Bahá'í Library Online
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Search for tag "Social media"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
2011 21 Mar The launch of "Half Light Media". The mandate of this not-for-profit entity was to serve the Bahá'í Faith through the arts and various avenues of media. Founder Naysan Naraqi was assisted by fellow board members Collis Ta'eed and Fuad Ta'eed and scores of collaborators.
  • Their flagship project was called "Bahá'í Blog" but it was more than a blog. It was a knowledge repository with almost 1,500 articles by more than 100 contributors. It was also a Video Bank with its own YouTube Channel. Through “Studio Sessions”, they invited Bahá'ís and their friends to film and record themselves singing/playing something based on the Bahá'í Writings.
  • Baha’i Blogcast with host Rainn Wilson was a collection of interviews with Bahá'ís and their friends. They established a presence on Sound Cloud where one could listen or download talks and music that appeared on the site.
  • There was a page where they showcased photography, design and imagery from around the web that focused on the Bahá'í Faith and Spirituality themes and another called Personal Reflections, a project that captured portraits of people coupled with excerpts from interviews with them about how the Bahá'í Faith had touched their lives.
  • There was a calendar page and and another for quizzes where one could challenge oneself on a variety of topics.
  • Another service they provided was a directory with links to Official Bahá'í Sites, Non-Government Organizations, Education and Training sites, Blogs, Publications and Communities as well as other Bahá'í resources.
  • Internet; Social media; Naysan Naraqi; Collis Taeed; Fuad Taeed; Rainn Wilson

    from the main catalogue

    1. Administrative Order, Suggestions about changes in , by Universal House of Justice (1995). Ways in which Bahá'ís may make suggestions for change within the Bahá'í administration, and the nature of internet discussions. [about]
    2. Bahá'í Participation on the Internet: Some Reflections, by Bahá'í Internet Agency (2006). Forms of online participation; the Internet as a new and foreign culture; using spiritual principles to guide online action and teaching. [about]
    3. Blogging and the Bahá'í Faith: Suggestions and Possible Approaches, by Bahá'í Internet Agency (2006). Guidance on blogging and the 5-year plan, finding an audience, possible topics, placement and promotion, and podcasting. [about]
    4. Digital Citizenship: The New Citizenship, by Boris Handal, in Mobile Makes Learning Free (2016). This book chapter discusses the need for introducing the notion of virtues and spiritual attitudes in the delivery of learning experiences fostering digital citizenship values from a Bahá'í perspective. [about]
    5. Guidelines for Internet Communication, by Bahá'í Internet Agency and Universal House of Justice (2008). Includes compilation "Extracts on Internet Communication Written on Behalf of the Universal House of Justice," spiritual principles, and Bahá'í netiquette. [about]
    6. Internet Communications; Virgin Birth; Encyclopedia; Administrative Order, by Universal House of Justice (1996). Questions on email discussion groups and the Covenant, the Bahá'í stance on the Virgin Birth of Christ, the spirituality of administrating, the spiritual destiny of the American Bahá'í community, and the status of the Bahá'í Encyclopedia. [about]
    7. Internet Discussions, Character of, by Universal House of Justice (1995). Internet courtesy, discipline, and the need for Bahá'ís online to be a "spiritual leaven." [about]
    8. Internet Guidance, by Bahá'í Internet Agency (2004). Links to a variety of guidelines for online media: responding to opposition online; how to do podcasting and blogging; netiquette; SEO and hosting websites; using social networking sites; compilation on Internet communications; PowerPoint presentations. [about]
    9. Internet, Defending the Cause against Opponents on, by Universal House of Justice (2001). The nature of opposition to the Bahá'í Faith, and how to respond to it in internet media. [about]
    10. Laymen vs. Scholars in Bahá'í Studies, by Universal House of Justice (1996). No distinction should be drawn between "laypeople" and "scholars" in Bahá'í studies, and the pursuit of knowledge. [about]
    11. One Common Faith, by Universal House of Justice (2005). Review of relevant passages from both the writings of Bahá'u'lláh and the scriptures of other faiths against the background of contemporary crises. [about]
    12. Personal Websites, Audiences, and Use of Language on the Internet, by Universal House of Justice (2015). Letter to an NSA on strengthening the official Bahá'í presence on the Internet; individual initiatives vs. global audiences; use of the word "Bahá'í" in personal sites; the use of moderate and courteous language. [about]
    13. Responding to Criticism and Opposition on the Internet, by Bahá'í Internet Agency (2009). Bahá’ís welcome constructive examination of their Faith. While they should not engage in exchanges that are divisive or contentious, Bahá’ís will not hesitate to respond, in a spirit of courtesy and fairness, to serious misrepresentations of their Faith. [about]
    14. soc.religion.bahai: Complete Archives (1992). Link to an 18-year archive of the first moderated Bahá'í newsgroup. [about]
     
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