Bahá'í Library Online
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Documents published in Singapore Baha'i Studies Review

  1. Bahá'í Faith and the Singapore Women's Movement, The: Challenges for the Next Millennium, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). On the relationship between religion and the fight for women's rights after the founding of the Singapore Council of Women; the interplay between gender, religion and the women's movement; challenges for the next millennium with regards to equality. [about]
  2. Bahá'í Guidelines to Healing and the Role of Homoeopathy, by Mozhdeh Foo, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). Principles of the homeopathic system of medicine, and comparison of them with the fundamentals of health and healing outlined in writings of Baha'u'llah and 'Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
  3. Body, Mind, Soul and Spirit, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The Baha'i view of human nature involves an interaction between spirit, soul and body — these three elements exist both in the Semitic religions and in the Far Eastern ones; Western dualist and Eastern monist traditions are in fact all tripartite. [about]
  4. Brothers and Sisters: Buddhism in the Family of Chinese Religion, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The endurance of Confucianism for 2,000 years is partly because Buddhism and Taoism were content to play a subordinate role and not infringe upon the "Chinese Great Tradition"; implications of Buddhism's role in relation to new religions in China. [about]
  5. Challenge of Change for the Chinese in Southeast Asia, The, by Yin Hong Shuen, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Chinese Bahá'ís in some Asian countries are a microcosm of Chinese people in this region. An email survey asked what attracts Southeast Asians to the Faith, difficulties they face, and how adopting a world religion helps guide their future challenges. [about]
  6. Chinese Family Religion and World Religion, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Principles of filial piety and ancestor worship as practised in Chinese tradition; maintenance of genealogies and moral instruction of children with traditions of their forebears and "ancestral cults" help to reinforce the lineage and family solidarity. [about]
  7. Chinese Religions: Evolution, Compatibility and Adaptability - A Historical Perspective, by Kow Mei Kao, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Case study of the history of Chinese civilization through the formation of the three major religions in imperial China: Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism; their compatibility, adaptability, and mutual influences in their early development. [about]
  8. Crossing Religious Boundaries: Interfaith Challenges for the Future, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Baha'i approach to inter-religious harmony: coming together with other faiths in the search for truth; understanding that there are relativistic elements to faith; testing theology by its moral effects; propagating religious truth by the force of example. [about]
  9. Dialogue Among Civilizations: Ancient and Future, Transitions and Potentials, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Many ideas in Chinese civilization resonate with Bahá'í thought. The I Ching highlights differences between western and eastern philosophy, the notion of embodiment in the Confucian view of the noble person, and transforming material to spiritual. [about]
  10. Dialogue between Yin-Yang Concepts and the Bahá'í Faith, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Yin-yang, a pivotal theory in Chinese thought influencing government, architecture, relationships, and ethics, has many similarities with the Bahá’í Faith, including the origin of matter, the nature of history, man-woman relationships, and health. [about]
  11. Divine Qualities of Spiritual Dialogue, by Piya Tan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). The Buddhist basis for dialogue is found in its four virtues: love (the world as an extended family), compassion (listening to others), altruistic joy (learning from their success and beliefs) and equanimity (courage to accept the spirituality of others). [about]
  12. Emergence of the Bahá'í Faith in Singapore (1950-1972), The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). The first two decades of the Faith in Singapore, from the arrival of pioneers in 1950 to the formation of the NSA in 1972; the activities of the LSA of Singapore; strategies used to proclaim the existence of the Faith; features of the early community. [about]
  13. Future of Confucianism, The, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The history of Confucianism, its teachings, a critique of its place in the modern world, its future, and its survival into the 21st century. [about]
  14. Heaven in China without "Religion" and Manifestation, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Some believe there never was a time when humanity was without a Prophet to guide it, but as none is known in Chinese history, a Baha'i-Chinese dialogue needs a different starting point — one more inclusivist and with a different concept of "religion." [about]
  15. Heaven, Hell and the Afterlife, by Lynette Thomas, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). Judeo-Christian and Muslim views of life after death are often seen literally as bodily resurrection and a judgement day, vs. the Baha'i perspective of the nature of the soul and its existence after the death of the body, heaven/hell, and the afterlife. [about]
  16. Hindu Concept of God, The: Unity in Diversity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The fundamental unity behind Hindu concepts of God and those found in the Semitic traditions, and the principle of unity in diversity, allow Hindu and Baha'i beliefs to come together and further their common goal of uniting the world's religions. [about]
  17. Human Spirit in Moral Education, The, by Kuek Yi Hsing, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Historical perspectives that have led to the immanence of secular models of moral education in Europe and the U.S., how Singapore has taught moral education, secular models from the U.S. and their inadequacies, and what the Baha'i Faith can offer. [about]
  18. Introduction to the Doctrines of Soul and Enlightenment in Mahayana Buddhism and the Bahá'í Faith, An, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The development of Mahayana and how the Chinese people adopted and adapted it; non-self/enlightenment vs. the "True Poverty and Absolute Nothingness" of the Seven Valleys; sunyata/emptiness and Buddhist monism vs. the Valley of Unity's nonduality. [about]
  19. Jesus the Son of God and the Incarnation Doctrine, by Antonella Khursheed and Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). The Baha'i approach to the sonship and divinity of Christ is consistent with Old and New Testament usage. It examines the Incarnation Doctrine, the roots of which can be traced to pagan influences coloring Christian belief in its early centuries. [about]
  20. Language of the Heart, The: Parallels between Chinese and Bahá'í Approaches to the Spiritual Self, by Sim Tze Hong, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Parallels between Chinese and Confucian thought vs. Bahá'í teachings about the spiritual self, the nature of the heart, the pathway to perfection, the knowledge of oneself, and symbolism in language like "open heart" and "use heart." [about]
  21. Life, Death and Immortality: The Taoist Religion in Singapore and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Main features of Taoist practices in Singapore compared with Baha'i which, at first glance, could not be more disparate; whether unity may be found behind the apparent dichotomy; spanning the gulf between these two distinct religions from different times. [about]
  22. Medieval Islam: The Influence of Islam on Judaism and Christianity, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Prior to the Renaissance, Islam inspired revivals in the cultural traditions of Christianity and Judaism, indicating a harmony between the three religions. The reforms inspired by Islam were a prelude to the modern scientific revolution. [about]
  23. Missing Moral Dimension, The, by Suresh Sahadevan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Today's social and economic policies are materially efficient and technically sound, but something vital is missing: graciousness within and between individuals. It may not directly result in revenue or productivity, but is crucial in the long run. [about]
  24. Mystic Journey of the Soul, The, by Gul Afroz Zaman, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). On the journey a soul must make to attain union with the Eternal from the confines of material life on earth; Christian and Sufi esoteric traditions vs. Baha'i mysticism; the central theme of attaining a "Heavenly Homeland" and closeness with the Creator. [about]
  25. Obituary: Antonella Khursheed (1958-2000), by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Bio of the co-founder and secretary of the Singapore Association for Bahá'í studies, who organized every annual Singapore ABS conference. [about]
  26. On the Nature of Bahá'í Communities, by Check Woo Foo, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). Reflections on the development of Baha'i communities in urban societies, especially the relationship between the individual believer, the local community, and the Institutions, in the context of achieving an advance in the process of entry by troops. [about]
  27. Purposeful Spiritual Endeavour: A fundamental Connection between Bahá'ís and Christians, by Colin Quin, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). There is a need for clearer, warmer, more purposeful connections between individuals of different Faiths; we each have similar concerns with our own human needs, aspirations, and religious devotion, and seek deeper understanding of the ideas we value. [about]
  28. Rationality in Academic Disciplines, by K. P. Mohanan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). For an academic community to construct knowledge through teamwork, its members must have a shared language with the same pairings of concepts and words, and they must have shared epistemic values by which to "dialogue" and base collective decisions. [about]
  29. Religion in the Modem World, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). On aspects of the Western secular rebellion against theocracy and the rise of free enquiry and freedom of conscience through the lens of the European Reformation and Galileo’s conflict with the Papacy; religion's role in strengthening family unity. [about]
  30. Revivification of the Buddha's Dharma, The, by Jamshed K. Fozdar, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). The unrivaled impact of the Buddha's teachings upon Asian spirituality, his fundamental motivations, and the recurrence of the "Buddha-rising" — the returning advent of the Divine Teacher, the Maitreya-Amitabha. [about]
  31. Science and Religion in Chinese Culture, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Religion lies at the root of philosophy and civilization during the Tang (618-907) and Sung (960-1279) dynasties. Cultural achievements during these periods were influenced by Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism, but modern sciences did not develop. [about]
  32. Selected Talks and Statements on Interfaith Issues by Religious Leaders and Scholars, by George Townshend and Swami Vivekananda, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Compilation of addresses to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Inter-Religious Organisation of Singapore; also includes talks by Jonathan Sacks, Abdullah Yusof Ali, Robert Runcie, and Pope John Paul II. [about]
  33. Soul in Chinese and Bahá'í Belief, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). On Chinese religions and the Baha'i Faith; their beliefs in the presence of a soul and an afterlife; the nature of the soul and the human being; the human quest for happiness and meaning in life; free will and its relation to justice. [about]
  34. Spiritual Foundations of Science, The, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 1 (1996). In contrast to modern western accounts of science, which reduce it to methods of logic and experiment, the Baha'i reference point is the spiritual nature of man. The experience of some outstanding scientists of the past supports the Baha'i view. [about]
  35. Understanding the Human Condition: Secular and Spiritual Perspectives, by Suresh Sahadevan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Both materialist and religious paradigms are important for happiness and for informing our decisions about how to live fruitful lives. Religion must work for the betterment of the world by applying spiritual concepts to solve contemporary problems. [about]

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