Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.
 

Search for location "Rhodesia"

  1. from the Chronology
  2. from the Chronology Canada
  3. from the Main Catalogue
Search on wikis:

from the Chronology

date event locations tags see also
1925 (In the year) Fanny Knobloch and her sister Pauline Hannen were the first Bahá’ís to visit Southern Rhodesia. Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) Fanny Knobloch; Pauline Hannen
1952 Feb Eric Manton and his son Terry arrived in Northern Rhodesia (Zambia), the first Bahá’ís to settle in the country. They settled in the Copperbelt region from where he was able to raise a number of native believers who took the Faith to other parts of Zambia. [A Brief Account of the Bahá'í Faith in Africa Since 1953 by Nance Ororo-Robarts and Selam Ahderrom p2]
  • The first local convert was Christopher Mwitumwa in 1954. [Wikipedia]
  • Northern Rhodesia; Zambia First travel teachers and pioneers; Eric Manton; Terry Manton
    1953 Oct Claire Gung arrived in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and was named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. She spent 18 months in Salisbury (Harare) where she was a member of the first local spiritual assembly. [CG161] Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Jan Kenneth and Roberta Christian arrived in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and were named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Kenneth Christian; Roberta Christian; Knights of Bahaullah
    1954 Feb Joan Powis arrived in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and was named a Knight of Bahá’u’lláh. [BW13:456] Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe Knights of Bahaullah
    1955 Ridván The first local spiritual assembly in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) was formed in Salisbury (Harare). [CG21] Salisbury (Harare); Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) Local Spiritual Assembly
    1963. 20 Apr The number of believers in East and Central Africa numbered well over 40.000 with half of these in the Congo. Similar growth could be seen in countries like British Cameroons, Ethiopia, and Northern Rhodesia. Bahá'ís now resided in well over 30 countries and territories, and consisted largely of tribal peoples that had entered the Faith through the combined efforts of international and native pioneers. The end of the Ten Year Crusade left Africa spiritually and politically transformed. Devoted individuals, operating in daunting conditions, had succeeded in establishing the Faith on the continent while preparing for the next phase in its advancement—continued large-scale expansion would be accompanied by the formation and strengthening of the foundational institutions of the Faith. [A Brief Account of the Progress of the Bahá'í Faith in Africa Since 1953 by Nancy Oloro-Robarts and Selam Ahderom p6-7] Africa; Congo; British Cameroon; Ethiopia; Northern Rhodesia Statistics; Shoghi Effendi, Works of
    1964 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of South and West Africa that was formed in 1956, was altered and two additional national assemblies were formed, the National Spiritual Assembly of the Indian Ocean,(Mauritius, Réunion and Madagascar) and the National Spiritual Assembly of South Central Africa and leaving the altered South and West Africa leaving only Angola, Basutoland, St. Helena, South West Africa, South Africa and Swaziland.

    The National Spiritual Assembly of South Central Africa was formed with its seat in Salisbury had jurisdiction over the following countries: Northern Rhodesia, Malawi (formerly changed in 1964 from Nyasaland), Southern Rhodesia, and Botswana (formerly Bechuanaland; name changed in 1966). [BW14p96; BW15:195; BN no608 November 1981 p11]

  • The National Spiritual Assembly of the Indian Ocean included Mauritius, the Chagos Archipelago, Madagascar, the Malagasy Republic, Seychelles, Comoros and Réunion. [BN no608 November 1981 p11]
  • Salisbury; Northern Rhodesia; Nyasaland (Malawi); Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe); Zimbabwe; Bechuanaland National Spiritual Assembly, formation
    1970 Ridván The National Spiritual Assembly of Southern Rhodesia was formed with its seat in Salisbury. [BW15:200]
  • The name of the country was changed to Zimbabwe on the 18 April 1980. The name of the capital was change to Harare in the second anniversary of the country's independence from the UK.
  • Salisbury; Rhodesia National Spiritual Assembly, formation
    1975 Dec The first International Youth School to be held in Rhodesia took place near Bulawayo. [BW16:155] Bulawayo; Rhodesia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1976 10 – 15 Jan The first National Bahá’í Children’s School to he held in Rhodesia took place in Salisbury. [BW16:155] Salisbury; Rhodesia Bahai Childrens school
    1985 6 Feb The passing of Claire Gung (b. 3 November, 1904, Gladbeck, Ruhrgebeit, Germany, d. Kampala, Uganda). She was buried in The National Bahá'í Cemetery of Uganda. [BW19p653-657]
  • She had worked as a children's nurse or housekeeper in Germany, switzerland, Austria, the Italian tyrol, Belgium, Holland and finally settled in England in 1930. She became a Bahá'í in Torquay and after a time in Eastleigh, Dovon, later joined the small Bahá’í group in Cheltenham in 1940. She moved to the Manchester area and later pioneered to Northampton in November 1946 to become member of the first Spiritual Assembly there. In 1948 she again pioneered to help form the first Spiritual Assembly in the “Pivotal Centre” of Cardiff then to Brighton and to Belfast. In 1947 she became a naturalized British subject. In 1950, during the “Year of Respite”, Claire became the first pioneer to actually move from the British community to settle in Africa when Shoghi Effendi called for Bahá'ís to open Africa. She sailed on the "Warwick Castle" on 4 (or 25) January, 1951 and landed in Tanzania where she obtained a post as assistant matron in a school in Lushoto,150 miles from Dar-es-Salaam. [CG158-159]
  • She became a "Knight" for Rhodesia. Mr. Zahrai was actually the first Bahá'í to come to Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) during a Ten Year Crusade. He was followed soon after by Claire Gung, Eyneddin and Tahirih Ala'i, Kenneth and Roberta Christian and Joan Powis. All seven received the accolade of Knight of Baha'u'llah from Shoghi Effendi. Subsequently the Guardian gave her the title, "Mother of Africa".
  • Later she moved to Uganda where she started a Kindergarten school. She was affectionately known as "Auntie Claire".
  • After being in the country since 1957 Auntie Claire was granted he certificate of residence for life from the Republic of Uganda date the 11th of May, 1978. [CG118] [BWNS275; Wikipedia; Wikipedia; Historical Dictionary of the Bahá'í Faith p.209; UD211, 482]
  • Also see Claire Gung Mother of Africa by Adrienne Morgan and published by the National Spiritual Assembly of Baha'is of South Africa; (1997).
  • Rhodesia; Zimbabwe; Uganda; Tanzania In Memoriam; Knights of Bahaullah; Claire Gung; Auntie Claire; Eyneddin Alai; Tahirih Alai; Ken Christian; Roberta Christian

    from the Chronology Canada

    no results
     
    See all locations, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    • Locations are simplified spellings used to find documents on a similar topic but with various titles.
    • Searches match parts of a location: searching for state will also show United States.
    • 1- and 2-letter words will not be searched.
    • Please contact us if you can help add locations.
    Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
    .
    . .