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Search for tag "Heaven"

  1. from the Chronology
  2. from the Chronology Canada
  3. from the Main Catalog

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1852 Oct Bahá'u'lláh had a vision of the Maiden, who announced to Him that He was the Manifestation of God for this Age. [BBD142–3, 212; BKG823 ESW11–12, 21 GPB101–2; KAN62]

  • "While engulfed in tribulations I heard a most wondrous, a most sweet voice, calling above My head. Turning My face, I beheld a Maiden-" [SLH5-6]
  • This experience compares to the episode of Moses and the Burning Bush, Zoroaster and the Seven Visions, Buddha under the Bodhi tree, the descent of the Dove upon Jesus and the voice of Gabriel commanding Muhammad to ‘cry in the name of thy Lord'. [GPB93, 101]
  • The Báb repeatedly gave the year nine as the date of the appearance of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. The Declaration of the Báb took place in AH 1260; year nine was therefore AH 1269, which began in the middle of October when Bahá'u'lláh had been in prison for about two months. [CB46–7]
  • Subsequently in His Writings Bahá’u’lláh declared that He was the "Promised One" of all religions, fulfilling the messianic prophecies found in world religions. He stated that being several messiahs converging one person were the spiritual, rather than material, fulfilment of the messianic and eschatological prophecies found in the literature of the major religions. His eschatological claims constitute six distinctive messianic identifications: from Judaism, the incarnation of the "Everlasting Father" from the Yuletide prophecy of Isaiah 9:6, the "Lord of Hosts"; from Christianity, the "Spirit of Truth" or Comforter predicted by Jesus in His farewell discourse of John 14-17 and the return of Christ "in the glory of the Father"; from Zoroastrianism, the return of Shah Bahram Varjavand, a Zoroastrian messiah predicted in various late Pahlavi texts; from Shi'a Islam the return of the Third Imam, Imam Husayn; from Sunni Islam, the return of Jesus, Isa; and from the Bábí religion, He whom God shall make manifest.
  • While Bahá’u’lláh did not explicitly state Himself to be either the Hindu or Buddhist messiah, He did so in principle through His writings. Later, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated that Bahá’u’lláh was the Kalki avatar, who in the classical Hindu Vaishnavas tradition, is the tenth and final avatar (great incarnation) of Vishnu who will come to end The Age of Darkness and Destruction. Bahá’ís also believe that Bahá’u’lláh is the fulfilment of the prophecy of appearance of the Maitreya Buddha, who is a future Buddha who will eventually appear on Earth, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure Dharma. Bahá’ís believe that the prophecy that Maitreya will usher in a new society of tolerance and love has been fulfilled by Bahá’u’lláh's teachings on world peace. [Bahaipedia]
  • See P&M195-196 (1969), 298-299 (1987) where states, "...the First Call gone forth from His lips than the whole creation was revolutionized, and all that are in the heavens and all that are on earth were stirred to the depths". What was "the First Call"?. See GPB121, “These initial and impassioned outpourings of a Soul struggling to unburden itself, in the solitude of a self-imposed exile (many of them, alas lost to posterity) are, with the Tablet of Kullu’t-Tá’am and the poem entitled Rashh-i-‘Amá, revealed in Ṭihrán, the first fruits of His Divine Pen.”

      "While engulfed in tribulations I heard a most wondrous, a most sweet voice, calling above My head. Turning My face, I beheld a Maiden—the embodiment of the remembrance of the name of My Lord—suspended in the air before Me. So rejoiced was she in her very soul that her countenance shone with the ornament of the good pleasure of God, and her cheeks glowed with the brightness of the All-Merciful. Betwixt earth and heaven she was raising a call which captivated the hearts and minds of men. She was imparting to both My inward and outer being tidings which rejoiced My soul, and the souls of God’s honoured servants.

      Pointing with her finger unto My head, she addressed all who are in heaven and all who are on earth, saying: By God! This is the Best-Beloved of the worlds, and yet ye comprehend not. This is the Beauty of God amongst you, and the power of His sovereignty within you, could ye but understand. This is the Mystery of God and His Treasure, the Cause of God and His glory unto all who are in the kingdoms of Revelation and of creation, if ye be of them that perceive. This is He Whose Presence is the ardent desire of the denizens of the Realm of eternity, and of them that dwell within the Tabernacle of glory, and yet from His Beauty do ye turn aside." Súriy-i-Haykal para 6-7; SLH5-6

  • See Two Episodes from the Life of Bahá’u’lláh in Iran (2019) pp12-20 by Moojan Momen for an analysis of the provisional translation of a Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh. His interpretation is as follows: As a child Bahá’u’lláh read a story of the sufferings and unjust killing of the Banú Qurayza tribe in the time of Muhammad. It filled Him with such sorrow that He beseeched God to bring about what would be the cause of love and harmony among the people for the world. While imprisoned in the Siyáh Chál, He had an experience that caused great turmoil within Him and elevated His spiritual state. The duration of this state is considered as the beginning of His mission as a Manifestation of God and occurred over a twelve day period from 2 Muharram to 13 Muharram 1269, which equates to 16 October to 27 October 1852 A.D. It was after this that He began to reveal verses. Later He openly manifested Himself in the Garden of Ridván in Baghdad. Finally He revealed the Kitáb-i-Aqdas and then a series of Tablets such as Ishráqát, Tajalliyyát, the Tablet of the World and the Book of the Covenant in which he gave all of the guidance necessary to eliminate the causes of suffering, distress, and discord and to bring about unity and fellowship, thus fulfilling what He had longed for in His childhood.
  • Tihran; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Dreams and visions; Maid of Heaven; Angels; Year nine; Promised One; Prophecies; - Basic timeline, Condensed; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Basic timeline; Lawh Kullut-Taam (Tablet of All Food); Rashh-i-Ama (Sprinkling from the Cloud of Unknowing); Firsts, Other; Dreams
    1873 1 Mar Bahá'u'lláh revealed the Tablet of the Vision, "Lawh-i-Rú'yá" in Arabic. See the Provisional Translation by Stephan Lambden. Akka Lawh-i-Ruya (Tablet of the Vision); Bahaullah, Writings of; Maid of Heaven

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. Bahá'í Understanding of Reincarnation in Relation to the World's Faiths, A, by Sateh Bayat and Vafa Bayat, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 6 (2005). [about]
    2. Celestial Pavilion, Inmates of, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, 4 (2003). [about]
    3. Dawn over Mount Hira and Other Essays, by Marzieh Gail (1976). A collection of essays on various topics of interest to Baha'i studies and history. Most of these were first published in Star of the West and World Order between 1929 and 1971. [about]
    4. Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh for Bahá'í Holy Days, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Forty-five selections revealed for, or relating to, nine Bahá’í Holy Days. [about]
    5. Demystifying Bahá'u'lláh's Tablet of the Temple (Súratu'l-Haykal), by Hui Bau (2018). Background of the Suriy-i-Haykal: historical context and verses primarily from the first half of the surih, which feature the themes of the Body and Letters of the Temple, and Bahá’u’lláh’s introductory dialogues with two heavenly Maidens. [about]
    6. Erotic Imagery in the Allegorical Writings of Baha'u'llah, by John Walbridge (1997). Mystical symbolism in early Baha'i poetry. [about]
    7. Father and the Maiden, The: The Abrahamic Patriarchate and the Divine Feminine, by Mark A. Foster (1999). [about]
    8. Female Representations of the Holy Spirit in Bahá'í and Christian writings and their implications for gender roles, by Lil Osborn, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 4:1 (1994). A response to feminist theologian Mary Daly's argument that a male representation of God reinforces patriarchy with the suggestion that sexual equality is independent of, and unrelated to, gender images of the Divine. [about]
    9. Feminine Forms of the Divine in Bahá'í Scriptures, by Paula A. Drewek, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:1 (1992). Examples of the interaction between male and female principles in the writings. Complementarity of masculine and feminine images of divinity enriches our understanding of the divine–human encounter, but does not supplant the unity or unknowability of God. [about]
    10. Heaven, by Robert Stockman (1995). [about]
    11. Heaven in China without "Religion" and Manifestation, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Some believe there never was a time when humanity was without a Prophet to guide it, but as none is known in Chinese history, a Baha'i-Chinese dialogue needs a different starting point — one more inclusivist and with a different concept of "religion." [about]
    12. Heaven, Hell and the Afterlife, by Lynette Thomas, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). Judeo-Christian and Muslim views of life after death are often seen literally as bodily resurrection and a judgement day, vs. the Baha'i perspective of the nature of the soul and its existence after the death of the body, heaven/hell, and the afterlife. [about]
    13. Hidden Words: Allusion to Progressive Revelation in Persian HW #77, by Daryl Lowery (1999). Student paper, exploring one of the longest and more mystical Hidden Words. [about]
    14. Human Station in the Bahá'í Faith: Selected Sections: Philosophy and Knowledge of the Divine, by Ali Murad Davudi (2013). A collection of talks by the Bahá’í teacher and philosopher Dr. A. M. Dávúdí on selected philosophical topics, including one on the subject of the non-political nature of the Bahá’í Faith and non-involvement in partisan politics. [about]
    15. "In the Beginning Was the Word": Apocalypse and the Education of the Soul, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:4 (1993). [about]
    16. Introduction to the Súratu'l-Haykal (Discourse of The Temple), An, by Mohamad Ghasem Bayat, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
    17. Letters Written on Behalf of the Guardian, by Universal House of Justice, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). Three questions: Letters Written on Behalf of Shoghi Effendi; Status of Research Department Memoranda; Bahá'í Writings Based in Fact? [about]
    18. Paradise and Paradigm: Key Symbols in Persian Christianity and the Bahá'í Faith, by Christopher Buck (1999). Study of Baha'i and Christian symbology, the "first academic monograph comparing Christianity and the Baha'i Faith." [about]
    19. Role of the Feminine in the Bahá'í Faith, The, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 7:2 (1995). [about]
    20. Role of the Feminine in the New Era, The, by Marion Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    21. Seeing Double: The Covenant and the Tablet of Ahmad, by Todd Lawson, in Bahá'í Faith and the World's Religions (2005). The Tablet of Ahmad is believed to have special potency. "Seeing double" means both looking at the words of Scripture, and looking in the direction beyond the words, as indicated by the context. This paper also discusses the meaning of Covenant in Islam. [about]
    22. Symbolic Profile of the Bahá'í Faith, A, by Christopher Buck, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:4 (1998). [about]
    23. Tablet of Ahmad and Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Date of publications of translations of the Tablet of Ahmad and the Tablet of the Holy Mariner. [about]
    24. Tablet of the Deathless Youth, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). [about]
    25. Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Bahá'u'lláh. Complete tablet, both the Arabic (officially translated) and the Persian (provisionally translated) sections. [about]
    26. Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Bahá'u'lláh (1999). [about]
    27. Tablet of the Holy Mariner (Lawh-i-Malláhu'l-Quds): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Michael W. Sours and Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    28. Tablet of the Holy Mariner (Lawh-i-Malláhu'l-Quds): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    29. Tablet of the Holy Mariner (Lawh-i-Malláhu'l-Quds): Study Compilations, by Aziz Mboya (2000). Includes two compilations on references to the Lesser prophets, and mini-compilations on 44 topics: "angels," "apostles," "balance," "call of a prophet," "clouds," "Face of God," "trumpet," etc. [about]
    30. Tablet of the Maiden: Commentary on its translation, by Universal House of Justice (1997). Two letters on the mystical/symbolic content of Tablet of the Maiden, with comments on the translation by Juan Cole [about]
    31. Tablet of the Maiden, by Bahá'u'lláh (1999). A mystical vision about union with the beloved. [about]
    32. Tablet of the Temple (Súratu'l-Haykal), by John Walbridge, in Sacred Acts, Sacred Space, Sacred Time (1996). [about]
    33. Tablet of the Temple (Suratu'l-Haykal), by John Walbridge (1999). [about]
    34. Tablet of the Temple (Súratu'l-Haykal): Tablet study outline, by Jonah Winters (1999). [about]
    35. Tablet of the Vision, by Bahá'u'lláh (1999). [about]
    36. Tablet of Vision, by Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    37. Tablet to Amir Khan and Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Three letters about Abdu'l-Baha'is Tablet to Amír Khán; one letter about the Tablet of the Holy Mariner, the "Call of God," and Native American Prophets; short note from David Ruhe about Deganawida. [about]
    38. Themes of 'The Erotic' in Sufi Mysticism, by Jonah Winters, in Sutra Journal (2017). Mystical writing is replete with symbolism of love and eros, and it can also be found in the mystical poetry of Baha'u'llah. This paper provides background for that topic by surveying the use of themes of the erotic in writings by seven Sufi mystics. [about]
    39. Two Episodes from the Life of Bahá'u'lláh in Iran, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 20 (2019). Regarding the conference of Badasht and Baha'u'lláh's arrival at the shrine of Shaykh Tabarsi, and on His experience in the Siyah Chal, close attention to the text of two Tablets leads to conclusions that differ from current Baha'i history books. [about]
    40. Unveiling the Huri of Love, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 15:1-4 (2005). Three versions of this paper: Powerpoint presentation, audio file, and published article. [about]
     
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