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Search for tag "Government"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1863. 27 Mar Bahá'u'lláh met the deputy governor in a mosque opposite the Government House where the Farmán which had been sent by the Sultán was announced to Him and advised that He and His family were to be exiled to an unknown destination. Námiq Páshá, the governor of Baghdad, could not bring himself to meet Bahá'u'lláh and give Him this news in person. At first he summoned Him to the courthouse but when He refused to attend he asked Him to meet in the mosque. [CH81-82,BKG154–5; GPB147–8; RB1:229]
  • See BKG155–6 and GPB148 for the effect of this news on the believers.
  • Bahá'u'lláh and His family had been given Ottoman citizenship by this time. [BBRSM66]
  • See BKG156–8 for a list of those chosen by Bahá'u'lláh to migrate with Him.
  • See TN50–3 for the story of the sedition behind Bahá'u'lláh's removal from Baghdád.
  • Fearful of Bahá'u'lláh's growing influence in Baghdád, the Persian Consul-General, Mirza Burzurg Khan, had made representation to the Sultan to have Him delivered to the Persian authorities. The Sultan, although the Caliph of Sunni Islam, considered himself a mystical seeker and was no doubt intrigued with Bahá'u'lláh from the reports of the Governor of 'Akká, Námiq Páshá, and his own Prime Minister, 'Alí Páshá. This combination of sympathy and interest led the Ottoman government to invite Him to the capital rather than send Him to a remote location or return Him to Persia to an uncertain fate. [BBD196; BBIC13, 57note 68; RoB1p142-147]
  • Baghdad; Iraq; Istanbul (Constantinople); Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Bahaullah, Banishment of; Governors; Namiq Pasha; Ottoman citizenship; Ottoman government
    1867. Apr The appeal by 53 Bahá'ís "in Baghdád" addressed to the United States Congress arrived at the American Consulate in Beirut. [BBR265, Petition from the Persian Reformers]
  • Also see An 1867 Petition from Bahá'ís in Shushtar, Iran, to the U.S. Congress translated by Manuchehr Derakhshani and Nesreen Akhtarkhavari.
  • Baghdad; Shushtar Petitions; United States government; Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Other; Persecution 1867 Petition
    1867. c. Aug Bahá'u'lláh refused to draw the allowance granted Him by the Ottoman government. [RB2:327]
  • Mírzá Yahyá had twice petitioned the government to convince it that he ought to be the recipient of the allowance. [RB2:327]
  • Bahá'u'lláh sold some of His belongings to provide the necessities for Himself and His dependents. [RB2:327]
  • Edirne (Adrianople); Turkey Bahaullah, Life of; Ottoman government; Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal)
    1968. Jul The meaning of "Just Government" was clarified by The Universal House of Justice. The reply sent to an individual called attention to a letter to a believer dated September 7, 1937 in which the beloved Guardian said:
      "As regards the Bahá'í principle of obedience to just governments, what is meant here by just is recognized and well-established authority."
    The Universal House of Justice further stated that in a letter to the National Teaching Committee for Central America dated July 3, 1948, the beloved Guardian, in explaining the statement in the Master's Will, said:
      "What the Master's statement really means is obedience to a duly constituted government, whatever that government may be in form. We are not the ones, as individual Bahá'ís to judge our government as just or unjust - for each believer would be sure to hold a different viewpoint, and within our own Bahá'í fold a hotbed of dissension would spring up and destroy our unity. We must build up our Bahá'í system, and leave the faulty systems of the world to go their way. We cannot change them through our becoming involved in them; on the contrary, they will destroy us."
    The same believer who asked about the meaning of "just government" also asked whether or not Bahá'ís should own or buy guns to protect themselves and their families. The Universal House of Justice replied:
      "Under the present circumstances in the United States it is preferable that Bahá'ís not buy or own arms for their protection or the protection of their families."
    [National Bahá'í Review No 7 July 1968 p2]
    BWC Just Government; guns
    1982 25 May The Subcommittee on Human Rights and International Organizations of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the United States House of Representatives heard the testimony of six witnesses concerning the persecution of the Bahá’ís in Iran. [BW18:172]
  • See A Congressional resolution: Protesting Iran's Bigotry. [World Order, Series 2, Volume_17 Issue 1 p9-14]
  • See as well [World Order, Series 2, Volume_16 Issue 3]
  • Washington DC; United States; Iran Human Rights; Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Other; Persecution; United States government
    1999 5 May Firuz Kazemzadeh, Secretary for External Affairs for the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the United States, was appointed by President Clinton as a member of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom. White House Press Release United States Firuz Kazemzadeh; NSA; United States government; United States Commissions; Religious freedom; Human rights Find ref

    from the main catalogue

    1. 1867 Petition from Bahá'ís in Shushtar, Iran, to the U.S. Congress, An, in World Order, 37:3 (2006). A petition sent by Bahá'ís in Persia in 1867 to the US Consulate general, seeking assistance in getting Bahá'u'lláh released from imposed exile. Includes introduction, prepared on behalf of the US NSA. [about]
    2. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Encounter with Modernity during His Western Travels, by Wendi Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Abdu'l-Bahá's responses to the West's technology and innovations on the one hand, vs. its archaic racist and sexual philosophies on the other. [about]
    3. Additional Prayers Revealed by 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2018). [about]
    4. Avoidance of Politics and Controversial Matters, by Universal House of Justice (2003-01-12). A short explanation that the aim of Bahá'ís is to reconcile viewpoints and heal divisions, but not become involved with disputes of the many conflicting elements of society around them. Includes introductory letter from the US NSA, and a compilation. [about]
    5. Bahá'í Approach to Non-Involvement in Partisan Political Activity, by Shoghi Effendi and Universal House of Justice (2022-10). Resource for individual and group study, in light of the current civil and political unrest in the U.S., Iran, and the world; reasons for the Bahá’í stance against partisan activity and its approach to social change; Bahá'í use of social media. [about]
    6. Bahá'í Prayers for Good Governance, by Christopher Buck, in Journal of Ecumenical Studies, 56:4 (2021 Fall). Bahá’u’lláh encouraged Bahá’ís to pray for their rulers. This essay presents a newly authorized translation of "A Prayer for the confirmation of the American Government," and a provisional translation of a prayer of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá for the Ottoman Caliphate. [about]
    7. Bahá'í-Inspired Perspectives on Human Rights (2001). Articles by Kiser Barnes, Greg Duly, Cheshmak Farhoumand-Sims, Graham Hassall, Darren Hedley, Nazila Ghanea-Hercock, Chichi Layor, Michael Penn, Martha Schweitz, and Albert Lincoln. [about]
    8. Bahá'ísm, the religion of brotherhood and its place in the evolution of creeds, by Francis Henry Skrine (1912). An outsider's sympathetic portrayal of the Bahá'í history and teachings, written with "express approval" of Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    9. Church and State: Book 1 of a Postmodern Political Theology for the Bahá'í Community, by Sen McGlinn, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, 19 (2005). Religion and politics in Islamic history; Islamic and Bahá'í views on theocracy and democracy; the theology of the State and the unfoldment of world civilization; relevant contemporary Bahá'í literature in English, French, and German. [about]
    10. Church and State in the Bahá'í Faith: An Epistemic Approach, by Roshan Danesh, in Journal of Law and Religion, 24:1 (2008). On the public role of Bahá'í institutions; review of current secondary literature; temporal legitimacy vs. divine sovereignty; interaction of religion and politics; maturation and unity; an open vision of church and state. [about]
    11. Church and State in the World Order of Baha'u'llah, by Sen McGlinn (1994-11-06). The concept of theocracy as it applies to the Bahá'í model of government. [about]
    12. Fifty Three Years In Syria, by Henry H. Jessup (1910). Passing encounters between Bahá'ís and a Christian missionary in Iran, 1867-1901. [about]
    13. Heart of the Gospel: The Bible and the Bahá'í Faith, by George Townshend (1939). Using only the text of the Bible, Townshend provides a new reading of Scripture as a guidebook for those who seek a universal view of religion and the contemporary world. [about]
    14. Just System of Government: The Third Dimension to World Peace, by John Huddleston, in The Bahá'í Faith and Marxism (1987). Highlights a few points in the Bahá'í approach to government and collective action. [about]
    15. Kirk, Durbin Introduce Resolution Condemning Iran's Continued Persecution of Bahá'í Minority, by Mark Kirk and Dick Durbin (2013-03-12). In recognition of the five-year anniversary of imprisonment of Bahá'í leaders in Iran, senators meet with their family members and friends and introduce a joint resolution calling attention to this persecution. [about]
    16. Mark of the Beast and Implanted Computer Chips, by Universal House of Justice (1998-08-12). Concerns about implanted computer chips as the "Mark of the Beast," and the response of individual Bahá'ís to government. [about]
    17. Obedience to Civil Authority, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States, in The Bahá'í National Review, 32 (1970-08). A statement on the problem of whom one should obey when there is apparent conflict between the immediate civil authority under which one resides and a superior authority, such as a state or the Federal Government. [about]
    18. One Planet, One Habitation: A Bahá'í Perspective on Recasting Humanity's Relationship with the Natural World, by Bahá'í International Community (2022-06-01). A pictorial magazine-style overview of Bahá'í views on the environment, trusteeship, development, progress, and spirituality. [about]
    19. Petition from the Persian Reformers (1867). A petition sent by Bahá'ís in Baghdad and Shushtar, Iran, in 1867 to the US Consulate general, seeking assistance in getting Bahá'u'lláh released from imposed exile. [about]
    20. Political Non-Involvement and Obedience to Government: Compilation by Peter Khan with Cover Letter from Secretariat, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi (2003-01-12). Current world events can cause confusion and anguish among those seeking global peace. Rather than being drawn into prevailing attitudes and disputes, Bahá'ís must hold a broader long-term perspective. [about]
    21. Reason and the Bahá'í Writings: The Use and Misuse of Logic and Persuasion, by Ian Kluge (2001-09-02). How to study the Bahá'í Writings through the use of logic. [about]
    22. Relating the Faith to Current Issues, by Peter J. Khan (1986). Short essay outlining an approach to relate the teachings to current thoughts and problems of humanity. [about]
    23. Relationship to Government, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Three short sections: Loyalty to the government, the Bahá'í view of pacifism, and the Guardian's instructions regarding military service. [about]
    24. Supreme Tribunal (Mahkamiy-i-Kubra), by Ali Nakhjavani, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Meaning of "Bahá'í Court" in the writings of the Guardian and how it compares with the General Assembly of the United Nations. [about]
    25. The Role of Public Institutions in Ensuring Social Well-Being, by Alex Vedovi, in Bahá'í World (2020-05). Questions around government’s role in social welfare and the welfare state; Bahá'í perspectives on the government's role in supporting well-being; taxation, wealth, and poverty; [about]
    26. Theocracy and Separation of Church and State, by Universal House of Justice (1995-04-27). On theocracy in relation to the Bahá'í model of government, and issues relating to the development of the Bahá’í Administrative Order. [about]
    27. War, Governance, and Conscience in This Age of Transition, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States, in The Bahá'í National Review, 20 (1969-06). A whitepaper on issues of Bahá'í involvement in the military services. [about]
     
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