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Search for tag "Revelation"

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from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1852 Oct Bahá'u'lláh had a vision of the Maiden, who announced to Him that He was the Manifestation of God for this Age. [BBD142–3, 212; BKG823 ESW11–12, 21 GPB101–2; KAN62]

  • "While engulfed in tribulations I heard a most wondrous, a most sweet voice, calling above My head. Turning My face, I beheld a Maiden-" [SLH5-6]
  • This experience compares to the episode of Moses and the Burning Bush, Zoroaster and the Seven Visions, Buddha under the Bodhi tree, the descent of the Dove upon Jesus and the voice of Gabriel commanding Muhammad to ‘cry in the name of thy Lord'. [GPB93, 101]
  • The Báb repeatedly gave the year nine as the date of the appearance of ‘Him Whom God shall make manifest'. The Declaration of the Báb took place in AH 1260; year nine was therefore AH 1269, which began in the middle of October when Bahá'u'lláh had been in prison for about two months. [CB46–7]
  • Subsequently in His Writings Bahá’u’lláh declared that He was the "Promised One" of all religions, fulfilling the messianic prophecies found in world religions. He stated that being several messiahs converging one person were the spiritual, rather than material, fulfilment of the messianic and eschatological prophecies found in the literature of the major religions. His eschatological claims constitute six distinctive messianic identifications: from Judaism, the incarnation of the "Everlasting Father" from the Yuletide prophecy of Isaiah 9:6, the "Lord of Hosts"; from Christianity, the "Spirit of Truth" or Comforter predicted by Jesus in His farewell discourse of John 14-17 and the return of Christ "in the glory of the Father"; from Zoroastrianism, the return of Shah Bahram Varjavand, a Zoroastrian messiah predicted in various late Pahlavi texts; from Shi'a Islam the return of the Third Imam, Imam Husayn; from Sunni Islam, the return of Jesus, Isa; and from the Bábí religion, He whom God shall make manifest.
  • While Bahá’u’lláh did not explicitly state Himself to be either the Hindu or Buddhist messiah, He did so in principle through His writings. Later, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated that Bahá’u’lláh was the Kalki avatar, who in the classical Hindu Vaishnavas tradition, is the tenth and final avatar (great incarnation) of Vishnu who will come to end The Age of Darkness and Destruction. Bahá’ís also believe that Bahá’u’lláh is the fulfilment of the prophecy of appearance of the Maitreya Buddha, who is a future Buddha who will eventually appear on Earth, achieve complete enlightenment, and teach the pure Dharma. Bahá’ís believe that the prophecy that Maitreya will usher in a new society of tolerance and love has been fulfilled by Bahá’u’lláh's teachings on world peace. [Bahaipedia]
  • See P&M195-196 (1969), 298-299 (1987) where states, "...the First Call gone forth from His lips than the whole creation was revolutionized, and all that are in the heavens and all that are on earth were stirred to the depths". What was "the First Call"?. See GPB121, “These initial and impassioned outpourings of a Soul struggling to unburden itself, in the solitude of a self-imposed exile (many of them, alas lost to posterity) are, with the Tablet of Kullu’t-Tá’am and the poem entitled Rashh-i-‘Amá, revealed in Ṭihrán, the first fruits of His Divine Pen.”

      "While engulfed in tribulations I heard a most wondrous, a most sweet voice, calling above My head. Turning My face, I beheld a Maiden—the embodiment of the remembrance of the name of My Lord—suspended in the air before Me. So rejoiced was she in her very soul that her countenance shone with the ornament of the good pleasure of God, and her cheeks glowed with the brightness of the All-Merciful. Betwixt earth and heaven she was raising a call which captivated the hearts and minds of men. She was imparting to both My inward and outer being tidings which rejoiced My soul, and the souls of God’s honoured servants.

      Pointing with her finger unto My head, she addressed all who are in heaven and all who are on earth, saying: By God! This is the Best-Beloved of the worlds, and yet ye comprehend not. This is the Beauty of God amongst you, and the power of His sovereignty within you, could ye but understand. This is the Mystery of God and His Treasure, the Cause of God and His glory unto all who are in the kingdoms of Revelation and of creation, if ye be of them that perceive. This is He Whose Presence is the ardent desire of the denizens of the Realm of eternity, and of them that dwell within the Tabernacle of glory, and yet from His Beauty do ye turn aside." Súriy-i-Haykal para 6-7; SLH5-6

  • See Two Episodes from the Life of Bahá’u’lláh in Iran (2019) pp12-20 by Moojan Momen for an analysis of the provisional translation of a Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh. His interpretation is as follows: As a child Bahá’u’lláh read a story of the sufferings and unjust killing of the Banú Qurayza tribe in the time of Muhammad. It filled Him with such sorrow that He beseeched God to bring about what would be the cause of love and harmony among the people for the world. While imprisoned in the Siyáh Chál, He had an experience that caused great turmoil within Him and elevated His spiritual state. The duration of this state is considered as the beginning of His mission as a Manifestation of God and occurred over a twelve day period from 2 Muharram to 13 Muharram 1269, which equates to 16 October to 27 October 1852 A.D. It was after this that He began to reveal verses. Later He openly manifested Himself in the Garden of Ridván in Baghdad. Finally He revealed the Kitáb-i-Aqdas and then a series of Tablets such as Ishráqát, Tajalliyyát, the Tablet of the World and the Book of the Covenant in which he gave all of the guidance necessary to eliminate the causes of suffering, distress, and discord and to bring about unity and fellowship, thus fulfilling what He had longed for in His childhood.
  • Tihran; Iran Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Dreams and visions; Maid of Heaven; Angels; Year nine; Promised One; Prophecies; - Basic timeline, Condensed; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Basic timeline; Firsts, Other; Dreams
    1852 (Between Oct - Nov) The revelation of Rashh-i-Ama (The Clouds of the Realms Above) while in the Síyáh-Chál in Tehran. This tablet is considered to be among the first revealed by Bahá'u'lláh after being apprised that He was to be the Manifestation of God.
  • See P&M295-196(1969), 298-299(1987) where states, "...the First Call gone forth from His lips than the whole creation was revolutionized, and all that are in the heavens and all that are on earth were stirred to the depths". What was "the First Call"?. See GPB121, “These initial and impassioned outpourings of a Soul struggling to unburden itself, in the solitude of a self-imposed exile (many of them, alas lost to posterity) are, with the Tablet of Kullu’t-Tá’am and the poem entitled Rashh-i-‘Amá, revealed in Ṭihrán, the first fruits of His Divine Pen.”
  • See also RoB1p45-52 for information on "The First Emanations of the Supreme Pen". Taherzadeh explains that this tablet has great significance in Islamic prophecy where it is said that when the Promised One appears He will utter one word that will cause the people to flee Him. Islamic prophecy also holds that the well-known saying, "I am He" will be fulfilled. In this tablet and many that were to follow, Bahá'u'lláh proclaims that "I am God".
    Taherzadeh also states Bahá'u'lláh disclosed for the first time one of the unique features of His Revelation, namely, the advent of the "Day of God".
    "In a language supremely beautiful and soul-stirring, He attributes these energies to Himself. His choice of words, and the beauty, power, depth and mystery of this poem...are such that they may well prove impossible to translate." [RoB1p45]
  • In 2019 an authorized translation of this poem was published in the collection The Call of the Divine Beloved.
  • See a study outline by Jonah Winters (1999).
  • See Clouds and the Hiding God: Observations on some Terms in the Early Writing of Bahá'u'lláh by Moshe Sharon published in Lights of Irfan, Vol 13, 2012,p363-379 for an exploration of the mystical terms found in the Tablet.
  • Tihran; Iran Rashh-i-Ama (Sprinkling from the Cloud of Unknowing); Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Poetry of; Poetry; Call of the Divine Beloved (book); Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Bahaullah, Birth of revelation of
    1857 c. The revelation of Sahíiy-i-Shattíyyih (Book of the River or Book of the Tigris) by Bahá'u'lláh.
  • See Tablet of the River [Tigris] by Bahá'u'lláh translated by Juan Cole, 1997 for the background to the Tablet and a translation. Cole contends, by his translation, that at this time Bahá'u'lláh, had no thought of advancing any claim to Revelation.
  • See Concealment and Revelation in Bahá'u'lláh's Book of the River by Nader Saiedi published in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:3, 1999 where Saiedi postulates, based on his translation that Bahá'u'lláh was fully aware of His mission from at least the time of his imprisonment in the Siyah-Chal and rejects any suggestion that Bahá'u'lláh's consciousness evolved in this regard.
  • See Messianic Concealment and Theophanic Disclosure by Moojan Momen published in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 Association for Bahá'í Studies of New Zealand, 2007, where Momen contends that the controversy is an illusory one caused by the specific nature of the meaning of the word "amr" and that the phrase that is the subject of dispute proves neither side's case, however it is translated. He explains it by say there is a theological schematic of the stages of the evolution of the mission of the Manifestations of God, the phenomenon of a period of messianic concealment followed by a theophanic disclosure. He then imposes this schematic upon the dispensation of the Báb creating a new interpretation of His ministry and further suggests it could be applied to the Revelation of Muhammad and Jesus.
  • Baghdad; Iraq Shahifiy-i-Shattiyyih (Book of the River); Rivers; Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of; Bahaullah, Declaration of; Tigris river
    1951 30 Nov Shoghi Effendi announced plans for the Great Jubilee commemorating the centenary of the birth of the Revelation of Bahá’u’lláh in the Síyáh-Chál. [BW12:24–6, 115–16; MBW16–18] Haifa Great Jubilee; Centenaries; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of
    1952 8 Oct Holy Year, "The Great Jubilee", October 1952 to October 1953, was inaugurated. [MBW16-18; BW12:116; DG84; PP409–10; SBR170–1]
  • Centenary celebrations of the birth of Bahá’u’lláh’s mission were initiated. [MBW16–18]
  • "Shoghi Effendi began the Holy Year to commemorate the centenary of Bahá’u’lláh's experience in the Siyáh Chál in October 1952 and closed the Holy Year in October 1953 (which corresponds to the centenary of the “Year Nine”, the Islamic year 1269)". [Two Episodes from the Life of Bahá’u’lláh in Iran p21 by Moojan Momen]
  • Four international conferences were scheduled in Kampala, Wilmette (dedication of the Temple), Stockholm and New Delhi. [SETPE2p31-43]
  • For a brief description of the Kampala Conference see CG20-21.
  • Kampala; Uganda; Wilmette; United States; Stockholm; Sweden; New Delhi; India Great Jubilee; Holy Years; Centenaries; Bahaullah, Birth of Revelation of; Siyah Chal (Black Pit)
    2017 6 Nov - 22 Jan An exhibition of Bahá'u'lláh’s writings opened at the John Addis Gallery in the British Museum.
  • One of the central themes was the power of the Word, which refers to divine revelation, a concept fundamental to the origins of all the world’s great faiths. The exhibition showed original handwriting of Bahá'u'lláh, as well as other archival items associated with His life such as His reed pens and examples of "revelation writing" by His scribe as he tried keep up with Bahá'u'lláh's dictation.
  • The exhibition, timed to commemorate the period of celebration of the 200th anniversary of His birth, was open to the public until the 22nd of January. [BWNS1220]
  • See the British Museum blog entitled Displaying the Bahá'í Faith: the pen is mightier than the sword.
  • London; United Kingdom British Museum and British Library; Exhibitions of Bahai manuscripts and relics; Relics; Bahaullah, Writings of; Exhibitions; Reed pens; Reed (general); Calligraphy; Revelation writing; Mirza Aqa Jan; Tajalliyat (Effulgences); Kalimat-i-Maknunih (Hidden Words); Bahaullah, Pen portraits of; Pen portraits; Edward Granville Browne; Gifts

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. 'Abdu'l-Baha: A Biblical Figure?, by Combiz Nuri (2009). Biblical prophecies that could relate to Abdu'l-Baha and the Seventh Angel of the Apocalypse, and the nature of the Covenant. [about]
    2. Answered Questions, Some, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2014). New 2014 translation (with a version side-by-side with the original). [about]
    3. Antinomies of Reason and the Theology of Revelation: Some Preliminary Thoughts, by Nader Saiedi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:4 (1998). [about]
    4. Apocalypse Unsealed, by Robert Riggs (1981). Early draft of the later book Apocalypse - An Exegesis. [about]
    5. Apocalypse Unsealed, The: Some thoughts on the use of Christian Scripture in the Bahá'í community, by Robert Riggs: Review and Commentary, by Sen McGlinn (2002). On Baha'i use of Biblical literature, especially interpretations of end-time symbolism and the Book of Revelation. [about]
    6. Apocalypse, The: An Exegesis, by Robert Riggs (1998). Detailed study of astrology, numerology, and other esoterica, in an attempt to understand The Revelation of St. John the Divine through eyes of Baha'i interpretation. [about]
    7. Aspects of the Bahá'í Teachings, Conditions for Membership, and Voting Rights: Seven various questions, by Universal House of Justice (1991). On Baha'i status and community membership, spiritual primacy, Most Great Spirit, studying the Covenant, revelation of the Bab, civil elections, and definition of a pioneer. Includes short compilation "Conditions for Membership in the Baha'i Community." [about]
    8. Bahá'í Apocalypticism: The Concept of Progressive Revelation, by Zaid Lundberg (1996). Progressive revelation is part of a coherent system of apocalypticism. Paper includes discussion of theology, cosmology, and prophetology. [about]
    9. Bahá'í Approach to the Claim of Finality in Islam, A, by Seena Fazel and Khazeh Fananapazir, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:3 (1993). Survey of the terms "prophet" and "seal," and a Baha'i reconciliation of these terms with progressive revelation. [about]
    10. Bahá'í Faith and Islam (2013). Overview of connections and contrasts between the Baha'i Faith and its parent religion. [about]
    11. Baha'i Faith and Syncretism, The, by Robert Stockman, in Resource Guide for the Scholarly Study of the Bahá'í Faith (1997). Addresses the common misunderstanding that the Bahá'í Faith is syncretistic. [about]
    12. Bahá'í Worldview on Unity of Religions: Progressive Revelation, The: Principles and Insights from the History of Science, by Jena Khadem Khodadad, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 10 (2009). [about]
    13. Bahá'u'lláh's Symbolic Use of the Veiled Ḥúríyyih, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Analyzing some of the meanings behind the appearance of the Veiled Maiden, as alluded to by Bahá'u'lláh in His letters. [about]
    14. Baha'u'llah's Unity Paradigm: A Contribution to Interfaith Dialogue on a Global Ethic?, by Udo Schaefer, in Dialogue and Universalism, 6:11-12 (1996). The mystic unity of religions and the concept of progressive revelation. [about]
    15. Bedrock of Bahá'í Belief, The: The Doctrine of Progressive Revelation, by Zaid Lundberg, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). [about]
    16. Beyond the Clash of Religions: The Emergence of a New Paradigm, by Udo Schaefer (1998). Religious pluralism and associated issues: diversity and unity of religions, absoluteness, relativity of truth, New Age thought, and interfaith dialogue [about]
    17. Biblical Verses, Interpretation of, by Universal House of Justice (1986). Interpretation of Biblical verses. Includes chart showing all references in the Baha'i writings to verses in the Book of Revelation. [about]
    18. Book of Revelation Revealed in Glory, The: A Summary of Glorious Revelation, by William Ridgers, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). Bahá'í interpretation of St. John's Book of Revelation. [about]
    19. Dashavatara and Progressive Revelation, by Anupam Premanand, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 11 (2010). [about]
    20. Dei Verbum: Un punto di vista bahá'í della Costituzione Dogmatica Cattolica Romana sulla Rivelazione Divina, by Marco Oliveira (1999). Lo scopo di questa presentazione è quello di discutere alcune basilari credenze cristiane cattoliche sulla Rivelazione Divina e spiegare le sue differenze e somiglianze con la Fede bahá’í. [about]
    21. Dei Verbum: A Bahá'í Perspective on the Roman Catholic Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, by Marco Oliveira, in Lights of Irfan, 20 (2019). On some basic Christian Catholic beliefs on divine revelation, how the Baha'i Faith views Christianity, and theological differences and similarities between the two. [about]
    22. Doctrine of Progressive Revelation in the Baha'i Faith, by Daniil V. Pivovarov, in Journal of Siberian Federal University, 4:1 (2011). On the ideological basis of progressive revelation, views of Baha'u'llah and his followers on the nature of a prophet, and the mission of great prophets. [about]
    23. Essays on Jesus and the New Testament, by Peter Terry (2015). Scripture and progressive revelation, canonization of the Bible, teachings of the New Testament, Baha'i interpretations of the Bible, Apostles of Jesus, and prophecies of Jesus and their fulfilment. [about]
    24. From Adam to Bahá'u'lláh: The Idea of a Chain of Prophecy, by Zaid Lundberg, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). [about]
    25. Hidden Words: Allusion to Progressive Revelation in Persian HW #77, by Daryl Lowery (1999). Student paper, exploring one of the longest and more mystical Hidden Words. [about]
    26. Hindu Concept of God, The: Unity in Diversity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The fundamental unity behind Hindu concepts of God and those found in the Semitic traditions, and the principle of unity in diversity, allow Hindu and Baha'i beliefs to come together and further their common goal of uniting the world's religions. [about]
    27. I Daniel: Index, by Bruce Limber (1999). An index to the contents of Robert Riggs' book I, Daniel. [about]
    28. I know Not How to Sing Thy Praise: Reflections on a Prayer of Bahá'u'llah, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Theology and the language of revelation vs. atheism and scientific discourse, and apophatic "not-knowing" vs. the impossibility of knowing god. [about]
    29. I, Daniel, by Robert Riggs (1998). Spiritual, metaphorical, and esoteric teachings from the Bible's book of Daniel. [about]
    30. Kitab-i-Iqan: Key to Unsealing the Mysteries of the Holy Bible, by Brent Poirier (1998). Examination of the Bible in light of interpretations of its symbolism offered by Baha'u'llah's Kitab-i-Iqan. [about]
    31. L'histoire de Salut et Changement de Paradigme: Deux Contributions à la Théologie Bahá'íe, by Udo Schaefer (1993). French translation of Beyond the Clash of Religions: The Emergence of a New Paradigm. [about]
    32. L'islam, religion éternelle?: une approche bahá'íe de la revendication à la complétude, by Seena Fazel and Khazeh Fananapazir (1993). French translation of "A Bahá'í Approach to the Claim of Finality in Islam." [about]
    33. List of Articles on BahaiTeachings.org, by Christopher Buck (2014). List of online essays and articles by Christopher Buck. [about]
    34. Major Themes of the Creative Word: Series of Books for Deepening and Studying, by Melanie Smith and Paul Lample (1987). Five activity books "designed to draw the student into a study of the profound concepts found in the Bahá’í Revelation." Youth Can Move the World, The Significance of Bahá’u’lláh’s Revelation, Spiritual Conquest of the Planet, The Covenant, etc. [about]
    35. Mark of the Beast and Implanted Computer Chips, by Universal House of Justice (1998). Concerns about implanted computer chips as the "Mark of the Beast," and the response of individual Baha'is to government. [about]
    36. Messianic Concealment and Theophanic Disclosure, by Moojan Momen, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). [about]
    37. Notes on Bahá'í Proofs Based on the Bible, Some (1963). First published (as a book) in Africa in 1963, reprinted in India in 1988. [about]
    38. Oneness of Reality, The: A Response to Moojan Momen's "Relativism as a Basis for Baha'i Metaphysics", by Peter Terry (2018). Dialogue on epistemology and ontology as presented in the core literature of the Baha’i religion. [about]
    39. Progressive Revelation, by Robert Stockman (1995). [about]
    40. Prolegomenon to the Study of Babi and Baha'i Scriptures, A: The Importance of Henry Corbin to Babi and Baha'i Studies, by Ismael Velasco, in Bahá'í Studies Review, Vol. 12 (2004). On the foremost Western authority on the Islamic philosophy of Persia, one of the most influential Islamicists of the 20th century, whose work is uniquely relevant in understanding the philosophical context for the emergence of the Babi Faith. [about]
    41. Religion and Exclusivism: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). [about]
    42. Revelation, Interpretation, and Elucidation in the Baha'i Writings, by Robert Stockman, in Scripture and Revelation, ed. Moojan Momen (1997). [about]
    43. Short Films, Music, and Prayers, by Alan Bryson (2020). Link to "Irenic Visuals," a YouTube channel with Baha'i music and prayers, and short films on Bahiyyih Khanum, Lorna Byrne, interfaith dialogue, Juliet Thompson, and Kahlil Gibran. [about]
    44. Spiritual Footprints in the Sands of Time, by Kevin Brogan, in Solas, 3 (2003). The covenantal relationship between God and humankind; the lives of the founders of Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, and Buddhism; the societies in which these religions developed; and some of their common features. [about]
    45. Sprinkling from a Cloud (Rashh-i-Amá): Wilmette Institute faculty notes, by Ismael Velasco and Julio Savi (1999). [about]
    46. Unity and Progressive Revelation: Comparing Bahá'í Principles with the Basic Concepts of Teilhard de Chardin, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 5 (2004). [about]
    47. "What I Want to Say is Wordless": Mystical Language, Revelation and Scholarship, by Ismael Velasco, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). [about]
    48. Why Are We Here: Meaning of Life: Warwick Leaflets, by Warwick Bahá'í Bookshop (2003). [about]
    49. Word is the Master Key for the Whole World, The: The Bahá'í Revelation and the "Teaching and Spirit of the Cause" in Dialogical and Personal Thinking, by Wolfgang A. Klebel, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). [about]
     
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