak His praise amidst all people. I was indeed as one dead when His behest was uttered. The hand of the will of thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Merciful, transformed Me. Can anyone speak forth of his own accord that for which all men, both high and low, will protest against him? Nay, by Him Who taught the Pen the eternal mysteries, save him whom the grace of the Almighty, the All-Powerful, hath strengthened.
      "Look upon this Wronged One, O King, with the eyes of justice; judge thou, then, with truth concerning what hath befallen Him. Of a verity, God hath made thee His shadow amongst men, and the sign of His power unto all that dwell on earth. Judge thou between Us and them that have wronged Us without proof and without an enlightening Book. They that surround thee love thee for their own sakes, whereas this Youth loveth thee for thine own sake, and hath had no desire except to draw thee nigh unto the seat of grace, and to turn thee toward the right-hand of justice. Thy Lord beareth witness unto that which I declare.
      "O King! Wert thou to incline thine ears unto the shrill voice of the Pen of Glory and the cooing of the Dove of Eternity, which on the branches of the Lote-Tree beyond which there is no passing, uttereth praises to God, the Maker of all Names and the Creator of earth and heaven, thou wouldst attain unto a station from which thou wouldst behold in the world of being naught save the effulgence of the Adored One, and wouldst regard thy sovereignty as the most contemptible of thy possessions, abandoning it to whosoever might desire it, and setting thy face toward the Horizon aglow with the light of His countenance. Neither wouldst thou ever be willing to bear the burden of dominion save for the purpose of helping thy Lord, the Exalted, the Most High. Then would the Concourse on high bless thee. O how excellent is this most sublime station, couldst thou ascend thereunto through the power of a sovereignty recognized as derived from the Name of God!"

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 65-67, pp. 39-41.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      O King! I was but a man like others, asleep upon My couch, when lo, the breezes of the All-Glorious were wafted over Me, and taught Me the knowledge of all that hath been. This thing is not from Me, but from One Who is Almighty and All-Knowing. And He bade Me lift up My voice between earth and heaven, and for this there befell Me what hath caused the tears of every man of understanding to flow. The learning current amongst men I studied not; their schools I entered not. Ask of the city wherein I dwelt, that thou mayest be well assured that I am not of them who speak falsely. This is but a leaf which the winds of the will of thy Lord, the Almighty, the All-Praised, have stirred.
      Can it be still when the tempestuous winds are blowing? Nay, by Him Who is the Lord of all Names and Attributes! They move it as they list. The evanescent is as nothing before Him Who is the Ever-Abiding. His all-compelling summons hath reached Me, and caused Me to speak His praise amidst all people. I was indeed as one dead when His behest was uttered. The hand of the will of thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Merciful, transformed Me. Can any one speak forth of his own accord that for which all men, both high and low, will protest against him? Nay, by Him Who taught the Pen the eternal mysteries, save him whom the grace of the Almighty, the All-Powerful, hath strengthened. The Pen of the Most High addresseth Me saying: Fear not. Relate unto His Majesty the Shah that which befell thee. His heart, verily, is between the fingers of thy Lord, the God of Mercy, that haply the sun of justice and bounty may shine forth above the horizon of his heart. Thus hath the decree been irrevocably fixed by Him Who is the All-Wise.
      Look upon this Youth, O King, with the eyes of justice; judge thou, then, with truth concerning what hath befallen Him. Of a verity, God hath made thee His shadow amongst men, and the sign of His power unto all that dwell on earth.
      Judge thou between Us and them that have wronged Us without proof and without an enlightening Book. They that surround thee love thee for their own sakes, whereas this Youth loveth thee for thine own sake, and hath had no desire except to draw thee nigh unto the seat of grace, and to turn thee toward the right-hand of justice. Thy Lord beareth witness unto that which I declare.
      O King! Wert thou to incline thine ear unto the shrill of the Pen of Glory and the cooing of the Dove of Eternity which, on the branches of the Lote-Tree beyond which there is no passing, uttereth praises to God, the Maker of all names and Creator of earth and heaven, thou wouldst attain unto a station from which thou wouldst behold in the world of being naught save the effulgence of the Adored One, and wouldst regard thy sovereignty as the most contemptible of thy possessions, abandoning it to whosoever might desire it, and setting thy face toward the Horizon aglow with the light of His countenance. Neither wouldst thou ever be willing to bear the burden of dominion save for the purpose of helping thy Lord, the Exalted, the Most High. Then would the Concourse on high bless thee. O how excellent is this most sublime station, couldst thou ascend thereunto through the power of a sovereignty recognized as derived from the Name of God!...
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Lawh-i-Sultán, Pages: 56-59)




      For this next quote, I was only able to find the first sentance which bears witness to the unity of God. This was rvealed by the Blessed Beauty in the Medium Obligatory Prayer.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"I bear witness to Thy unity and Thy oneness, and that Thou art God, and that there is none other God but Thee. Thou hast everlastingly been sanctified above the mention of any one but Thee and the praise of all else except Thyself, and Thou wilt everlastingly continue to be the same as Thou wast from the beginning and hast ever been. I beseech Thee, O King of Eternity, by the Most Great Name, and by the effulgences of the Daystar of Thy Revelation upon the Sinai of Utterance, and by the billows of the Ocean of Thy knowledge among all created things, to graciously assist Me in that which will draw Me nigh unto Thee, and will detach Me from all except Thee. By Thy glory, O Lord of all being, and the Desire of all creation! I would love to lay My face upon every single spot of Thine earth, that perchance it might be honored by touching a spot ennobled by the footsteps of Thy loved ones!"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 74, pp. 43-44.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Let him, then, be seated and say:
"I bear witness to Thy unity and Thy oneness, and that Thou art God, and that there is none other God beside Thee. ..."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Kitáb-i-Aqdas: Other Sections, Medium Obligatory Prayer, Page: 100.)




      This next lengthy passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh precedes with the following (from pages 45-46 of that Tablet): "We, therefore, revealed in his (Napoleon III's) name verses in the Suratu'l-Haykal, some of which We now quote, that thou mayest know that the Cause of this Wronged One hath been revealed for the sake of God, and hath come from Him: ". Though most of this passage is taken from Bahá'u'lláh 's second Tablet to Napoleon III, He also inserts, in the midst of this quote from His Tablet to Napoleon III, a section of His Tablet(s) to the Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths. Therefore, I have included both quotes. Immediately following the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is the quoted passage(s) from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Napoleon III, followed by the passage from the quoted section of His Tablet(s) to the Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths. This insertion of a passage from another Tablet in the midst of the one from which He was primarily quoting is the only major change. The other changes. listed below. are again minor ones, with most of the quoted passages being, once again, word-for-word the same.

      The first change in wording occurs in the passage taken from His Tablet(s) to the Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths. In the passage from Epistle to theSon of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh begins this quote with "Say:" which is not included in the passage from His Tablet(s) to the Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths.

      The second change is again in that passage. In the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh writes: "Seclude not yourselves in your churches and cloisters." In the passage from His Tablet(s) to the Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths, He does not include the word "your", but rather writes only "in churches and cloisters."

      There are many changes in wording between these two passages: words added or omitted, or a change in how He phrases things. Rather than list all of these changes in wording between these two passages, I encourage the reader to carefully study these two passages for him/herself.

      I could find no changes in wording in the sections quoted from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Napoleon III.

      It may be enlightening and beneficial to ponder why the Blessed Beauty inserted this extra quote, in which He addresses the monks, where He did in the quote from His Tablet to Napoleon III.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "O King of Paris! Tell the priest to ring the bells no longer. By God, the True One! The Most Mighty Bell hath ppeared in the form of Him Who is the Most Great Name, and the fingers of the will of Thy Lord, the Most Exalted, the Most High, toll it out in the heaven of Immortality, in His name, the All-Glorious. Thus have the mighty verses of Thy Lord been again sent down unto thee, that thou mayest arise to remember God, the Creator of earth and heaven, in these days when all the tribes of the earth have mourned, and the foundations of the cities have trembled, and the dust of irreligion hath enwrapped all men, except such as God, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise, was pleased to spare. Say: He Who is the Unconditioned is come, in the clouds of light, that He may quicken all created things with the breezes of His Name, the Most Merciful, and unify the world, and gather all men around this Table which hath been sent down from heaven. Beware that ye deny not the favor of God after it hath been sent down unto you. Better is this for you than that which ye possess; for that which is yours perisheth, whilst that which is with God endureth. He, in truth, ordaineth what He pleaseth. Verily, the breezes of forgiveness have been wafted from the direction of your Lord, the God of Mercy; whoso turneth thereunto, shall be cleansed of his sins, and of all pain and sickness. Happy the man that hath turned towards them, and woe betide him that hath turned aside.
      "Wert thou to incline thine inner ear unto all created things, thou wouldst hear: 'The Ancient of Days is come in His great glory!' Everything celebrateth the praise of its Lord. Some have known God and remember Him; others remember Him, yet know Him not. Thus have We set down Our decree in a perspicuous Tablet.
      "Give ear, O King, unto the Voice that calleth from the Fire which burneth in this verdant Tree, on this Sinai which hath been raised above the hallowed and snow-white Spot, beyond the Everlasting City; 'Verily, there is none other God but Me, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Merciful!' We, in truth, have sent Him Whom We aided with the Holy Spirit (Jesus Christ) that He may announce unto you this Light that hath shone forth from the horizon of the will of your Lord, the Most Exalted, the All-Glorious, and Whose signs have been revealed in the West. Set your faces towards Him (Bahá'u'lláh), on this Day which God hath exalted above all other days, and whereon the All-Merciful hath shed the splendor of His effulgent glory upon all who are in heaven and all who are on earth. Arise thou to serve God and help His Cause. He, verily, will assist thee with the hosts of the seen and unseen, and will set thee king over all that whereon the sun riseth. Thy Lord, in truth, is the All-Powerful, the Almighty.
      "The breezes of the Most Merciful have passed over all created things; happy the man that hath discovered their fragrance, and set himself towards them with a sound heart. Attire thy temple with the ornament of My Name, an d thy tongue with remembrance of Me, and thine heart with love for Me, the Almighty, the Most High. We have desired for thee naught except that which is better for thee than what thou dost possess and all the treasures of the earth.
      Thy Lord, verily, is knowing, informed of all. Arise, in My Name, amongst My servants, and say: 'O ye peoples of the earth! Turn yourselves towards Him Who hath turned towards you. He, verily, is the Face of God amongst you, and His Testimony and His Guide unto you. He hath come to you with signs which none can produce.' The voice of the Burning Bush is raised in the midmost heart of the world, and the Holy Spirit calleth aloud among the nations: 'Lo, the Desired One is come with manifest dominion!'
      "O King! The stars of the heaven of knowledge have fallen, they who seek to establish the truth of My Cause through the things they possess, and who make mention of God in My Name. And yet, when I came unto them in My glory, they turned aside. They, indeed, are of the fallen. This is, truly, that which the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ) hath announced, when He came with truth unto you, He with Whom the Jewish doctors disputed, till at last they perpetrated what hath made the Holy Spirit to lament, and the tears of them that have near access to God to flow.
      "Say: O concourse of monks! Seclude not yourselves in your churches and cloisters. Come ye out of them by My leave, and busy, then, yourselves with what will profit you and others. Thus commandeth you He Who is the Lord of the Day of Reckoning. Seclude yourselves in the stronghold of My love. This, truly, is the seclusion that befitteth you, could ye but know it. He that secludeth himself in his house is indeed as one dead. It behooveth man to show forth that which will benefit mankind. He that bringeth forth no fruit is fit for the fire. Thus admonisheth you your Lord; He, verily, is the Mighty, the Bountiful. Enter ye into wedlock, that after you another may arise in your stead. We, verily, have forbidden you lechery, and not that which is conducive to fidelity. Have ye clung unto the promptings of your nature, and cast behind your backs the statutes of God? Fear ye God, and be not of the foolish. But for man, who, on My earth, would remember Me, and how could My attributes and My names be revealed? Reflect, and be not of them that have shut themselves out as by a veil from Him, and were of those that are fast asleep. He that married not (Jesus Christ) could find no place wherein to abide, nor where to lay His head, by reason of what the hands of the treacherous had wrought. His holiness consisted not in the things ye have believed and imagined, but rather in the things which belong unto Us. Ask, that ye may be made aware of His station which hath been exalted above the vain imaginings of all the peoples of the earth. Blessed are they that understand.
      "O King! We heard the words thou didst utter in answer to the Czar of Russia, concerning the decision made regarding the war (Crimean War). Thy Lord, verily, knoweth, is informed of all. Thou didst say: 'I lay asleep upon my couch, when the cry of the oppressed, who were drowned in the Black Sea, wakened me.' This is what We heard thee say, and, verily, thy Lord is witness unto what I say. We testify that that which wakened thee was not their cry but the promptings of thine own passions, for We tested thee, and found thee wanting. Comprehend the meaning of My words, and be thou of the discerning. It is not Our wish to address thee words of condemnation, out of regard for the dignity We conferred upon thee in this mortal life. We, verily, have chosen courtesy, and made it the true mark of such as are nigh unto Him. Courtesy is, in truth, a raiment which fitteth all men, whether young or old. Well is it with him that adorneth his temple therewith, and woe unto him who is deprived of this great bounty. Hadst thou been sincere in thy words, thou wouldst have not cast behind thy back the Book of God, when it was sent unto thee by Him Who is the Almighty, the All-Wise. We have proved thee through it, and found thee other than that which thou didst profess. Arise, and make amends for that which escaped thee. Erelong the world and all that thou possessest will perish, and the kingdom will remain unto God, thy Lord and the Lord of thy fathers of old. It behooveth thee not to conduct thine affairs according to the dictates of thy desires. Fear the sighs of this Wronged One, and shield Him from the darts of such as act unjustly.
      "For what thou hast done, thy kingdom shall be thrown into confusion, and thine empire shall pass from thine hands, as a punishment for that which thou hast wrought. Then wilt thou know how thou hast plainly erred. Commotions shall seize all the people in that land, unless thou arisest to help this Cause, and followest Him Who is the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ) in this, the Straight Path. Hath thy pomp made thee proud? By My Life! It shall not endure; nay, it shall soon pass away, unless thou holdest fast by this firm Cord. We see abasement hastening after thee, whilst thou art of the heedless. It behooveth thee when thou hearest His Voice calling from the seat of glory to cast away all that thou possessest, and cry out: 'Here am I, O Lord of all that is in heaven and all that is on earth!'
      "O King! We were in Iraq, when the hour of parting arrived. At the bidding of the King of Islam (Sultan of Turkey) We set Our steps in his direction. Upon Our arrival, there befell Us at the hands of the malicious that which the books of the world can never adequately recount. Thereupon the inmates of Paradise, and they that dwell within the retreat of holiness, lamented; and yet the people are wrapped in a thick veil!"

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 78-86, pp. 46-52.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      O King of Paris! Tell the priest to ring the bells no longer. By God, the True One! The Most Mighty Bell hath appeared in the form of Him Who is the Most Great Name, and the fingers of the will of Thy Lord, the Most Exalted, the Most High, toll it out in the heaven of Immortality, in His name, the All-Glorious. Thus have the mighty verses of Thy Lord been again sent down unto thee, that thou mayest arise to remember God, the Creator of earth and heaven, in these days when all the tribes of the earth have mourned, and the foundations of the cities have trembled, and the dust of irreligion hath enwrapped all men, except such as God, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise, was pleased to spare. Say: He Who is the Unconditioned is come, in the clouds of light, that He may quicken all created things with the breeze of His Name, the Most Merciful, and unify the world, and gather all men around this Table which hath been sent down from heaven. Beware that ye deny not the favour of God after it hath been sent down unto you. Better is this for you than that which ye possess; for that which is yours perisheth, whilst that which is with God endureth. He, in truth, ordaineth what He pleaseth. Verily, the breezes of forgiveness have been wafted from the direction of your Lord, the God of Mercy; whoso turneth thereunto, shall be cleansed of his sins, and of all pain and sickness. Happy the man that hath turned towards them, and woe betide him that hath turned aside.
      Wert thou to incline thine inner ear unto all created things, thou wouldst hear: 'The Ancient of Days is come in His great glory!' Everything celebrateth the praise of its Lord. Some have known God and remember Him; others remember Him, yet know Him not. Thus have We set down Our decree in a perspicuous Tablet.
      Give ear, O King, unto the Voice that calleth from the Fire which burneth in this verdant Tree, on this Sinai which hath been raised above the hallowed and snow-white Spot, beyond the Everlasting City: 'Verily, there is none other God but Me, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Merciful!' We, in truth, have sent Him Whom We aided with the Holy Spirit (Jesus Christ) that He may announce unto you this Light that hath shone forth from the horizon of the will of your Lord, the Most Exalted, the All-Glorious, and Whose signs have been revealed in the West. Set your faces towards Him (Bahá'u'lláh) on this Day which God hath exalted above all other days, and whereon the All-Merciful hath shed the splendour of His effulgent glory upon all who are in heaven and all who are on earth. Arise thou to serve God and help His Cause. He, verily, will assist thee with the hosts of the seen and unseen, and will set thee king over all that whereon the sun riseth. Thy Lord, in truth, is the All-Powerful, the Almighty.
      The breezes of the Most Merciful have passed over all created things; happy the man that hath discovered their fragrance, and set himself towards them with a sound heart. Attire thy temple with the ornament of My Name, and thy tongue with remembrance of Me, and thine heart with love for Me, the Almighty, the Most High. We have desired for thee naught except that which is better for thee than what thou dost possess and all the treasures of the earth.
      Thy Lord, verily, is knowing, informed of all. Arise, in My Name, amongst My servants, and say: 'O ye peoples of the earth! Turn yourselves towards Him Who hath turned towards you. He, verily, is the Face of God amongst you, an d His Testimony and His Guide unto you. He hath come to you with signs which none can produce.' The voice of the Burning Bush is raised in the midmost heart of the world, and the Holy Spirit calleth aloud among the nations: 'Lo, the Desired One is come with manifest dominion!'
      O King! The stars of the heaven of knowledge have fallen, they who seek to establish the truth of My Cause through the things they possess, and who make mention of God in My Name. And yet, when I came unto them in My glory, they turned aside. They, indeed, are of the fallen. This is, truly, that which the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ) hath announced, when He came with truth unto you, He with Whom the Jewish doctors disputed, till at last they perpetrated what hath made the Holy Spirit to lament, and the tears of them that have near access to God to flow....
      O King! We heard the words thou didst utter in answer to the Czar of Russia, concerning the decision made regarding the war (Crimean War). Thy Lord, verily, knoweth, is informed of all. Thou didst say: 'I lay asleep upon my couch, when the cry of the oppressed, who were drowned in the Black Sea, wakened me.' This is what we heard thee say, and, verily, thy Lord is witness unto what I say. We testify that that which wakened thee was not their cry but the promptings of thine own passions, for We tested thee, and found thee wanting. Comprehend the meaning of My words, and be thou of the discerning. It is not Our wish to address thee words of condemnation, out of regard for the dignity We conferred upon thee in this mortal life. We, verily, have chosen courtesy, and made it the true mark of such as are nigh unto Him. Courtesy, is, in truth, a raiment which fitteth all men, whether young or old. Well is it with him that adorneth his temple therewith, and woe unto him who is deprived of this great bounty. Hadst thou been sincere in thy words, thou wouldst have not cast behind thy back the Book of God, when it was sent unto thee by Him Who is the Almighty, the All-Wise. We have proved thee through it, and found thee other than that which thou didst profess. Arise, and make amends for that which escaped thee. Ere long the world and all that thou possessest will perish, and the kingdom will remain unto God, thy Lord and the Lord of thy fathers of old. It behoveth thee not to conduct thine affairs according to the dictates of thy desires. Fear the sighs of this Wronged One, and shield Him from the darts of such as act unjustly.
      For what thou hast done, thy kingdom shall be thrown into confusion, and thine empire shall pass from thine hands, as a punishment for that which thou hast wrought. Then wilt thou know how thou hast plainly erred. Commotions shall seize all the people in that land, unless thou arisest to help this Cause, and followest Him Who is the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ) in this, the Straight Path. Hath thy pomp made thee proud? By My Life! It shall not endure; nay, it shall soon pass away, unless thou holdest fast by this firm Cord. We see abasement hastening after thee, whilst thou art of the heedless. It behoveth thee when thou hearest His Voice calling from the seat of glory to cast away all that thou ossessest, and cry out: 'Here am I, O Lord of all that is in heaven and all that is on earth!'
      O King! We were in Iraq, when the hour of parting arrived. At the bidding of the King of Islam (Sultan of Turkey) We set Our steps in his direction. Upon Our arrival, there befell Us at the hands of the malicious that which the books of the world can never adequately recount. Thereupon the inmates of Paradise, and they that dwell within the retreats of holiness, lamented; and yet the people are wrapped in a thick veil!...

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Napoleon III, Pages: 17-21)

Passage from Earlier Source:
      O concourse of monks! Seclude not yourselves in churches and cloisters. Come forth by My leave, and occupy yourselves with that which will profit your souls and the souls of men. Thus biddeth you the King of the Day of Reckoning. Seclude yourselves in the stronghold of My love. This, verily, is a befitting seclusion, were ye of them that perceive it. He that shutteth himself up in a house is indeed as one dead. It behoveth man to show forth that which will profit all created things, and he that bringeth forth no fruit is fit for fire. Thus counselleth you your Lord, and He, verily, is the Almighty, the All-Bounteous. Enter ye into wedlock, that after you someone may fill your place. We have forbidden you perfidious acts, and not that which will demonstrate fidelity. Have ye clung to the standards fixed by your own selves, and cast the standards of God behind your standards fixed by your own selves, and cast the standards of God behind your backs? Fear God, and be not of the foolish. But for man, who would make mention of Me on My earth, and how could My attributes and My name have been revealed? Ponder ye, and be not of them that are veiled and fast asleep. He that wedded not (Jesus) found no place wherein to dwell or lay His head, by reason of that which the hands of the treacherous had wrought. His sanctity consisteth not in that which ye believe or fancy, but rather in the things We possess. Ask, that ye may apprehend His station which hath been exalted above the imaginings of all that dwell on earth. Blessed are they who perceive it.
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, To The Clergy and Peoples of Various Faiths, Pages: 95-96)




      It seems that Bahá'u'lláh has finished quoting His Tablet to Napoleon III in these next five paragraphs. As you may note when comparing it to the rest of the Tablet to Napoleon III presented after the quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, there are some paragraphs inserted in the quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf that are not included in His Tablet to Napoleon III. I attribute this to an incomplete translation of His Tablet to Napoleon III. I believe, however, that all of these paragraphs wre indeed included in His Tablet to Napoleon III since Bahá'u'lláh mentions this Tablet as His Source before He begins quoting it in paragraph 78, and these subsequent passages are all preceeded with the words: "And further We have said:" which indicates to me that He was continuing to quote from the same Tablet. Also, the added paragraphs are all preceeded and/or followed by already translated portions of this Tablet. In addition, in the Tablet quoted from The Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, notice the triple dots at the end of the paragraphs corresponding to paragraphs 87 and 90 indicating that there is more following that paragraph. Therefore, until we are blessed with a fuller translation into English of Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Napoleon III, this may be the only Source we have of the full Tablet written to the Emperor of France. Also please note that the portions which I have located from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Napoleon III are all almost word-for-word the same as the quote from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      'And further We have said: "More grievous became Our plight from day to day, nay, from hour to hour, until they took Us forth from Our prison and made Us, with glaring injustice, enter the Most Great Prison. And if anyone ask them: 'For what crime were they imprisoned?' they would answer and say: 'They, verily, sought to supplant the Faith with a new religion!' If that which is ancient be what ye prefer, wherefore, then, have ye discarded that which hath been set down in the Torah and the Evangel? Clear it up, O men! By My life! There is no place for you to flee to in this day. If this be My crime, then Muhammad, the Apostle of God, committed it before Me, and before Him He Who was the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ), and yet earlier He Who conversed with God (Moses). And if My sin be this, that I have exalted the Word of God and revealed His Cause, then indeed am I the greatest of sinners! Such a sin I will not barter for the kingdoms of earth and heaven."
      'And further We have said: "As My tribulations multiplied, so did My love for God and for His Cause increase, in such wise that all that befell Me from the hosts of the wayward was powerless to deter Me from My purpose. Should they hide Me away in the depths of the earth, yet would they find Me riding aloft on the clouds, and calling out unto God, the Lord of strength and of might. I have offered Myself up in the way of God, and I yearn after tribulations in My love for Him, and for the sake of His good pleasure. Unto this bear witness the woes which now afflict Me, the like of which no other man hath suffered. Every single hair of Mine head calleth out that which the Burning Bush uttered on Sinai, and each vein of My body invoketh God and saith: 'O would I had been severed in Thy path, so that the world might be quickened, and all its peoples be united!' Thus hath it been decreed by Him Who is the All-Knowing, the All-Informed.
      'Know of a truth that your subjects are God's trust amongst you. Watch ye, therefore, over them as ye watch over your own selves. Beware that ye allow not wolves to become the shepherds of the fold, or pride and conceit to deter you from turning unto the poor and the desolate. Arise thou, in My name, above the horizon of renunciation, and set, then, thy face towards the Kingdom, at the bidding of thy Lord, the Lord of strength and of might."
      'And further We have said: "Adorn the body of Thy kingdom with the raiment of My name, and arise, then, to teach My Cause. Better is this for thee than that which thou possessest. God will, thereby, exalt thy name among all the kings. Potent is He over all things. Walk thou amongst men in the name of God, and by the power of His might, that thou mayest show forth His signs amidst the peoples of the earth."
      'And further We have said: "Doth it behoove you to relate yourselves to Him Who is the God of mercy, and yet commit the things which the Evil One hath committed? Nay, by the Beauty of Him Who is the All-Glorified! could ye but know it. Purge your hearts from love of the world, and your tongues from calumny, and your limbs from whatsoever may withhold you from drawing nigh unto God, the Mighty, the All-Praised. Say: By the world is meant that which turneth you aside from Him Who is the Dawning-Place of Revelation, and inclineth you unto that which is unprofitable unto you. Verily, the thing that deterreth you, in this day, from God is worldliness in its essence. Eschew it, and approach the Most Sublime Vision, this shining and resplendent Seat. Shed not the blood of anyone, O people, neither judge ye anyone unjustly. Thus have ye been commanded by Him Who knoweth, Who is informed of all. They that commit disorders in the land after it hath been well ordered, these indeed have outstepped the bounds that have been set in the Book. Wretched shall be the abode of the transgressors!"
      'And further We have said: "Deal not treacherously with the substance of your neighbor. Be ye trustworthy on earth, and withhold not from the poor the things given unto you by God through His grace. He, verily, will bestow upon you the double of what ye possess. He, in truth, is the All-Bounteous, the Most Generous. O people of Baha! Subdue the citadels of men's hearts with the swords of wisdom and of utterance. They that dispute, as prompted by their desires, are indeed wrapped in a palpable veil. Say: The sword of wisdom is hotter than summer heat, and sharper than blades of steel, if ye do but understand. Draw it forth in My name and through the power of My might, and conquer, then, with it the cities of the hearts of them that have secluded themselves in the stronghold of their corrupt desires. Thus biddeth you the Pen of the All-Glorious, whilst seated beneath the swords of the wayward. If ye become aware of a sin committed by another, conceal it, that God may conceal your own sin. He, verily, is the Concealer, the Lord of grace abounding. O ye rich ones on earth! If ye encounter one who is poor, treat him not disdainfully. Reflect upon that whereof ye were created. Every one of you was created of a sorry germ."
      'And further We have said: "Regard ye the world as a man's body, which is afflicted with divers ailments, and the recovery of which dependeth upon the harmonizing of all of its component elements. Gather ye around that which We have prescribed unto you, and walk not in the ways of such as create dissension. Meditate on the world and the state of its people. He, for Whose sake the world was called into being, hath been imprisoned in the most desolate of cities (Akká), by reason of that which the hands of the wayward have wrought. From the horizon of His prison-city He summoneth mankind unto the Dayspring of God, the Exalted, the Great. Exultest thou over the treasures thou dost possess, knowing they shall perish? Rejoicest thou in that thou rulest a span of earth, when the whole world, in the estimation of the people of Baha, is worth as much as the black in the eye of a dead ant? Abandon it unto such as have set their affections upon it, and turn thou unto Him Who is the Desire of the world. Whither are gone the proud and their palaces? Gaze thou into their tombs, that thou mayest profit by this example, inasmuch as We made it a lesson unto every beholder. Were the breezes of Revelation to seize thee, thou wouldst flee the world, and turn unto the Kingdom, and wouldst expend all thou possessest, that thou mayest draw nigh unto this sublime Vision." '

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 87-93, pp. 52-56.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      'More grievous became Our plight from day to day, nay, from hour to hour, until they took Us forth from Our prison and made Us, with glaring injustice, enter the Most Great Prison....
      'Know of a truth that your subjects are God's trust amongst you. Watch ye, therefore, over them as ye watch over your own selves. Beware that ye allow not wolves to become the shepherds of the fold, or pride and conceit to deter you from turning unto the poor and the desolate. Arise thou, in My name, above the horizon of renunciation, and set, then, thy face towards the Kingdom, at the bidding of thy Lord, the Lord of strength and of might.
      'Adorn the body of Thy kingdom with the raiment of My name, and arise, then, to teach My Cause. Better is this for thee than that which thou possessest. God will, thereby, exalt thy name among all the kings. Potent is He over all things. Walk thou amongst men in the name of God, and by the power of His might, that thou mayest show forth His signs amidst the peoples of the earth....
      Regard ye the world as a man's body, which is afflicted with divers ailments, and the recovery of which dependeth upon the harmonizing of all of its component elements. Gather ye around that which We have prescribed unto you, and walk not in the ways of such as create dissension. Meditate on the world and the state of its people. He, for Whose sake the world was called into being, hath been imprisoned in the most desolate of cities (Akká), by reason of that which the hands of the wayward have wrought. From the horizon of His prison-city He summoneth mankind unto the Dayspring of God, the Exalted, the Great. Exultest thou over the treasures thou dost possess, knowing they shall perish? Rejoicest thou in that thou rulest a span of earth, when the whole world, in the estimation of the people of Baha, is worth as much as the black in the eye of a dead ant? Abandon it unto such as have set their affections upon it, and turn thou unto Him Who is the Desire of the world. Whither are gone the proud and their palaces? Gaze thou into their tombs, that thou mayest profit by this example, inasmuch as We made it a lesson unto every beholder. Were the breezes of Revelation to seize thee, thou wouldst flee the world, and turn unto the Kingdom, and wouldst expend all thou possessest, that thou mayest draw nigh unto this sublime Vision. '
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Napoleon III, Pages: 21-24.)




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is taken from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to the Czar of Russia. There are only a few changes in wording between the two passages.

      The first two changes are found in the same sentence. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh writes, "Beware that nothing deter thee from setting thy face towards thy Lord ..." However, this same sentence as found in His Tablet to the Czar reads: "Beware lest thy desire deter thee from turning towards the face of thy Lord ..."

      As you may notice, in one Bahá'u'lláh writes "Beware that nothing deter thee" and in the other " Beware lest thy desire deter thee". He is more specific in His Tablet to the Czar, warning the Czar of his desire, while in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He expands this warning to include not just desire but anything.

      The other change of wording in this sentence follows "deter thee from"; the change is from "turning towards the face of thy Lord" in His Tablet to the Czar to " from setting thy face towards thy Lord" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The next change in wording occurs when Bahá'u'lláh speaks of His imprisonment in the Siyyah-Chal. In His Tablet to the Czar, Bahá'u'lláh just calls it "the prison", while in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He is more specific as to which prison, saying "the prison of Tihran". I imagine the Czar would know to which prison Bahá'u'lláh referred as he would have been familiar with the episode Bahá'u'lláh was describing; the Shaykh, however, probably needed more of a description in order to know to which prison Bahá'u'lláh was referring.

      The remainder of these passages are word-for-word the same.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O Czar of Russia! Incline thine ear unto the voice of God, the King, the Holy, and turn thou unto Paradise, the Spot wherein abideth He Who, among the Concourse on high, beareth the most excellent titles, and Who, in the kingdom
of creation, is called by the name of God, the Effulgent, the All-Glorious. Beware that nothing deter thee from setting thy face towards thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Most Merciful. We, verily, have heard the thing for which thou didst supplicate thy Lord, whilst secretly communing with Him. Wherefore, the breeze of My loving-kindness wafted forth, and the sea of My mercy surged, and We answered thee in truth. Thy Lord, verily, is the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. Whilst I lay, chained and fettered, in the prison of Tihran, one of thy ministers extended Me his aid. Wherefore hath God ordained for thee a station which the knowledge of none can comprehend except His knowledge. Beware lest thou barter away this sublime station."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 96, p. 57.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
'O Czar of Russia! Incline thine ear unto the voice of God, the King, the Holy, and turn thou unto Paradise, the Spot wherein abideth He Who, among the Concourse on high, beareth the most excellent titles, and Who, in the kingdom of creation, is called by the name of God, the Effulgent, the All-Glorious. Beware lest thy desire deter thee from turning towards the face of thy Lord, the Compassionate, the Most Merciful. We, verily, have heard the thing for which thou didst supplicate thy Lord, whilst secretly communing with Him. Wherefore, the breeze of My loving-kindness wafted forth, and the sea of My mercy surged, and We answered thee in truth. Thy Lord, verily, is the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. Whilst I lay chained and fettered in the prison, one of thy ministers extended Me his aid. Wherefore hath God ordained for thee a station which the knowledge of none can comprehend except His knowledge. Beware lest thou barter away this sublime station... '
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Czar Alexander II, Page:27.)




      In this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, also quoted from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Czar Alexander II, there are again very few changes in wording. In fact, I could find only one. This change is a change in one of the
attributes of God mentioned by Bahá'u'lláh. It is a change from "the Exalted" in Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to the Czar to "the Mighty" in His Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      And further We have said: "He Who is the Father is come, and the Son (Jesus Christ), in the holy vale, crieth out: 'Here am I, here am I, O Lord, my God!', whilst Sinai circleth round the House, and the Burning Bush calleth aloud: 'The All-Bounteous is come mounted upon the clouds! Blessed is he that draweth nigh unto Him, and woe betide them that are far away.'
      "Arise thou amongst men in the name of this all-compelling Cause, and summon, then, the nations unto God, the Mighty, the Great. Be thou not of them who called upon God by one of His names, but who, when He Who is the Object of all names appeared, denied Him and turned aside from Him, and, in the end, pronounced sentence against Him with manifest injustice. Consider and call thou to mind the days whereon the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ) appeared, and Herod gave judgment against Him. God, however, aided Him with the hosts of the unseen, and protected Him with truth, and sent Him down unto another land, according to His promise. He, verily, ordaineth what He pleaseth. Thy Lord truly preserveth whom He willeth, be he in the midst of the seas or in the maw of the serpent, or beneath the sword of the oppressor."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 97-98, pp. 57-58.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      'He Who is the Father is come, and the Son (Jesus), in the holy vale, crieth out: 'Here am I, here am I, O Lord, My God!' whilst Sinai circleth round the House, and the Burning Bush calleth aloud: 'The All-Bounteous is come mounted upon the clouds! Blessed is he that draweth nigh unto Him, and woe betide them that are far away.'
      Arise thou amongst men in the name of this all-compelling Cause, and summon, then, the nations unto God, the Exalted, the Great. Be thou not of them who called upon God by one of His names, but who, when He Who is the Object of all names appeared, denied Him and turned aside from Him, and, in the end, pronounced sentence against Him with manifest injustice. Consider and call thou to mind the days whereon the Spirit of God (Jesus) appeared, and Herod gave judgment against Him. God, however, aided Him with the hosts of the unseen, and protected Him with truth, and sent Him down unto another land, according to His promise. He, verily, ordaineth what He pleaseth. Thy Lord truly preserveth whom He willeth, be he in the midst of the seas, or in the maw of the serpent, or beneath the sword of the oppressor.... '

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Czar Alexander II, Pages: 27-28)




      In this next passage, Bahá'u'lláh continues to quote from His Tablet to Czar Alexander II. There seem to be very few changes in wording between these two passages.

      The first change in wording I found was the omission of the phrase "in thy love for My name," which appears in His Tablet to Czar Alexander II in the phrase, "thou wouldst, in thy love for My name, and in thy longing for My
glorious and sublime Kingdom," but not in the corresponding phrase, "thou wouldst for longing after His glorious and sublime Kingdom," in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      Secondly, is the change from "in My path" in His Tablet to Czar Alexander II to " in the path of God" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. I don't know if this was His intention or not, but to me this emphasizes the Truth that Bahá'u'lláh's path is indeed God's path.

      I found no other changes in wording between these two passages.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
And further We have said: "Again I say: Hearken unto My voice that calleth from My prison, that it may acquaint thee with the things that have befallen My Beauty, at the hands of them that are the manifestations of My glory, and that thou mayest perceive how great hath been My patience, notwithstanding My might, and how immense My forbearance, notwithstanding My power. By My life! Couldst thou but know the things sent down by My Pen, and discover the treasures of My Cause, and the pearls of My mysteries which lie hid in the seas of My names and in the goblets of My words, thou wouldst for longing after His glorious and sublime Kingdom, lay down thy life in the path of God. Know thou that though My body be beneath the swords of My foes, and My limbs be beset with incalculable afflictions, yet My spirit is filled with a gladness with which all the joys of the earth can never compare."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par.99, pp. 58-59.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
'Again I say: Hearken unto My Voice that calleth from My prison that it may acquaint thee with the things that have befallen My Beauty, at the hands of them that are the manifestations of My glory, and that thou mayest perceive how great hath been My patience, notwithstanding My might, and how immense My forbearance, notwithstanding My power. By My Life! Couldst thou but know the things sent down by My Pen, and discover the treasures of My Cause, and the pearls of My mysteries which lie hid in the seas of My names and in the goblets of My words, thou wouldst, in thy love for My name, and in thy longing for My glorious and sublime Kingdom, lay down thy life in My path. Know thou that though My body be beneath the swords of My foes, and My limbs be beset with incalculable afflictions, yet My spirit is filled with a gladness with which all the joys of the earth can never compare. '
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Czar Alexander II, Pages 28-29.)




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf has only two small changes in wording from the same passage from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Queen Victoria of England.

      The first change is from "inhaled" in Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Queen Victoria to "hath inhaled" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The second and final change in wording is the omission of the word "whereupon" before the phrase "every single stone" from the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O Queen in London! Incline thine ear unto the voice of thy Lord, the Lord of all mankind, calling from the Divine Lote-Tree: Verily, no God is there but Me, the Almighty, the All-Wise! Cast away all that is on earth, and attire the head of thy kingdom with the crown of the remembrance of Thy Lord, the All-Glorious. He, in truth, hath come unto the world in His most great glory, and all that hath been mentioned in the Gospel hath been fulfilled. The land of Syria hath been honored by the footsteps of its Lord, the Lord of all men, and North and South are both inebriated with the wine of His presence. Blessed is the man that hath inhaled the fragrance of the Most Merciful, and turned unto the Dawning-Place of His beauty, in this resplendent Dawn. The Mosque of Aqsa vibrateth through the breezes of its Lord, the All-Glorious, whilst Batha (Mecca) trembleth at the voice of God, the Exalted, the Most High. Every single stone of them celebrateth the praise of the Lord, through this Great Name."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 101, pp. 59-60.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
O Queen in London! Incline thine ear unto the voice of thy Lord, the Lord of all mankind, calling from the Divine Lote-Tree: Verily, no God is there but Me, the Almighty, the All-Wise! Cast away all that is on earth, and attire the head of thy kingdom with the crown of the remembrance of thy Lord, the All-Glorious. He, in truth, hath come unto the world in His most great glory, and all that hath been mentioned in the Gospel hath been fulfilled. The land of Syria hath been honoured by the footsteps of its Lord, the Lord of all men, and North and South are both inebriated with the wine of His presence. Blessed is the man that inhaled the fragrance of the Most Merciful, and turned unto the Dawning-Place of His Beauty, in this resplendent Dawn. The Mosque of Aqsa vibrateth through the breezes of its Lord, the All-Glorious whilst Batha (Mecca) trembleth at the voice of God, the Exalted, the Most High. Whereupon every single stone of them celebrateth the praise of the Lord, through this Great Name.
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Queen Victoria, Page: 33)




      With this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh continues to quote from His Tablet to Queen Victoria. Again there are only a few changes in wording between these two passages. The first change between the two passages is the first sentence from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Queen Victoria, "Lay aside thy desire, and set then thine heart towards thy Lord, the Ancient of Days." Bahá'u'lláh omits this sentence from His quote in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, starting with the next sentence.

      The second change occurs after the phrase, " the doer of good". In the passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf He adds the phrase, "whether man or woman".

      The third and final change also involves an addition to what was originally revealed in His Tablet to Queen Victoria. In the section where Bahá'u'lláh praises her for entrusting the affairs of her kingdom into the hands of the representatives of the people. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf He adds the following passage:
"And if any one of them directeth himself towards the Assembly, let him turn his eyes unto the Supreme Horizon, and say: 'O my God! I ask Thee, by Thy most glorious Name, to aid me in that which will cause the affairs of Thy servants to prosper, and Thy cities to flourish. Thou, indeed, hast power over all things!'

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      And further We said: "We make mention of thee for the sake of God, and desire that thy name may be exalted through thy remembrance of God, the Creator of earth and of heaven. He, verily, is witness unto that which I say. We have been informed that thou hast forbidden the trading in slaves, both men and women. This, verily, is what God hath enjoined in this wondrous Revelation. God hath, truly, destined a reward for thee, because of this. He, verily, will pay the doer of good, whether man or woman, his due recompense, wert thou to follow what hath been sent unto thee by Him Who is the All-Knowing, the All-Informed. As to him who turneth aside, and swelleth with pride, after that the clear tokens have come unto him, from the Revealer of signs, his work shall God bring to naught. He, in truth, hath power over all things. Man's actions are acceptable after his having recognized (the Manifestation). He that turneth aside from the True One is indeed the most veiled amongst His creatures. Thus hath it been decreed by Him Who is the Almighty, the Most Powerful.
      "We have also heard that thou hast entrusted the reins of counsel into the hands of the representatives of the people. Thou, indeed, hast done well, for thereby the foundations of the edifice of thine affairs will be strengthened, and the hearts of all that are beneath thy shadow, whether high or low, will be tranquillized. It behooveth them, however, to be trustworthy among His servants, and to regard themselves as the representatives of all that dwell on earth. This is what counselleth them, in this Tablet, He Who is the Ruler, the All-Wise. And if any one of them directeth himself towards the Assembly, let him turn his eyes unto the Supreme Horizon, and say: 'O my God! I ask Thee, by Thy most glorious Name, to aid me in that which will cause the affairs of Thy servants to prosper, and Thy cities to flourish. Thou, indeed, hast power over all things!' Blessed is he that entereth the Assembly for the sake of God, and judgeth between men with pure justice. He, indeed, is of the blissful.

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 102-103, pp. 60-62.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      Lay aside thy desire, and set then thine heart towards thy Lord, the Ancient of Days. We make mention of thee for the sake of God, and desire that thy name may be exalted through thy remembrance of God, the Creator of earth and heaven. He, verily, is witness unto that which I say. We have been informed that thou hast forbidden the trading in slaves, both men and women. This, verily, is what God hath enjoined in this wondrous Revelation. God hath, truly, destined a reward for thee, because of this. He, verily, will pay the doer of good his due recompense, wert thou to follow what hath been sent unto thee by Him Who is the All-Knowing, the All-Informed. As to him who turneth aside, and swelleth with pride, after that the clear tokens have come unto him, from the Revealer of signs, his work shall God bring to naught. He, in truth, hath power over all things. Man's actions are acceptable after his having recognized (the Manifestation). He that turneth aside from the True One is indeed the most veiled amongst His creatures. Thus hath it been decreed by Him Who is the Almighty, the Most Powerful.
      We have also heard that thou hast entrusted the reins of counsel into the hands of the epresentatives of the people. Thou, indeed, hast done well, for thereby the foundations of the edifice of thine affairs will be strengthened, and the hearts of all that are beneath thy shadow, whether high or low, will be tranquillized. It behoveth them, however, to be trustworthy among His servants, and to regard themselves as the representatives of all that dwell on earth. This is what counselleth them, in this Tablet, He Who is the Ruler, the All-Wise... Blessed is he that entereth the assembly for the sake of God, and judgeth between men with pure justice. He, indeed, is of the blissful....

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Queen Victoria, Pages: 33-34)




      There is only one small change in wording between this next passage in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and Bahá'u'lláh's Source for this passage, His Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land.

      This change is located in the salutation Bahá'u'lláh uses. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf He says: "O ye members of Assemblies in that land and in other countries!"; whereas in His Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land, He states: "O ye the elected representatives of the people in every land!"

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "O ye members of Assemblies in that land and in other countries! Take ye counsel together, and let your concern be only for that which profiteth mankind, and bettereth the condition thereof, if ye be of them that scan heedfully. Regard the world as the human body which, though at its creation whole and perfect, hath been afflicted, through various causes, with grave disorders and maladies. Not for one day did it gain ease, nay, its sickness waxed more severe, as it fell under the treatment of ignorant physicians, who gave full rein to their personal desires, and have erred grievously. And if at one time, through the care of an able physician, a member of that body was healed, the rest remained afflicted as before. Thus informeth you the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. We behold it, in this day, at the mercy of rulers, so drunk with pride that they cannot discern clearly their own best advantage, much less recognize a Revelation so bewildering and challenging as this."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 104, p. 62.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      'O ye the elected representatives of the people in every land! Take ye counsel together, and let your concern be only for that which profiteth mankind, and bettereth the condition thereof, if ye be of them that scan heedfully. Regard the world as the human body which, though at its creation whole and perfect, hath been afflicted, through various causes, with grave disorders and maladies. Not for one day did it gain ease, nay its sickness waxed more severe, as it fell under the treatment of ignorant physicians, who gave full rein to their personal desires, and have erred grievously. And if, at one time, through the care of an able physician, a member of that body was healed, the rest remained afflicted as before. Thus informeth you the All-Knowing, the All-Wise.
      We behold it, in this day, at the mercy of rulers so drunk with pride that they cannot discern clearly their own best advantage, much less recognize a Revelation so bewildering and challenging as this.'

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land, Pages: 65-67.)




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is again taken from Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land. The changes in word are again few and small.
First: in the first line Bahá'u'lláh uses the word "God" in one and "the Lord" in the other. Since the two terms are so interchangeable anyway, this change is very minor.

      The second change is again a minor one. It is the change in the phrase "of the world" to "of all the world".

      Third: In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh inserts the exclamation "By my life!", which is not found in the Source passage.

      Fourth: In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh omits the word "verily", another minor change.

      The fifth and final change between these two passages, I believe, is again due to translation. Beginning with "Each time that Most Mighty Instrument hath come," there is no corresponding passage in the Source Tablet. Most likely, that portion of Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land has not yet been translated into English. This passage, therefore, is another one of those passages for which we have an English translation only because Bahá'u'lláh chose to include it in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, which was fully translated by the beloved Guardian, Shoghi Effendi.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
And further We have said: "That which God hath ordained as the sovereign remedy and mightiest instrument for the healing of the world is the union of all its peoples in one universal Cause, one common Faith. This can in no wise be achieved except through the power of a skilled, an all-powerful, and inspired Physician. By My life! This is the truth, and all else naught but error. Each time that Most Mighty Instrument hath come, and that Light shone forth from the Ancient Dayspring, He was withheld by ignorant physicians who, even as clouds, interposed themselves between Him and the world. It failed therefore, to recover, and its sickness hath persisted until this day. They indeed were powerless to protect it, or to effect a cure, whilst He Who hath been the Manifestation of Power amongst men was withheld from achieving His purpose, by reason of what the hands of the ignorant physicians have wrought.
      "Consider these days in which He Who is the Ancient Beauty hath come in the Most Great Name, that He may quicken the world and unite its peoples. They, however, rose up against Him with sharpened swords, and committed that which caused the Faithful Spirit to lament, until in the end they imprisoned Him in the most desolate of cities, and broke the grasp of the faithful upon the hem of His robe. Were anyone to tell them: 'The World Reformer is come,' they would answer and say: 'Indeed it is proven that He is a fomenter of discord!', and this notwithstanding that they have never associated with Him, and have perceived that He did not seek, for one moment, to protect Himself. At all times He was at the mercy of the wicked doers. At one time they cast Him into prison, at another they banished Him, and at yet another hurried Him from land to land. Thus have they pronounced judgment against Us, and God, truly, is aware of what I say."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 105-106, pp. 62-64.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"That which the Lord hath ordained as the sovereign remedy and mightiest instrument for the healing of all the world is the union of all its peoples in one universal Cause, one common Faith. This can in no wise be achieved except through the power of a skilled, an all-powerful and inspired Physician. This, verily, is the truth, and all else naught but error....
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to the Elected Representatives of the Peoples in Every Land, Pages: 67-68.)




      Bahá'u'lláh introduces this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf with these words: "These perspicuous verses have been sent down in one of the Tablets by the Abha Pen:" This clearly indicates that He is, once again, quoting Himself. I could not find this passage in any Tablet that has so far been translated into English other than this Tablet. Therefore, I do not have a Source quotation to present here.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "Hearken, O servant, unto the voice of this Wronged One, Who hath endured grievous vexations and trials in the path of God, the Lord of all Names, until such time as He was cast into prison, in the Land of (Tihrán). He summoned men unto the most sublime Paradise, and yet they seized Him and paraded Him through cities and countries. How many the nights during which slumber fled from the eyes of My loved ones, because of their love for Me; and how numerous the days whereon I had to face the assaults of the peoples against Me! At one time I found Myself on the heights of mountains; at another in the depths of the prison of (Tihrán), in chains and fetters. By the righteousness of God!
      I was at all times thankful unto Him, uttering His praise, engaged in remembering Him, directed towards Him, satisfied with His pleasure, and lowly and submissive before Him. So passed My days, until they ended in this Prison (Akká) which hath made the earth to tremble and the heavens to sigh. Happy that one who hath cast away his vain imaginings, when He Who was hid came with the standards of His signs. We, verily, have announced unto men this Most Great Revelation, and yet the people are in a state of strange stupor."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 128, pp. 78-79.]




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is quoted from the Lawh-i-Burhán (the Tablet of the Proof). This Tablet was directed in part to the Shaykh's father, surnamed "the Wolf" by Bahá'u'lláh. Again there are only a few minor changes in wording between these two passages.

      The first change in wording is how Bahá'u'lláh addresses the Wolf. At one time, Bahá'u'lláh iaddresses him in the Lawh-i-Burhán "O Baqir!", while in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf He addresses him as follows: "O thou who art
reputed for thy learning!"

      Second is the substitution of the phrase "Every man of discernment" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf for "Every man of learning" in the Lawh-i-Burhán.

      The third change is a very simple one: the use of the word "truly" in one and of "verily" in the other.

      Fourth: In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh omitted the following which was located in the midst of the passage quoted from the Lawh-i-Burhán: "When thou didst pen thy judgement, thou wast accused by thy very pen. Unto this doth bear witness the Pen of God, the Most High, in His inaccessible station."

      The fifth change is the omission of the address,"O foolish one!" which is included in the Lawh-i-Burhán, but not in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The sixth and final change is again a minor one, one of verb usage: In one Bahá'u'lláh writes "foundered"; in the other He says "has foundered".

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "He is the Almighty, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise! The winds of hatred have encompassed the Ark of Batha (Mecca), by reason of that which the hands of the oppressors have wrought. O thou who art reputed for thy learning! Thou hast pronounced sentence against them for whom the books of the world have wept, and in whose favor the scriptures of all religions have testified. Thou, who art gone far astray, art indeed wrapt in a thick veil. By God Himself! Thou hast pronounced judgment against them through whom the horizon of faith hath been illumined. Unto this bear witness They Who are the Dawning-Places of Revelation and the Manifestations of the Cause of thy Lord, the Most Merciful, Who have sacrificed Their souls and all that They possessed in His straight Path. The Faith of God hath cried everywhere, by reason of thy tyranny, and yet thou disportest thyself and art of them that exult. There is no hatred in Mine heart for thee nor for anyone. Every man of discernment beholdeth thee, and such as are like thee, engulfed in evident folly. Hadst thou realized that which thou hast done, thou wouldst have cast thyself into the fire, or abandoned thine home and fled unto the mountains, or wouldst have groaned until thou hadst returned unto the place destined for thee by Him Who is the Lord of strength and of might. O thou who art even as nothing! Rend thou asunder the veils of idle fancies and vain imaginings, that thou mayest behold the Daystar of knowledge shining from this resplendent Horizon. Thou hast torn in pieces a remnant of the Prophet Himself, and imagined that thou hadst helped the Faith of God. Thus hath thy soul prompted thee, and thou art truly one of the heedless. Thine act hath consumed the hearts of the Concourse on high, and those of such as have circled round the Cause of God, the Lord of the worlds. The soul of the Chaste One (Fatimih) melted, by reason of thy cruelty, and the inmates of Paradise wept sore in that blessed Spot.
      "Judge thou fairly, I adjure thee by God. What proof did the Jewish doctors adduce wherewith to condemn Him Who was the Spirit of God (Jesus Christ), when He came unto them with truth? What could have been the evidence produced by the Pharisees and the idolatrous priests to justify their denial of Muhammad, the Apostle of God when He came unto them with a Book that judged between truth and falsehood with a justice which turned into light the darkness of the earth, and enraptured the hearts of such as had known Him? Indeed thou hast produced, in this day, the same proofs which the foolish divines advanced in that age. Unto this testifieth He Who is the King of the realm of grace in this great Prison. Thou hast, truly, walked in their ways, nay, hast surpassed them in their cruelty, and hast deemed thyself to be helping the Faith and defending the Law of God, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. By Him Who is the Truth! Thine iniquity hath made Gabriel to groan, and hath drawn tears from the Law of God, through which the breezes of justice have been wafted over all who are in heaven and on earth. Hast thou fondly imagined that the judgment thou didst pronounce hath profited thee? Nay, by Him Who is the King of all Names! Unto thy loss testifieth He with Whom is the knowledge of all things as recorded in the preserved Tablet.
      "O thou who hast gone astray! Thou hast neither seen Me, nor associated with Me, nor been My companion for the fraction of a moment. How is it, then, that thou hast bidden men to curse Me? Didst thou, in this, follow the promptings of thine own desires, or didst thou obey thy Lord? Produce thou a sign, if thou art one of the truthful. We testify that thou hast cast behind thy back the Law of God, and laid hold on the dictates of thy passions. Nothing, in truth, escapeth His knowledge; He, verily, is the Incomparable, the All-Informed. O heedless one! Hearken unto that which the Merciful hath revealed in the Qur'an: 'Say not to every one who meeteth you with a greeting, "Thou art not a believer."' Thus hath He decreed in Whose grasp are the kingdoms of Revelation and of creation, if thou be of them that hearken. Thou hast set aside the commandment of God, and clung unto the promptings of thine own desire. Woe, then, unto thee, O careless one that doubtest! If thou deniest Me, by what proof canst thou vindicate the truth of that which thou dost possess? Produce it, then, O thou who hast joined partners with God, and turned aside from His sovereignty that hath encompassed the worlds!
      "Know thou that he is truly learned who hath acknowledged My Revelation, and drunk from the Ocean of My knowledge, and soared in the atmosphere of My love, and cast away all else besides Me, and taken firm hold on that which hath been sent down from the Kingdom of My wondrous utterance. He, verily, is even as an eye unto mankind, and as the spirit of life unto the body of all creation. Glorified be the All-Merciful Who hath enlightened him, and caused him to arise and serve His great and mighty Cause. Verily, such a man is blessed by the Concourse on high, and by them who dwell within the Tabernacle of Grandeur, who have quaffed My sealed Wine in My Name, the Omnipotent, the All-Powerful. If thou be of them that occupy such a sublime station, produce then a sign from God, the Creator of the heavens. And shouldst thou recognize thy powerlessness, do thou rein in thy passions, and return unto thy Lord, that perchance He may forgive thee thy sins which have caused the leaves of the Divine Lote-Tree to be burnt up, and the Rock to cry out, and the eyes of men of understanding to weep. Because of thee the Veil of Divinity was rent asunder, and the Ark has foundered, and the She-Camel was hamstrung, and the Spirit (Jesus) groaned in His sublime retreat. Disputest thou with Him Who hath come unto thee with the testimonies of God and His signs which thou possessest and which are in the possession of them that dwell on earth? Open thine eyes that thou mayest behold this Wronged One shining forth above the horizon of the will of God, the Sovereign, the Truth, the Resplendent. Unstop, then, the ear of thine heart that thou mayest hearken unto the speech of the Divine Lote-Tree that hath been raised up in truth by God, the Almighty, the Beneficent. Verily, this Tree, notwithstanding the things that befell it by reason of thy cruelty and of the transgressions of such as are like thee, calleth aloud and summoneth all men unto the Sadratu'l-Muntaha and the Supreme Horizon. Blessed is the soul that hath gazed on the Most Mighty Sign, and the ear that hath heard His most sweet Voice, and woe to whosoever hath turned aside and done wickedly.
      "O thou who hast turned away from God! Wert thou to look with the eye of fairness upon the Divine Lote-Tree, thou wouldst perceive the marks of thy sword on its boughs, and its branches, and its leaves, notwithstanding that God created thee for the purpose of recognizing and of serving it. Reflect, that haply thou mayest recognize thine iniquity and be numbered with such as have repented. Thinkest thou that We fear thy cruelty? Know thou and be well assured that from the first day whereon the voice of the Most Sublime Pen was raised betwixt earth and heaven We offered up Our souls, and Our bodies, and Our sons, and Our possessions in the path of God, the Exalted, the Great, and We glory therein amongst all created things and the Concourse on high. Unto this testify the things which have befallen Us in this straight Path. By God! Our hearts were consumed, and Our bodies were crucified, and Our blood was spilt, while Our eyes were fixed on the horizon of the loving-kindness of their Lord, the Witness, the All-Seeing. The more grievous their woes, the greater waxed the love of the people of Baha. Unto their sincerity hath borne witness what the All-Merciful hath sent down in the Qur'an. He saith: 'Wish ye, then, for death, if ye are sincere.' Who is to be preferred, he that hath sheltered himself behind curtains, or he that hath offered himself in the path of God? Judge thou fairly, and be not of them that rove distraught in the wilderness of falsehood. So carried away have they been by the living waters of the love of the Most Merciful, that neither the arms of the world nor the swords of the nations have deterred them from setting their faces towards the ocean of the bounty of their Lord, the Giver, the Generous.
      "By God! Troubles have failed to unnerve Me, and the repudiation of the divines hath been powerless to weaken Me. I have spoken, and still speak forth before the face of men: 'The door of grace hath been unlocked and He Who is the Dayspring of Justice is come with perspicuous signs and evident testimonies, from God, the Lord of strength and of might!' Present thyself before Me that thou mayest hear the mysteries which were heard by the Son of Imran (Moses) upon the Sinai of Wisdom. Thus commandeth thee He Who is the Dawning-Place of the Revelation of thy Lord, the God of Mercy, from His great Prison."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 131-136, pp. 79-86.]

Passage from Earlier Source:

     
"He is the Almighty, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise! The winds of hatred have encompassed the Ark of Batha, by reason of that which the hands of the oppressors have wrought. O Baqir! Thou hast pronounced sentence against them for whom the books of the world have wept, and in whose favour the scriptures of all religions have testified. Thou, who art gone far astray, art indeed wrapt in a thick veil. By God Himself! Thou hast pronounced judgement against them through whom the horizon of faith hath been illumined. Unto this bear witness They Who are the Dawning-Places of Revelation and the Manifestations of the Cause of thy Lord, the Most Merciful, Who have sacrificed Their souls and all that They possessed in His straight Path. The Faith of God hath cried everywhere, by reason of thy tyranny, and yet thou disportest thyself and art of them that exult. There is no hatred in Mine heart for thee nor for anyone. Every man of learning beholdeth thee, and such as are like thee, engulfed in evident folly. Hadst thou realized that which thou hast done, thou wouldst have cast thyself into the fire, or abandoned thine home and fled into the mountains, or wouldst have groaned until thou hadst returned unto the place destined for thee by Him Who is the Lord of strength and of might. O thou who art even as nothing! Rend thou asunder the veils of idle fancies and vain imaginings, that thou mayest behold the Day-Star of knowledge shining from this resplendent Horizon. Thou hast torn in pieces a remnant of the Prophet Himself, and imagined that thou hadst helped the Faith of God. Thus hath thy soul prompted thee, and thou art truly one of the heedless. Thine act hath consumed the hearts of the Concourse on high, and those of such as have circled round the Cause of God, the Lord of the worlds. The soul of the Chaste One melted, by reason of thy cruelty, and the inmates of Paradise wept sore in that blessed Spot.
      Judge thou fairly, I adjure thee by God. What proof did the Jewish doctors adduce wherewith to condemn Him Who was the Spirit of God,when He came unto them with truth? What could have been the evidence produced by the Pharisees and the idolatrous priests to justify their denial of Muhammad, the Apostle of God when He came unto them with a Book that judged between truth and falsehood with a justice which turned into light the darkness of the earth, and enraptured the hearts of such as had known Him? Indeed thou hast produced, in this day, the same proofs which the foolish divines advanced in that age. Unto this testifieth He Who is the King of the realm of grace in this great Prison.
      Thou hast, truly, walked in their ways, nay, hast surpassed them in their cruelty, and hast deemed thyself to be helping the Faith and defending the Law of God, the All-Knowing, the All-Wise. By Him Who is the Truth! Thine iniquity hath made Gabriel to groan, and hath drawn tears from the Law of God, through which the breezes of justice have been wafted over all who are in heaven and on earth. Hast thou fondly imagined that the judgement thou didst pronounce hath profited thee? Nay, by Him Who is the King of all Names! Unto thy loss testifieth He with Whom is the knowledge of all things as recorded in the preserved Tablet. When thou didst pen thy judgement, thou wast accused by thy very pen. Unto this doth bear witness the Pen of God, the Most High, in His inaccessible station.
      O thou who hast gone astray! Thou hast neither seen Me, nor associated with Me, nor been My companion for the fraction of a moment. How is it, then, that thou hast bidden men to curse Me? Didst thou, in this, follow the promptings of thine own desires, or didst thou obey thy Lord? Produce thou a sign, if thou art one of the truthful. We testify that thou hast cast behind thy back the Law of God, and laid hold on the dictates of thy passions. Nothing, in truth, escapeth His knowledge; He, verily, is the Incomparable, the All-Informed. O heedless one! Hearken unto that which the Merciful hath revealed in the Qur'an: 'Say not to every one who meeteth you with a greeting, "Thou art not a believer."' Thus hath He decreed in Whose grasp are the kingdoms of Revelation and of creation, if thou be of them that hearken. Thou hast set aside the commandment of God, and clung unto the promptings of thine own desire. Woe, then, unto thee, O careless one that doubtest! If thou deniest Me, by what proof canst thou vindicate the truth of that which thou dost possess? Produce it, then, O thou who hast joined partners with God, and turned aside from His sovereignty that hath encompassed the worlds
      O foolish one! Know thou that he is truly learned who hath acknowledged My Revelation, and drunk from the Ocean of My knowledge, and soared in the atmosphere of My love, and cast away all else besides Me, and taken firm hold on that which hath been sent down from the Kingdom of My wondrous utterance. He, verily, is even as an eye unto mankind, and as the spirit of life unto the body of all creation. Glorified be the All-Merciful Who hath enlightened him, and caused him to arise and serve His great and mighty Cause. Verily, such a man is blessed by the Concourse on high, and by them who dwell within the Tabernacle of Grandeur, who have quaffed My sealed Wine in My Name, the Omnipotent, the All-Powerful. O Baqir! If thou be of them that occupy such a sublime station, produce then a sign from God, the Creator of the heavens. And shouldst thou recognize thy powerlessness, do thou rein in thy passions, and return unto thy Lord, that perchance He may forgive thee thy sins which have caused the leaves of the Divine Lote-Tree to be burnt up, and the Rock to cry out, and the eyes of men of understanding to weep. Because of thee the Veil of Divinity was rent asunder, and the Ark foundered, and the She-Camel was hamstrung, and the Spirit groaned in His sublime retreat. Disputest thouwith Him Who hath come unto thee with the testimonies of God and His signs which thou possessest and which are in the possession of them that dwell on earth? Open thine eyes that thou mayest behold this Wronged One shining forth above the horizon of the will of God, the Sovereign, the Truth, the Resplendent. Unstop, then, the ear of thine heart that thou mayest hearken unto the speech of the Divine Lote-Tree that hath been raised up in truth by God, the Almighty, the Beneficent. Verily, this Tree, notwithstanding the things that befell it by reason of thy cruelty and of the transgressions of such as are like thee, calleth aloud and summoneth all men unto the Sadratu'l-Muntaha and the Supreme Horizon. Blessed is the soul that hath gazed on the Most Mighty Sign, and the ear that hath heard His most sweet Voice, and woe to whosoever hath turned aside and done wickedly.
      O thou who hast turned away from God! Wert thou to look with the eye of fairness upon the Divine Lote-Tree, thou wouldst perceive the marks of thy sword on its boughs, and its branches, and its leaves, notwithstanding that God created thee for the purpose of recognizing and of serving it. Reflect, that haply thou mayest recognize thine iniquity and be numbered with such as have repented. Thinkest thou that We fear thy cruelty? Know thou and be well assured that from the first day whereon the voice of the Most Sublime Pen was raised betwixt earth and heaven We offered up Our souls, and Our bodies, and Our sons, and Our possessions in the path of God, the Exalted, the Great, and We glory therein amongst all created things and the Concourse on high. Unto this testify the things which have befallen Us in this straight Path. By God! Our hearts were consumed, and Our bodies were crucified, and Our blood was spilt, while Our eyes were fixed on the horizon of the loving-kindness of their Lord, the Witness, the All-Seeing. The more grievous their woes, the greater waxed the love of the people of Baha. Unto their sincerity hath borne witness what the All-Merciful hath sent down in the Qur'an. He saith: 'Wish ye, then, for death, if ye are sincere.' Who is to be preferred, he that hath sheltered himself behind curtains, or he that hath offered himself in the path of God? Judge thou fairly, and be not of them that rove distraught in the wilderness of falsehood. So carried away have they been by the living waters of the love of the Most Merciful, that neither the arms of the world nor the swords of the nations have deterred them from setting their faces towards the ocean of the bounty of their Lord, the Giver, the Generous.
      By God! Troubles have failed to unnerve Me, and the repudiation of the divines hath been powerless to weaken Me. I have spoken, and still speak forth before the face of men: 'The door of grace hath been unlocked and He Who is the Dayspring of Justice is come with perspicuous signs and evident testimonies, from God, the Lord of strength and of might!' Present thyself before Me that thou mayest hear the mysteries which were heard by the Son of Imran(1) upon the Sinai of Wisdom. Thus commandeth thee He Who is the Dawning-Place of the Revelation of thy Lord, the God of Mercy, from His great Prison."

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Lawh-i-Burhán, Pages: 205-210.)




      In this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, I could find only one change from the Source Tablet. Bahá'u'lláh adds the following at the end of the quote in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf: "We pray God to protect thee from the heat of jealousy and the cold of hatred. He verily is nigh, ready to answer."

      Though Epistle to the Son of the Wolf was one of the two Sources listed for the passage in Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh which I am using as the Source for this quote, I believe that, had that been the actual Source for the passage in Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, then this last section would also have been included. Therefore, I listed the other Source mentioned for this section from Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh.

     
Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Be generous in prosperity, and thankful in adversity. Be worthy of the trust of thy neighbor, and look upon him with a bright and friendly face. Be a treasure to the poor, an admonisher to the rich, an answerer to the cry of the needy, a preserver of the sanctity of thy pledge. Be fair in thy judgment, and guarded in thy speech. Be unjust to no man, and show all meekness to all men. Be as a lamp unto them that walk in darkness, a joy to the sorrowful, a sea for the thirsty, a haven for the distressed, an upholder and defender of the victim of oppression. Let integrity and uprightness distinguish all thine acts. Be a home for the stranger, a balm to the suffering, a tower of strength for the fugitive. Be eyes to the blind, and a guiding light unto the feet of the erring. Be an ornament to the countenance of truth, a crown to the brow of fidelity, a pillar of the temple of righteousness, a breath of life to the body of mankind, an ensign of the hosts of justice, a luminary above the horizon of virtue, a dew to the soil of the human heart, an ark on the ocean of knowledge, a sun in the heaven of bounty, a gem on the diadem of wisdom, a shining light in the firmament of thy generation, a fruit upon the tree of humility. We pray God to protect thee from the heat of jealousy and the cold of hatred. He verily is nigh, ready to answer."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 148, pp. 93-94.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Be generous in prosperity, and thankful in adversity. Be worthy of the trust of thy neighbor, and look upon him with a bright and friendly face. Be a treasure to the poor, an admonisher to the rich, an answerer of the cry of the needy, a preserver of the sanctity of thy pledge. Be fair in thy judgment, and guarded in thy speech. Be unjust to no man, and show all meekness to all men. Be as a lamp unto them that walk in darkness, a joy to the sorrowful, a sea for the thirsty, a haven for the distressed, an upholder and defender of the victim of oppression. Let integrity and uprightness distinguish all thine acts. Be a home for the stranger, a balm to the suffering, a tower of strength for the fugitive. Be eyes to the blind, and a guiding light unto the feet of the erring. Be an ornament to the countenance of truth, a crown to the brow of fidelity, a pillar of the temple of righteousness, a breath of life to the body of mankind, an ensign of the hosts of justice, a luminary above the horizon of virtue, a dew to the soil of the human heart, an ark on the ocean of knowledge, a sun in the heaven of bounty, a gem on the diadem of wisdom, a shining light in the firmament of thy generation, a fruit upon the tree of humility."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, Sect. CXXX, cited in letter to 'Andalib in AQA, 2, 17-18,.]




      On pages 96-97 (par. 157) of Epistle to the Son of the Wolf , Bahá'u'lláh precedes this next passage with the following: 'At this moment a Voice was raised from the right-hand of the Luminous Spot: "God! There is none other God but Him, the Ordainer, the All-Wise! Recite Thou unto the Shaykh the remaining passages of the Lawh-i-Burhán (Tablet of the Proof) that they may draw him unto the horizon of the Revelation of his Lord, the God of Mercy, that haply he may arise to aid My Cause with perspicuous signs and exalted testimonies, and may speak forth amongst men that which the Tongue of Testimony hath spoken: 'The Kingdom is God's, the Lord of the worlds!'"' There are several changes between the two passages.

      The first and one of the biggest changes between these two passages is that, in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf , Bahá'u'lláh omits the following paragraph which, in the Lawh-i-Burhán, occurs between the two passages which Bahá'u'lláh has quoted from that Tablet: "Hath leadership made thee proud? Peruse thou what God hath revealed to the Sovereign ruler, the Sultan of Turkey, who hath incarcerated Me in this fortified stronghold, so that thou mayest be informed of the condition of this Wronged One, as decreed by God, the One, the Single, the All-Informed. Art thou happy to see the abject and worthless as thy followers? They support thee as did a people before them, they that followed Annas, who, without clear proof and testimony, pronounced judgement against the Spirit."

      The second and third changes are again ones of form of address. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf , Bahá'u'lláh writes:, "O concourse of the kindreds of the earth!", while in the Lawh-i-Burhán He writes, "O concourse of divines!" Then, later in that same paragraph, the addresses are " O people" and "O concourse of divines," respectively.

      The fourth change is the biggest change between these two passages. Again the change is one in which Bahá'u'lláh omits 3 paragraphs in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf which are found in the Lawh-i-Burhán. These paragraphs begin with "O Baqir! Read and call thou to mind that which was said of old by a believer of thy stock:".

      The fifth change is again a minor one, which could be one of translation: "anyone" in the Lawh-i-Burhán becomes "any one" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The sixth change is again one of form of address: "O Baqir!" in the Lawh-i-Burhán becomes "O heedless one!" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The seventh change is once again the omission of a paragraph from the passage in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. This is the paragraph, which begins: "Consider the Sultan of Turkey!"

      The eighth change is the omission of the phrase "Leave Thou the mention of the Wolf" from the passage in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The ninth change is a change of verb usage from "which no sooner were sent down" in the Lawh-i-Burhán to "which had no sooner been sent down from the heaven of His Cause" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The tenth change is the addition of the phrase "O foolish one!" in the passage quoted in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

      The eleventh change is again one mostly of verb usage. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh writes, "Thou hast slain" and in the Lawh-i-Burhán, He writes that they "have been slain". Besides verb usage, in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh seems to be more specific in regard to whom He is accusing.

      The twelfth and last change is again a minor one. It is the use of the word "erelong" in one and the separation of that word into two words "ere long" in the other.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "Peruse thou the Kitab-i-Iqan (Book of Certitude) and that which the All-Merciful hath sent down unto the King of Paris (Napoleon III) and to such as are like him, that thou mayest be made aware of the things that have happened in the past, and be persuaded that We have not sought to spread disorder in the land after it had been well-ordered. We exhort, wholly for the sake of God, His servants. Let him who wisheth turn unto Him, and him who wisheth turn aside. Our Lord, the Merciful, is verily the All-Sufficing, the All-Praised. O concourse of the kindreds of the earth! This is the day whereon nothing amongst all things, nor any name amongst all names, can profit you save through this Name which God hath made the Manifestation of His Cause and the Dayspring of His Most Excellent Titles unto all who are in the kingdom of creation. Blessed is that man that hath recognized the fragrance of the All-Merciful and been numbered with the steadfast. Your sciences shall not profit you in this day, nor your arts, nor your treasures, nor your glory. Cast them all behind your backs, and set your faces towards the Most Sublime Word through which the Scriptures and the Books and this lucid Tablet have been distinctly set forth. Cast away, O people, the things ye have composed with the pen of your idle fancies and vain imaginings. By God! The Daystar of Knowledge hath shone forth above the horizon of certitude.
      "O thou who art gone astray! If thou hast any doubt concerning Our conduct, know thou that We bear witness unto that whereunto God hath Himself borne witness ere the creation of the heavens and of the earth, that there is none other God but Him, the Almighty, the All-Bounteous. We testify that He is One in His Essence, One in His Attributes. He hath none to equal Him in the whole universe, nor any partner in all creation. He hath sent forth His Messengers, and sent down His Books, that they may announce unto His creatures the Straight Path.
      "Hath the Shah been informed, and chosen to close his eyes to thine acts? Or hath he been seized with fear at the howling of a pack of wolves who have cast the path of God behind their backs and followed in thy way without any clear proof or Book? We have heard that the provinces of Persia have been adorned with the adornment of justice. When We observed closely, however, We found them to be the dawning-places of tyranny and the daysprings of injustice. We behold justice in the clutches of tyranny. We beseech God to set it free through the power of His might and His sovereignty. He, verily, overshadoweth all that is in the heavens and on earth. To none is given the right to protest against any one concerning that which hath befallen the Cause of God. It behooveth whosoever hath set his face towards the Most Sublime Horizon to cleave tenaciously unto the cord of patience, and to put his reliance in God, the Help in Peril, the Unconstrained. O ye loved ones of God! Drink your fill from the wellspring of wisdom, and soar ye in the atmosphere of wisdom, and speak forth with wisdom and eloquence. Thus biddeth you your Lord, the Almighty, the All-Knowing.
      "O heedless one! Rely not on thy glory, and thy power. Thou art even as the last trace of sunlight upon the mountain-top. Soon will it fade away as decreed by God, the All-Possessing, the Most High. Thy glory and the glory of such as are like thee have been taken away, and this verily is what hath been ordained by the One with Whom is the Mother Tablet. Where is he to be found who contended with God, and whither is gone he that gainsaid His signs, and turned aside from His sovereignty? Where are they who have slain His chosen ones and spilt the blood of His holy ones? Reflect, that haply thou mayest perceive the breaths of thine acts, O foolish doubter! Because of you the Apostle (Muhammad) lamented, and the Chaste One (Fatimih) cried out, and the countries were laid waste, and darkness fell upon all regions. O concourse of divines! Because of you the people were abased, and the banner of Islam was hauled down, and its mighty throne subverted. Every time a man of discernment hath sought to hold fast unto that which would exalt Islam, ye raised a clamor, and thereby was he deterred from achieving his purpose, while the land remained fallen in clear ruin.
      "O My Supreme Pen! Call Thou to remembrance the She-Serpent (Imam-Jum'ih of Isfahan) whose cruelty hath caused all created things to groan, and the limbs of the holy ones to quake. Thus biddeth Thee the Lord of all names, in this glorious station. The Chaste One (Fatimih) hath cried out by reason of thine iniquity, and yet thou dost imagine thyself to be of the family of the Apostle of God! Thus hath thy soul prompted thee, O thou who hast withdrawn thyself from God, the Lord of all that hath been and shall be. Judge thou equitably, O She-Serpent! For what crime didst thou sting the children of the Apostle of God (King of Martyrs and Beloved of Martyrs), and pillage their possessions? Hast thou denied Him Who created thee by His command 'be, and it was'? Thou hast dealt with the children of the Apostle of God as neither Ad hath dealt with Hud, nor Thamud with Salih, nor the Jews with the Spirit of God (Jesus), the Lord of all being. Gainsayest thou the signs of thy Lord which had no sooner been sent down from the heaven of His Cause than all the books of the world bowed down before them? Meditate, that thou mayest be made aware of thine act, O heedless outcast! Erelong will the breaths of chastisement seize thee, as they seized others before thee. Wait, O thou who hast joined partners with God, the Lord of the visible and the invisible. This is the day which God hath announced through the tongue of His Apostle. Reflect, that thou mayest apprehend what the All-Merciful hath sent down in the Qur'an and in this inscribed Tablet. This is the day whereon He Who is the Dayspring of Revelation hath come with clear tokens which none can number. This is the day whereon every man endued with perception hath discovered the fragrance of the breeze of the All-Merciful in the world of creation, and every man of insight hath hastened unto the living waters of the mercy of his Lord, the King of Kings. O heedless one! The tale of the Sacrifice (Ishmael) hath been retold, and he who was to be offered up hath directed his steps towards the place of sacrifice, and returned not, by reason of that which thy hand hath wrought, O perverse hater! Didst thou imagine that martyrdom could abase this Cause? Nay, by Him Whom God hath made to be the Repository of His Revelation, if thou be of them that comprehend. Woe betide thee, O thou who hast joined partners with God, and woe betide them that have taken thee as their leader, without a clear token or a perspicuous Book. How numerous the oppressors before thee who have arisen to quench the light of God, and how many the impious who murdered and pillaged until the hearts and souls of men groaned by reason of their cruelty! The sun of justice hath been obscured, inasmuch as the embodiment of tyranny hath been stablished upon the throne of hatred, and yet the people understand not. O foolish one! Thou hast slain the children of the Apostle and pillaged their possessions. Say: Was it, in thine estimation, their possessions or themselves that denied God? Judge fairly, O ignorant one that hath been shut out as by a veil from God. Thou hast clung to tyranny, and cast away justice; whereupon all created things have lamented, and still thou art among the wayward. Thou hast put to death the aged, and plundered the young. Thinkest thou that thou wilt consume that which thine iniquity hath amassed? Nay, by Myself! Thus informeth thee He Who is cognizant of all. By God! The things thou possessest shall profit thee not, nor what thou hast laid up through thy cruelty. Unto this beareth witness thy Lord, the All-Knowing. Thou hast arisen to put out the light of this Cause; erelong will thine own fire be quenched, at His behest. He, verily, is the Lord of strength and of might. The changes and chances of the world, and the powers of the nations, cannot frustrate Him. He doeth what He pleaseth, and ordaineth what He willeth through the power of His sovereignty. Consider the she-camel. Though but a beast, yet hath the All-Merciful exalted her to so high a station that the tongues of the earth made mention of her and celebrated her praise. He, verily, overshadoweth all that is in the heavens and on earth. No God is there but Him, the Almighty, the Great. Thus have We adorned the heaven of Our Tablet with the suns of Our words. Blessed the man that hath attained thereunto, and been illumined with their light, and woe betide such as have turned aside, and denied Him, and strayed far from Him. Praised be God, the Lord of the worlds!"

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 154-158, pp. 97-103.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Hath leadership made thee proud? Peruse thou what God hath revealed to the Sovereign ruler, the Sultan of Turkey, who hath incarcerated Me in this fortified stronghold, so that thou mayest be informed of the condition of this Wronged One, as decreed by God, the One, the Single, the All-Informed. Art thou happy to see the abject and worthless as thy followers? They support thee as did a people before them, they that followed Annas, who, without clear proof and testimony, pronounced judgement against the Spirit.
      "Peruse thou the Kitab-i-Iqan and that which the All-Merciful hath sent down unto the King of Paris and to such as are like him, that thou mayest be made aware of the things that have happened in the past, and be persuaded that We have not sought to spread disorder in the land after it had been well-ordered. We exhort, wholly for the sake of God, His servants. Let him who wisheth turn unto Him, and him who wisheth turn aside. Our Lord, the Merciful, is verily the All-Sufficing, the All-Praised. O concourse of divines! This is the day whereon nothing amongst all things, nor any name amongst all names, can profit you save through this Name which God hath made the Manifestation of His Cause and the Dayspring of His Most Excellent Titles unto all who are in the kingdom of creation. Blessed is that man that hath recognized the fragrance of the All-Merciful and been numbered with the steadfast. Your sciences shall not profit you in this day, nor your arts, nor your treasures, nor your glory. Cast them all behind your backs, and set your faces towards the Most Sublime Word through which the Scriptures and the Books and this lucid Tablet have been distinctly set forth. Cast away, O concourse of divines, the things ye have composed with the pens of your idle fancies and vain imaginings. By God! The Day-Star of Knowledge hath shone forth above the horizon of certitude.
      "O Baqir! Read and call thou to mind that which was said of old by a believer of thy stock: 'Will ye slay a man because he saith my Lord is God, when He hath already come to you with signs from your Lord? If he be a liar, on him will be his lie, but if he be a man of truth, part of what he threateneth will fall upon you. In truth God guideth not him who is a transgressor, a liar.'
      "O thou who art gone astray! If thou hast any doubt concerning Our conduct, know thou that We bear witness unto that whereunto God hath Himself borne witness ere the creation of the heavens and of the earth, that there is none other God but Him, the Almighty, the All-Bounteous. We testify that He is One in His Essence, One in His attributes. He hath none to equal Him in the whole universe, nor any partner in all creation. He hath sent forth His Messengers, and sent down His Books, that they may announce unto His creatures the Straight Path.
      "Hath the Shah been informed, and chosen to close his eyes to thine acts? Or hath he been seized with fear at the howling of a pack of wolves who have cast the Path of God behind their backs and followed in thy way without any clear proof or Book? We have heard that the provinces of Persia have been adorned with the adornment of justice. When We observed closely, however, We found them to be the dawning-places of tyranny and the daysprings of injustice. We behold justice in the clutches of tyranny. We beseech God to set it free through the power of His might and His sovereignty. He, verily, overshadoweth all that is in the heavens and on earth. To none is given the right to protest against anyone concerning that which hath befallen the Cause of God. It behoveth whosoever hath set his face towards the Most Sublime Horizon to cleave tenaciously unto the cord of patience, and to put his reliance in God, the Help in Peril, the Unconstrained. O ye loved ones of God! Drink your fill from the well-spring of wisdom, and walk ye in the garden of wisdom, and soar ye in the atmosphere of wisdom, and speak forth with wisdom and eloquence. Thus biddeth you your Lord, the Almighty, the All-Knowing.
      "O Baqir! Rely not on thy glory, and thy power. Thou art even as the last trace of sunlight upon the mountain-top. Soon will it fade away, as decreed by God, the All-Possessing, the Most High. Thy glory and the glory of such as are like thee have been taken away, and this verily is what hath been ordained by the One with Whom is the Mother Tablet. Where is he to be found who contended with God, and whither is gone he that gainsaid His signs, and turned aside from His sovereignty? Where are they who have slain His chosen ones and spilt the blood of His holy ones? Reflect, that haply thou mayest perceive the breaths of thine acts, O foolish doubter! Because of you the Apostle lamented, and the Chaste One cried out, and the countries were laid waste, and darkness fell upon all regions. O concourse of divines! Because of you the people were abased, and the banner of Islam was hauled down, and its mighty throne subverted. Every time a man of discernment hath sought to hold fast unto that which would exalt Islam, ye raised a clamour, and thereby was he deterred from achieving his purpose, while the land remained fallen in clear ruin.
      "Consider the Sultan of Turkey! He did not want war, but those like you desired it. When its fires were enkindled and its flames rose high, the government and the people were thereby weakened. Unto this beareth witness every man of equity and perception. Its calamities waxed so great that the smoke thereof surrounded the Land of Mystery(3) and its environs, and what had been revealed in the Tablet of the Sultan was made manifest. Thus hath it been decreed in the Book, at the behest of God, the Help in Peril, the Self-Subsisting.
      "O My Supreme Pen! Leave Thou the mention of the Wolf, and call Thou to remembrance the She-Serpent(4) whose cruelty hath caused all created things to groan, and the limbs of the holy ones to quake. Thus biddeth Thee the Lord of all names, in this glorious station. The Chaste One hath cried out by reason of thine iniquity, and yet thou dost imagine thyself to be of the family of the Apostle of God! Thus hath thy soul prompted thee, O thou who hast withdrawn thyself from God, the Lord of all that hath been and shall be. Judge thou equitably, O She-Serpent! For what crime didst thou sting the children of the Apostle of God, and pillage their possessions? Hast thou denied Him Who created thee by His command 'be, and it was'? Thou hast dealt with the children of the Apostle of God as neither Ad hath dealt with Hud, nor Thamud with Salih, nor the Jews with the Spirit of God,(3) the Lord of all being. Gainsayest thou the signs of thy Lord which no sooner were sent down from the heaven of His Cause than all the books of the world bowed down before them? Meditate, that thou mayest be made aware of thine act, O heedless outcast! Ere long will the breaths of chastisement seize thee, as they seized others before thee. Wait, O thou who hast joined partners with God, the Lord of the visible and the invisible. This is the day which God hath announced through the tongue of His Apostle. Reflect, that thou mayest apprehend what the All-Merciful hath sent down in the Qur'an and in this inscribed Tablet. This is the day whereon He Who is the Dayspring of Revelation hath come with clear tokens which none can number. This is the day whereon every man endued with perception hath discovered the fragrance of the breeze of the All-Merciful in the world of creation, and every man of insight hath hastened unto the living waters of the mercy of His Lord, the King of Kings. O heedless one! The tale of the Sacrifice(1) hath been retold, and he who was to be offered up hath directed his steps towards the place of sacrifice, and returned not, by reason of that which thy hand hath wrought, O perverse hater! Didst thou imagine that martyrdom could abase this Cause? Nay, by Him Whom God hath made to be the Repository of His Revelation, if thou be of them that comprehend. Woe betide thee, O thou who hast joined partners with God, and woe betide them that have taken thee as their leader, without a clear token or a perspicuous Book. How numerous the oppressors before thee who have arisen to quench the light of God, and how many the impious who murdered and pillaged until the hearts and souls of men groaned by reason of their cruelty! The sun of justice hath been obscured, inasmuch as the embodiment of tyranny hath been stablished upon the throne of hatred, and yet the people understand not. The children of the Apostle have been slain and their possessions pillaged. Say: Was it, in thine estimation, their possessions or themselves that denied God? Judge fairly, O ignorant one that hath been shut out as by a veil from God. Thou hast clung to tyranny and cast away justice; whereupon all created things have lamented, and still thou art among the wayward. Thou hast put to death the aged, and plundered the young. Thinkest thou that thou wilt consume that which thine iniquity hath amassed? Nay, by Myself! Thus informeth thee He Who is cognizant of all. By God! The things thou possessest shall profit thee not, nor what thou hast laid up through thy cruelty. Unto this beareth witness Thy Lord, the All-Knowing. Thou hast arisen to put out the light of this Cause; ere long will thine own fire be quenched, at His behest. He, verily, is the Lord of strength and of might. The changes and chances of the world, and the powers of the nations, cannot frustrate Him. He doeth what He pleaseth, and ordaineth what He willeth through the power of His sovereignty. Consider the she-camel. Though but a beast, yet hath the All-Merciful exalted her to so high a station that the tongues of the earth made mention of her and celebrated her praise. He, verily, overshadoweth all that is in the heavens and on earth. No God is there but Him, the Almighty, the Great. Thus have We adorned the heaven of Our Tablet with the suns of Our words. Blessed the man that hath attained thereunto and been illumined with their light, and woe betide such as have turned aside, and denied Him, and strayed far from Him. Praised be God, the Lord of the worlds! "

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Lawh-i-Burhán, Pages: 210-217)




      I could not find the Sources for these next two passages from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
'Should anyone, in the presence of the Manifestation, discover an evil intention on the part of any soul, he must not oppose him, but must leave him to God.'
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 164, p. 110.]

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"These, verily, are men who if they come to cities of pure gold will consider them not; and if they meet the fairest and most comely of women will turn aside."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 181, p. 124.]




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf which, as when Bahá'u'lláh quoted it earlier in this Tablet, is again word-for-word the same as its Source Tablet, Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet to Napoleon III.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Exultest thou over the treasures thou dost possess, knowing they shall perish? Rejoicest thou in that thou rulest a span of earth, when the whole world, in the estimation of the people of Baha, is worth as much as the black in the eye of a dead ant? Abandon it unto such as have set their affections upon it, and turn thou unto Him Who is the Desire of the world."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 181, pp. 124-125.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Exultest thou over the treasures thou dost possess, knowing they shall perish? Rejoicest thou in that thou rulest a span of earth, when the whole world, in the estimation of the people of Baha, is worth as much as the black in the eye of a dead ant? Abandon it unto such as have set their affections upon it, and turn thou unto Him Who is the Desire of the world. "
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Proclamation of Bahá'u'lláh, Tablet to Napoleon III, Page: 22)




      The only Source for this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf that I could find was in Prayers and Meditations. Since the passage from Prayers and Meditations is longer than this passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf it seems likely that this passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is not the Source for the passage in Prayers and Meditations, but that rather another Source was used for Prayers and Meditations. Though I do not know what this Source is, it is most likely the same Source Tablet which Bahá'u'lláh used in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Therefore, I have presented the quoted portion from that Tablet here. I could find no changes in wording between these two passages.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Glory to Thee, O my God! But for the tribulations which are sustained in Thy path, how could Thy true lovers be recognized; and were it not for the trials which are borne for love of Thee, how could the station of such as yearn for Thee be revealed?"
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 182, p. 125.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Glory to Thee, O my God! But for the tribulations which are sustained in Thy path, how could Thy true lovers be recognized; and were it not for the trials which are borne for love of Thee, how could the station of such as yearn for Thee be revealed "
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Prayers and Meditations, #XCII, Page: 155)




      Again, I could not find the Source for his next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, though from His introduction to the quoted passage, it would appear to have multiple Sources.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"In most of Our Tablets this most weighty exhortation hath been sent down from the heaven of His all-encompassing mercy. We said: "O concourse of rulers and divines! Incline your ears unto the Voice calling from the horizon of Akk
á. Verily, it aideth you to proceed aright, and draweth you nigh unto Him, and directeth your steps towards the station which God hath made the Dayspring of His Revelation and the Dawning-Place of His splendors. O peoples of the world! He Who is the Most Great Name is come, on the part of the Ancient King, and hath announced unto men this Revelation which lay hid in His knowledge, and was preserved in the treasury of His protection, and was written down by the Most Sublime Pen in the Books of God, the Lord of Lords. O people of Shin (Shiraz)! Have ye forgotten My loving-kindness and My mercy that have surpassed all created things, and which proceeded from God Who layeth low the necks of men?" "
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 187, pp. 127-128.]




      For this next section from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf Bahá'u'lláh quotes paragraphs 99-105 of The Kitáb-i-Aqdas. For easier reference I listed each of the quoted paragraphs from The Kitáb-i-Aqdas separately. Again the
changes in wording are few.

      The first change in wording appears to be one of translation—and indeed the two passages were translated by different translators. In paragraph 100 of The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, the Arabic/Persian word,"Sadratu'l-Muntaha," is used
untranslated, whereas in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Shoghi Effendi translates this word as "Tree beyond which there is no passing" which he has done in translations of other Tablets as well. Therefore, it is unlikely that this was actually a change in wording at all.

      The second change is one of Who is addressed. In paragraph 101 of The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Bahá'u'lláh writes, "O ye leaders of religion!". However, in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He narrows this down to " O ye leaders of religion in Persia!"

      The third and last change is the omission of the last part of paragraph 102 of The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, "Could ye but discover the source whence the splendour of this utterance is diffused, ye would cast away the peoples of the world and all that they possess, and would draw nigh unto this most blessed Seat of glory", from the passage in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "Say: O leaders of religion! Weigh not the Book of God with such standards and sciences as are current amongst you, for the Book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men. In this most perfect Balance whatsoever the peoples and kindreds possess must be weighed, while the measure of its weight should be tested according to its own standard, did ye but know it. The eye of My loving-kindness weepeth sore over you, inasmuch as ye have failed to recognize the One upon Whom ye have been calling in the daytime and in the night season, at even and at morn. Advance, O people, with snow-white faces and radiant hearts, unto the blest and crimson Spot, wherein the Tree beyond which there is no passing is calling: 'Verily, there is none other God beside Me, the Omnipotent Protector, the Self-Subsisting!' O ye leaders of religion in Persia! Who is the man amongst you that can rival Me in vision or insight?
      Where is he to be found that dareth to claim to be My equal in utterance or wisdom? No, by My Lord, the All-Merciful! All on the earth shall pass away; and this is the face of your Lord, the Almighty, the Well-Beloved. We have decreed, O people, that the highest and last end of all learning be the recognition of Him Who is the Object of all knowledge; and yet behold how ye have allowed your learning to shut you out, as by a veil, from Him Who is the Dayspring of this Light, through Whom every hidden thing hath been revealed. Say: This, verily, is the heaven in which the Mother Book is treasured, could ye but comprehend it. He it is Who hath caused the Rock to shout, and the Burning Bush to lift up its voice upon the Mount rising above the Holy Land, and proclaim: 'The Kingdom is God's, the sovereign Lord of all, the All-Powerful, the Loving!' We have not entered any school, nor read any of your issertations. Incline your ears to the words of this unlettered One, herewith He summoneth you unto God, the Ever-Abiding. Better is this for you than all the treasures of the earth, could ye but comprehend it. Whoso interpreteth what hath been sent down from the heaven of Revelation, and altereth its evident meaning, he, verily, is of them that have perverted the Sublime Word of God, and is of the lost ones in the Lucid Book."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 188, pp. 128-130.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Say: O leaders of religion! Weigh not the Book of God with such standards and sciences as are current amongst you, for the Book itself is the unerring Balance established amongst men. In this most perfect Balance whatsoever the peoples and kindreds of the earth possess must be weighed, while the measure of its weight should be tested according to its own standard, did ye but know it."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 99.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
      The eye of My loving-kindness weepeth sore over you, inasmuch as ye have failed to recognize the One upon Whom ye have been calling in the daytime and in the night season, at even and at morn. Advance, O people, with snow-white faces and radiant hearts, unto the blest and crimson Spot, wherein the Sadratu'l-Muntaha is calling: "Verily, there is none other God beside Me, the Omnipotent Protector, the Self-Subsisting!"
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 100.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O ye leaders of religion! Who is the man amongst you that can rival Me in vision or insight? Where is he to be found that dareth to claim to be My equal in utterance or wisdom? No, by My Lord, the All-Merciful! All on the earth shall pass away; and this is the face of your Lord, the Almighty, the Well-Beloved."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 101.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"We have decreed, O people, that the highest and last end of all learning be the recognition of Him Who is the Object of all knowledge; and yet, behold how ye have allowed your learning to shut you out, as by a veil, from Him Who is the Dayspring of this Light, through Whom every hidden thing hath been revealed. Could ye but discover the source whence the splendour of this utterance is diffused, ye would cast away the peoples of the world and all that they possess, and would draw nigh unto this most blessed Seat of glory."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 102)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Say: This, verily, is the heaven in which the Mother Book is treasured, could ye but comprehend it. He it is Who hath caused the Rock to shout, and the Burning Bush to lift up its voice, upon the Mount rising above the Holy Land, and proclaim: "The Kingdom is God's, the sovereign Lord of all, the All-Powerful, the Loving!"
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 103.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"We have not entered any school, nor read any of your dissertations. Incline your ears to the words of this unlettered One, wherewith He summoneth you unto God, the Ever-Abiding. Better is this for you than all the treasures of the earth, could ye but comprehend it."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 104.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Whoso interpreteth what hath been sent down from the heaven of Revelation, and altereth its evident meaning, he, verily, is of them that have perverted the Sublime Word of God, and is of the lost ones in the Lucid Book."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 105.)




      This next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is taken from the Preamble to Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of Ishráqát. Again the changes in wording are few.

      The first change in wording has to do with one of Bahá'u'lláh's declarations of the Attributes of God. In Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He says, "the Exalted, the Most High!, while in the Tablet of Ishráqát, He writes, "the Most High, the Most Glorious!"

      The second change may be one of translation, since the two terms, "save" used in one, and "except" used in the other, can be used interchangeably.

      The third change concerns a form of address: "They who reject the truth" in the Tablet of Ishráqát becomes "They that have gone astray" in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. Perhaps those who have gone astray have done so because they rejected the truth. The fourth and last change in wording has to do with verb tense. In one, Bahá'u'lláh writes "We hear", and in the other "We heard".

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "O thou who hast set thy face towards the splendors of My Countenance! Vague fancies have encompassed the dwellers of the earth and debarred them from turning towards the Horizon of Certitude, and its brightness, and its manifestations and its lights. Vain imaginings have withheld them from Him Who is the Self-Subsisting. They speak as prompted by their own caprices, and understand not. Among them are those who have said: 'Have the verses been sent down?' Say: 'Yea, by Him Who is the Lord of the heavens!' 'Hath the Hour come?' 'Nay, more; it hath passed, by Him Who is the Revealer of clear tokens! Verily, the Inevitable is come, and He, the True One, hath appeared with proof and testimony. The Plain is disclosed, and mankind is sore vexed and fearful. Earthquakes have broken loose, and the tribes have lamented, for fear of God, the Lord of Strength, the All-Compelling.' Say: 'The stunning trumpet blast hath been loudly raised, and the Day is God's, the One, the Unconstrained.' 'Hath the Catastrophe come to pass?' Say: 'Yea, by the Lord of Lords!' 'Is the Resurrection come?' 'Nay, more; He Who is the Self-Subsisting hath appeared with the Kingdom of His signs.' 'Seest thou men laid low?' 'Yea, by my Lord, the Exalted, the Most High!' 'Have the tree-stumps been uprooted?' 'Yea, more; the mountains have been scattered in dust; by Him the Lord of attributes!' They say: 'Where is Paradise, and where is Hell?' Say: 'The one is reunion with Me; the other thine own self, O thou who dost associate a partner with God and doubtest.' They say: 'We see not the Balance.' Say: 'Surely, by my Lord, the God of Mercy! None can see it except such as are endued with insight.' 'Have the stars fallen?' Say: 'Yea, when He Who is the Self-Subsisting dwelt in the Land of Mystery (Adrianople). Take heed, ye who are endued with discernment!' All the signs appeared when We drew forth the Hand of Power from the bosom of majesty and might. Verily, the Crier hath cried out, when the promised time came, and they that have recognized the splendors of Sinai have swooned away in the wilderness of hesitation, before the awful majesty of thy Lord, the Lord of creation. The trumpet asketh: 'Hath the Bugle been sounded?' Say: 'Yea, by the King of Revelation!, when He mounted the throne of His Name, the All-Merciful.'
      Darkness hath been chased away by the dawning-light of the mercy of thy Lord, the Source of all light. The breeze of the All-Merciful hath wafted, and the souls have been quickened in the tombs of their bodies. Thus hath the decree been fulfilled by God, the Mighty, the Beneficent. They that have gone astray have said: 'When were the heavens cleft asunder?' Say: 'While ye lay in the graves of waywardness and error.' Among the heedless is he who rubbeth his eyes, and looketh to the right and to the left. Say: 'Blinded art thou. No refuge hast thou to flee to.' And among them is he who saith: 'Have men been gathered together?' Say: 'Yea, by my Lord!, whilst thou didst lie in the cradle of idle fancies.' And among them is he who saith: 'Hath the Book been sent down through the power of the true Faith?' Say: 'The true Faith itself is astounded. Fear ye, O ye men of understanding heart!' And among them is he who saith: 'Have I been assembled with others, blind?' Say: 'Yea, by Him that rideth upon the clouds!' Paradise is decked with mystic roses, and hell hath been made to blaze with the fire of the impious. Say: 'The light hath shone forth from the horizon of Revelation, and the whole earth hath been illumined at the coming of Him Who is the Lord of the Day of the Covenant!' The doubters have perished, whilst he that turned, guided by the light of assurance, unto the Dayspring of Certitude hath prospered. Blessed art thou, who hast fixed thy gaze upon Me, for this Tablet which hath been sent down for thee—a Tablet which causeth the souls of men to soar. Commit it to memory, and recite it. By My life! It is a door to the mercy of thy Lord. Well is it with him that reciteth it at eventide and at dawn. We, verily, hear thy praise of this Cause, through which the mountain of knowledge was crushed, and men's feet have slipped. My glory be upon thee and upon whomsoever hath turned unto the Almighty, the All-Bounteous. The Tablet is ended, but the theme is unexhausted. Be patient, for thy Lord is patient."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 192, pp. 131-134.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "O thou who hast set thy face towards the splendours of My Countenance! Vague fancies have encompassed the dwellers of the earth and debarred them from turning towards the Horizon of Certitude, and its brightness, and its manifestations and its lights. Vain imaginings have withheld them from Him Who is the Self-Subsisting. They speak as prompted by their own caprices, and understand not. Among them are those who have said: 'Have the verses been sent down?' Say 'Yea, by Him Who is the Lord of the heavens!' 'Hath the Hour come?' 'Nay, more; it hath passed, by Him Who is the Revealer of clear tokens! Verily, the Inevitable is come, and He, the True One, hath appeared with proof and testimony. The Plain is disclosed, and mankind is sore vexed and fearful. Earthquakes have broken loose, and the tribes have lamented, for fear of God, the Lord of Strength, the All-Compelling.' Say: 'The stunning trumpet-blast hath been loudly raised, and the Day is God's, the One, the Unconstrained.' And they say: 'Hath the Catastrophe come to pass?' Say: 'Yea, by the Lord of Lords!' 'Is the Resurrection come?' 'Nay, more; He Who is the Self-Subsisting hath appeared with the Kingdom of His signs.' 'Seest thou men laid low?' 'Yea, by my Lord, the Most High, the Most Glorious!' 'Have the tree-stumps been uprooted?' 'Yea, more; the mountains have been scattered in dust; by Him the Lord of attributes!' They say: 'Where is Paradise, and where is Hell?'
      Say: 'The one is reunion with Me; the other thine own self, O thou who dost associate a partner with God and doubtest.' They say: 'We see not the Balance.' Say: 'Surely, by my Lord, the God of Mercy! None can see it except such as are endued with insight.' They say: 'Have the stars fallen?' Say: 'Yea, when He Who is the Self-Subsisting dwelt in the Land of Mystery. Take heed, ye who are endued with discernment!' All the signs appeared when We drew forth the Hand of Power from the bosom of majesty and might. Verily, the Crier hath cried out, when the promised time came, and they that have recognized the splendours of Sinai have swooned away in the wilderness of hesitation, before the awful majesty of thy Lord, the Lord of creation. The trumpet asketh: 'Hath the Bugle been sounded?' Say: 'Yea, by the King of Revelation! when He mounted the throne of His Name, the All-Merciful.' Darkness hath been chased away by the dawning light of the mercy of thy Lord, the Source of all light. The breeze of the All-Merciful hath wafted, and the souls have been quickened in the way by the dawning light of the mercy of thy Lord, the Source of all light. The breeze of the All-Merciful hath wafted, and the souls have been quickened in the tombs of their bodies. Thus hath the decree been fulfilled by God, the Mighty, the Beneficent. They who reject the truth have said: 'When were the heavens cleft asunder?' Say: 'While ye lay in the graves of waywardness and error.' Among the faithless is he who rubbeth his eyes, and looketh to the right and to the left. Say: 'Blinded art thou. No refuge hast thou to flee to.' And among them is he who saith: 'Have men been gathered together?' Say: 'Yea, by My Lord! whilst thou didst lie in the cradle of idle fancies.' And among them is he who saith: 'Hath the Book been sent down through the power of the true Faith?' Say: 'The true Faith Book been sent down through the power of the true Faith?' Say: 'The true Faith itself is astounded. Fear ye, O ye men of understanding heart!' And among them is he who saith: 'Have I been assembled with others, blind?' Say: 'Yea, by Him that rideth upon the clouds!' Paradise is decked with mystic roses, and hell hath been made to blaze with the fire of the impious. Say: 'The light hath shone forth from the horizon of Revelation, and the whole earth hath been illumined at the coming of Him Who is the Lord of the Day of the Covenant!' The doubters have perished, whilst he that turned, guided by the light of assurance, unto the Dayspring of Certitude hath prospered. Blessed art thou, who hast fixed thy gaze upon Me, for this Tablet which hath been sent down for thee - a Tablet which causeth the souls of men to soar. Commit it to memory, and recite it. By My life! It is a door to the mercy of thy Lord. Well is it with him that reciteth it at eventide and at dawn. We, verily, heard thy praise of this Cause, through which the mountain of knowledge was crushed, and men's feet have slipped. My glory be upon thee and upon whomsoever hath turned unto the Almighty, the All-Bounteous. The Tablet is ended, but the theme is unexhausted. Be patient, for thy Lord is patient. "

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Ishráqát, Preamble, Pages: 117-119)




      Continuing to quote from the preamble to His Tablet of Ishráqát, Bahá'u'lláh again presents very few changes in wording between His passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf and His Source Tablket. In fact, this time I could find only two.

      The first change involves a clarification, with the addition in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf of the phrase "soon after Our arrival in the prison-city of Akká," to "These are verses We sent down previously".

      The second and final change is the substitution in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf of "Our Cause" for "God" in the Tablet of Ishráqát.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
      "These are verses We sent down previously, soon after Our arrival in the prison-city of Akká, and We have sent them unto thee, that thou mayest be acquainted with what their lying tongues have spoken, when Our Cause came unto them with might and sovereignty. The foundations of idle fancies have trembled, and the heaven of vain imaginings hath been cleft asunder, and yet the people are in doubt and in contention with Him. They have denied the testimony of God and His proof, after He came from the heaven of power with the kingdom of His signs. They have cast away what had been prescribed, and perpetrated what had been forbidden them in the Book. They have abandoned their God, and clung unto their desires. They truly have strayed and are in error. They read the verses and deny them. They behold the clear tokens and turn aside. They truly are lost in strange doubt.
      "We have admonished Our loved ones to fear God, a fear which is the fountain-head of all goodly deeds and virtues. It is the commander of the hosts of justice in the city of Baha. Happy the man that hath entered the shadow of its luminous standard, and laid fast hold thereon. He, verily, is of the Companions of the Crimson Ark, which hath been mentioned in the Qayyum-i-Asmá.
      "Say: O people of God! Adorn your temples with the adornment of trustworthiness and piety. Help, then, your Lord with the hosts of goodly deeds and a praiseworthy character. We have forbidden you dissension and conflict in My Books, and My Scriptures, and My Scrolls, and My Tablets, and have wished thereby naught else save your exaltation and advancement. Unto this testify the heavens and the stars thereof, and the sun and the radiance thereof, and the trees and the leaves thereof, and the seas and the waves thereof, and the earth and the treasures thereof. We pray God to assist His loved ones, and aid them in that which beseemeth them in this blest, this mighty, and wondrous station."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 193-195, pp. 134-135.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "These are verses We sent down previously, and We have sent them unto thee, that thou mayest be acquainted with what their lying tongues have spoken, when God came unto them with might and sovereignty. The foundations of idle fancies have trembled, and the heaven of vain imaginings hath been cleft asunder, and yet the people are in doubt and in contention with Him. They have denied the testimony of God and His proof, after He came from the heaven of power with the kingdom of His signs. They have cast away what had been prescribed, and perpetrated what had been forbidden them in the Book. They have abandoned their God, and clung unto their desires. They truly have strayed and are in error. They read the verses and deny them. They behold the clear tokens and turn aside. They truly are lost in strange doubt.
      "We have admonished Our loved ones to fear God, a fear which is the fountainhead of all goodly deeds and virtues. It is the commander of the hosts of justice in the city of Baha. Happy the man that hath entered the shadow of its luminous standard, and laid fast hold thereon. He, verily, is of the Companions of the Crimson Ark, which hath been mentioned in the Qayyum-i-Asma.
      "Say: O people of God! Adorn your temples with the adornment of trustworthiness and piety. Help, then, your Lord with the hosts of goodly deeds and a praiseworthy character. We have forbidden you dissension and conflict in My Books, and My Scriptures, and My Scrolls, and My Tablets, and have wished thereby naught else save your exaltation and advancement. Unto this testify the heavens and the stars thereof, and the sun and the radiance thereof, and the trees and the leaves thereof, and the seas and the waves thereof, and the earth and the treasures thereof. We pray God to assist His loved ones, and aid them in that which beseemeth them in this blest, this mighty, and wondrous station."

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Ishráqát, Preamble, Pages: 119-121)




      The Source of this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is the same as the previous two passage, the Preamble to the Tablet of Ishráqát.

      The only change, which I found, is the change in the address. "O thou who hast fixed thy gaze upon My countenance!" is how it reads in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf while, in the Tablet of Ishráqát, it reads " O Jalil!" The rest of the quotes are word-for-word the same.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O thou who hast fixed thy gaze upon My countenance! Admonish men to fear God. By God! This fear is the chief commander of the army of thy Lord. Its hosts are a praiseworthy character and goodly deeds. Through it have the cities of men's hearts been opened throughout the ages and centuries, and the standards of ascendancy and triumph raised above all other standards."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 196, p. 136.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"O Jalil! Admonish men to fear God. By God! This fear is the chief commander of the army of thy Lord. Its hosts are a praiseworthy character and goodly deeds. Through it have the cities of men's hearts been opened throughout the ages and centuries, and the standards of ascendancy and triumph raised above all other standards."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Ishráqát, Preamble, Page: 121)




      Bahá'u'lláh continues to quote from the Preamble to the Tablet of Ishráqát in this next passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf. I found no changes in wording in the entire passage. They are again word-for-word the same.

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"We will now mention unto thee Trustworthiness and the station thereof in the estimation of God, thy Lord, the Lord of the Mighty Throne. One day of days We repaired unto Our Green Island. Upon Our arrival, We beheld its streams flowing, and its trees luxuriant, and the sunlight playing in their midst. Turning Our face to the right, We beheld what the pen is powerless to describe; nor can it set forth that which the eye of the Lord of Mankind witnessed in that most sanctified, that most sublime, that blest, and most exalted Spot. Turning, then, to the left We gazed on one of the Beauties of the Most Sublime Paradise, standing on a pillar of light, and calling aloud saying: 'O inmates of earth and heaven! Behold ye My beauty, and My radiance, and My revelation, and My effulgence. By God, the True One! I am Trustworthiness and the revelation thereof, and the beauty thereof. I will recompense whosoever will cleave unto Me, and recognize My rank and station, and hold fast unto My hem. I am the most great ornament of the people of Baha, and the vesture of glory unto all who are in the kingdom of creation. I am the supreme instrument for the prosperity of the world, and the horizon of assurance unto all beings.'
Thus have We sent down for thee that which will draw men nigh unto the Lord of creation."

      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 197, pp. 136-137.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"We will now mention unto thee Trustworthiness and the station thereof in the estimation of God, thy Lord, the Lord of the Mighty Throne. One day of days We repaired unto Our Green Island. Upon Our arrival, We beheld its streams flowing, and its trees luxuriant, and the sunlight playing in their midst. Turning Our face to the right, We beheld what the pen is powerless to describe; nor can it set forth that which the eye of the Lord of Mankind witnessed in that most sanctified, that most sublime, that blest, and most exalted Spot. Turning, then, to the left We gazed on one of the Beauties of the Most Sublime Paradise, standing on a pillar of light, and calling aloud saying: 'O inmates of earth and heaven! Behold ye My beauty, and My radiance, and My revelation, and My effulgence. By God, the True One! I am Trustworthiness and the revelation thereof, and the beauty thereof. I will recompense whosoever will cleave unto Me, and recognize My rank and station, and hold fast unto My hem. I am the most great ornament of the people of Baha, and the vesture of glory unto all who are in the kingdom of creation. I am the supreme instrument for the prosperity of the world, and the horizon of assurance unto all beings.' Thus have We sent down for thee that which will draw men nigh unto the Lord of
creation."

      (Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh, Ishráqát, Preamble, Pages: 121-122)




      For these final two quotes in Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh returns to The Kitáb-i-Aqdas for His Source. I found only one change in wording between each of these two passages and their Source passages. These changes involve the same phrase in both passages, the address, "O Land of Tá!". In the first passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, Bahá'u'lláh moves it to the beginning of the passage; in the second passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, He omits it altogether. The remainder of these passages are, however, word-for-word identical with their Source passages.
     
Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"O Land of Tá (Tihrán)! Let nothing grieve thee, for God hath chosen thee to be the source of the joy of all mankind. He shall, if it be His Will, bless thy throne with one who will rule with justice, who will gather together the flock of God which the wolves have scattered. Such a ruler will, with joy and gladness, turn his face towards, and extend his favors unto, the people of Baha. He indeed is accounted in the sight of God, as a jewel among men. Upon him rest forever the glory of God, and the glory of all that dwell in the kingdom of His revelation."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 216, p. 148.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Let nothing grieve thee, O Land of Tá,for God hath chosen thee to be the source of the joy of all mankind. He shall, if it be His Will, bless thy throne with one who will rule with justice, who will gather together the flock of God which the wolves have scattered. Such a ruler will, with joy and gladness, turn his face towards, and extend his favours unto, the people of Baha. He indeed is accounted in the sight of God as a jewel among men. Upon him rest forever the glory of God and the glory of all that dwell in the kingdom of His revelation."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 91.)

Passage from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf:
"Rejoice with great joy, O Land of Tá (Tihrán), for God hath made thee the dayspring of His light, inasmuch as within thee was born the Manifestation of His glory. Be thou glad for this name that hath been conferred upon thee—a name through which the Daystar of grace hath shed its splendor, through which both earth and heaven have been illumined. Erelong will the state of affairs within thee be changed, and the reins of power fall into the hands of the people. Verily, thy Lord is the All-Knowing. His authority embraceth all things. Rest thou assured in the gracious favor of thy Lord. The eye of His loving-kindness shall everlastingly be directed towards thee. The day is approaching when thy agitation will have been transmuted into peace and quiet calm. Thus hath it been decreed in the Wondrous Book."
      [Bahá'u'lláh, Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, par. 216, p.149.]

Passage from Earlier Source:
"Rejoice with great joy, for God hath made thee "the Dayspring of His light", inasmuch as within thee was born the anifestation of His Glory. Be thou glad for this name that hath been conferred upon thee - a name through which the Day-Star of grace hath shed its splendour, through which both earth and heaven have been illumined."
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 92.)

Passage from Earlier Source:
      "Erelong will the state of affairs within thee be changed, and the reins of power fall into the hands of the people. Verily, thy Lord is the All-Knowing. His authority embraceth all things. Rest thou assured in the gracious favour of thy Lord. The eye of His loving-kindness shall everlastingly be directed towards thee. The day is approaching when thy agitation will have been transmuted into peace and quiet calm. Thus hath it been decreed in the wondrous Book. "
      (Bahá'u'lláh, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, Par. 93.)




      These passages presented from Epistle to the Son of the Wolf must surely have some added significance to them since Bahá'u'lláh chose them to stress or support the points He was making in this Tablet. The extent of that added significance will have to be determined by each individual in their study of this Tablet and the rest of His Revelation. Nor does it mean that only these passages are significant to Bahá'u'lláh's Revelation. The revealed Word comes from God and, therefore, every word is significant whether or not Bahá'u'lláh (or anyone else for that matter) chooses to quote it.

      Another thing that makes these passages so special is that they represent a cross-section of His Writings. Bahá'u'lláh quotes from everything from His earliest Works, such as The Hidden Words, to the Book of His Laws, The Kitáb-i-Aqdas, to His Tablets to the Rulers of the world, to Tablets addressed to individual believers, and even from Tablets addressed to His avowed enemies, of which Epistle to the Son of the Wolf is itself one.
Back to:   Personal compilations Study Guides
Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
.
. .