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Search for tag "Mysticism"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1853 -1863 During this period Bahá'u'lláh revealed His mystical Writings. Baghdad; Iraq Bahaullah, Writings of; Mysticism
1854 10 Apr - 1856 19 Mar Bahá'u'lláh in Sulaymaniyyih
Bahá'u'lláh suddenly left Baghdád and went to the mountainous wilderness of Sar Galu, around Sulaymaniyyah in Iraqi Kurdistán. [BKG115-122; DB585; GPB120-124; TN38; CH256; KI250-251; AB392]
  • Before He left, Bahá'u'lláh asked His family to look after Mírzá Yahyá during His absence. [CB70–1; CH50–1,]
  • Bahá'u'lláh lived for some time as a dervish in a cave on the mountain of Sar-Galú. He took the name Darvísh Muhammad-i-Írání to conceal His true identity. [BBD214–15; BBRSM:60–1; BKG116–19; GPB120–1; TN38–9]
  • See photo.
  • This action compares to Moses' going out to the desert of Sinai, to Buddha's retreat to the wilds of India, to Christ's walk in the wilderness and to Muhammad's withdrawal to the hills of Arabia. [BKG114]
  • Áqá Abu'l-Qásim-i-Hamadání was His only companion. Áqá Abu'l-Qásim was killed by thieves on a journey to collect money and provisions. [BKG116–17]
  • "It was this period of voluntary seclusion, following shortly after the execution of the Báb in 1850, which bequeathed to history irrevocable proof that Bahá'u'lláh and not His half-brother, Subhi-Ezel, was, in reality, the one celebrated by the Báb and for whom the Bábí Movement was the spiritual preparation. By this act of voluntary retirement, Bahá'u'lláh gave Sebhi-Ezel unhampered opportunity to exercise the spiritual leadership over the Bábís which the latter claimed as his right. The result, however, demonstrated Subhi-Ezel's utter incapacity to maintain unity among the Bábís, inspire them with faith and confidence sufficient to meet their many difficulties and guide them along lines of true future progress. Nonother than the return of Bahá'u'lláh could re-quicken the flames of their ardour or supply them with the more universal principles of conduct and faith required to transform the Bábí Movement into a world religion." [BW2Surveyp33]
  • It was during this time that Bahá'u'lláh revealed the poem Qasídiyi-i-‘Izz-i-Varqá'íyyih (Ode of the Dove). It was composed of 2,000 couplets but Bahá'u'lláh allowed only 127 to be preserved. [BBD215; BKG118; GPB123]
  • See BKG114, GPB117–19 and K1250 for reasons for Bahá'u'lláh's retirement.
  • Before and during His absence no fewer than 25 people claimed to be the One promised by the Báb. [BBRSM29, 59; EB269; GPB125]
    • As his position as nominal head deteriorated Mírzá Yahyá became more desperate, he had one such claimant, Mírzá Asadu'lláh Khí'í Dayyán, assassinated around 1856. [Bahá'u'lláh and the Naqshbandí Sufis in Iraq by Juan Cole p4]
  • See BKG115–19 and GPB120 for Bahá'u'lláh's activities while in Kurdistán.
  • See KI248–51 for Bahá'u'lláh's own account of the episode.
  • See BKG119–22 and GPB124–6 for the condition of the Bábí community in Baghdád during this period.
  • The son born to Navváb shortly after the family's arrival in Baghdád became ill and died during Bahá'u'lláh's absence. [CB71; CH51–2]
  • See SBBR2:1–28 for Bahá'u'lláh's contact with Súfís.
  • BW16:528 for an account of Daoud Toeg, who visited the caves of Sar-Galú and photographed them in August of 1940.
  • Also see Bahá'í News No 145 July 1941 p11 and 12.
  • Kurdistan; Baghdad; Sulaymaniyyih; Iraq Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Life of; Dervishes; Sulaymaniyyih; Sar-Galu; Aqa Abul-Qasim-i-Hamadani; Poetry; Qasidiyyih-Varqaiyyih (Ode of the Dove); Navvab (Asiyih Khanum); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Sufism; Mysticism; Daoud Toeg; Caves; Interfaith dialogue; Bahaullah, Basic timeline; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Life of; Sulaymaniyyih; Dayyan (Mirza Asadullah)
    1858 – 1862 It was in this period that Bahá'u'lláh revealed the Seven Valleys (Haft Vadi)in response to a request from a Súfí, Shaykh Muhyi'd-Dín, the Qádí of Khániqayn, whom He may have met in Kurdistán. In it Bahá'u'lláh described the "seven stages which the soul of the seeker must needs traverse ere it can attain the object of its existence." These seven stages were originally proposed by the great Persian Sufi poet Shaykh Faridu'd-Din Attar (d1230C.E) in his renowned work the Mantiqu't-Tayr (The Conference of the Birds.) [BBS94; GPB140; BBD206; BBRSM:64; SA150; BKG161-163; RoB1p98-101]
  • For details of the composition and content of the Seven Valleys see SA150.
  • Baghdad; Iraq; Kurdistan Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Life of; Haft Vadi (Seven Valleys); Seven Valleys; Call of the Divine Beloved (book); Sufism; Mysticism; Shaykh Muhyid-Din; - Basic timeline, Condensed; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Basic timeline
    2019 5 Feb The announcement of the publication of The Call of the Divine Beloved by the Bahá'í World Centre. The book contained revised translations of The Seven Valleys and The Four Valleys as well as five newly published selections from Bahá’u’lláh’s writings, including Rashḥ-i-‘Amá (The Clouds of the Realms Above). This tablet is considered to be among the first if not the first revealed by Bahá'u'lláh after being apprised that He was to be the Manifestation of God.
  • For more information about this Tablet and its significance see 1852 (between Aug - Nov).
  • BWC Call of the Divine Beloved (book); Haft Vadi (Seven Valleys); Chahar Vadi (Four Valleys); Rashh-i-Ama (Sprinkling from the Cloud of Unknowing); Bahaullah, Writings of; Publications; Translation; BWNS; Mysticism

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Commentary on the Qur'ánic Verses Concerning the Overthrow of the Byzantines: The Stages of the Soul, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 2 (2001). Commentary on the first few verses of the Quranic Sura of Rum; nine esoteric or mystical interpretations of the word al-Rum, transl. "Rome" or "Byzantium"; different types of soul; the soul's progress through the realms of creation. [about]
    2. Absolute Poverty and Utter Nothingness, by Rodney H. Clarken, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). Bahá’u’lláh’s ideas of poverty as detachment, and nothingness as selflessness. Cites some commonalities in concepts of detachment and nothingness from Buddha, Confucius, Jesus, Muhammad and Socrates as five of the greatest philosophers or prophets. [about]
    3. Alice Buckton: Baha'i Mystic, by Lil Osborn (2014). Buckton, a central figure in the re-establishment of Glastonbury as England's spiritual centre, visited Abdul Baha in Egypt and received him at her home in Surrey, and visited the U.S. to help spread the Bahá'í movement. [about]
    4. Alice Buckton's Glastonbury Pilgrimage, by Lil Osborn (2020). Buckton's spiritual awakening and pioneering activities in Glastonbury, including her setting up a womens' and pilgrims' hostel, and the Pilgrimage of Avalon. [about]
    5. Ancient Poems as Means of Revelation, in an Early Tablet by Bahá'u'lláh, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). On the importance of poetry in the history of the Faith and in its Writings, and absolute detachment as a prerequisite for attainment unto the Divine Presence. Includes translation of a Tablet by Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    6. Andalusí Theosophy: A Recontextualization, by Vahid Brown, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). The role of interconfessionalism in the emergence of Islamic and Jewish theosophical movements in 10th- to 13th-century Spain.  [about]
    7. Arc of Ascent: The Purpose of Physical Reality II, by John S. Hatcher: Review, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:2 (1994). [about]
    8. Ascent of Mount Carmel, The: Celebrating the Bicentenary of the Birth of the Báb, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). "From the Editor's Desk": Symbolism of the terraces on the shrine of the Bab; St. John's poem "Ascent of Mount Carmel"; overview of the articles in this issue of the Journal. [about]
    9. Báb's Epistle on the Spiritual Journey towards God, The, by Todd Lawson, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). A preliminary translation and discussion of the Bab's Risála fi's-Sulúk, one of his earliest extant compositions. It provides a brief discussion of the mystic quest, and sheds light on the Báb's relationship to the Shaykhi movement and to Sayyid Kázim. [about]
    10. Bahá'í Faith and the Perennial Mystical Quest, The: A Western Perspective, by Julio Savi, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 14 (2007). Mysticism is an intrinsic aspect of the Bahá'í Faith and mystical experience as formulated by William Ralph Inge and as expounded in the Bahá'í writings, emphasizing its practical and logical aspects; criticisms of mysticism; a Bahá'í mystical path. [about]
    11. Baha'i Faith and the Western Esoteric Tradition, The, by Lil Osborn (2015). The importance of individuals seeped in the mystical, the occult, and esoteric to the early 20th-century creation of Bahá'í perspectives on modernity and mysticism. [about]
    12. The Baha'is as a Mystic Community, by Moojan Momen: Response, by Jack McLean, in World Order, 38:1 (2006). The meanings of mysticism in the writings of Bahá'u'lláh and Shoghi Effendi. [about]
    13. Bahá'u'lláh and the Naqshbandi Sufis in Iraq, 1854-1856, by Juan Cole, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, Volume 2 (1984). The interplay of Bábí themes of messianism and the Sufi mystical emphasis on internal spirituality; analysis of an early poem by Bahá'u'lláh which hints that by the 1850s he began to see his mission of reform to carry out in the Bábí community. [about]
    14. Bahá'u'lláh's "Ode of the Dove": A Provisional Translation, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). A lengthy dialogue between Bahá'u'lláh (as persona/narrator) and the Huriyyih — the Maid of Heaven (a personification of “the Most Great Spirit”). [about]
    15. Baha'u'llah's Notes to His "Ode of the Dove", by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
    16. Bahá'u'lláh's Persian Poems Written before 1863, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Overview of the mystical early writings of Bahá'u'lláh, 1852-1863. Includes extensive bibliography, and a brief summary of each of the major works from this period. [about]
    17. Baha'u'llah's Seclusion in Kurdistan, by Bijan Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 1:1 (1993). Reconstruction of parts of this mostly undocumented period in Bahá'u'lláh's life. [about]
    18. Bahá'u'lláh's Symbolic Use of the Veiled Ḥúríyyih, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Analyzing some of the meanings behind the appearance of the Veiled Maiden, as alluded to by Bahá'u'lláh in His letters. [about]
    19. Clouds and the Hiding God: Observations on some Terms in the Early Writing of Bahá'u'lláh, by Moshe Sharon, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Metaphorical usage of clouds and rain in the mystical Tablets Rashh-i-Amá, Lawh Kullu't-Ta'ám, and Qasídiyyih-Varqá'iyyih. [about]
    20. Comparison of Islamic Religious Modes with the Four Valleys of Bahá'u'lláh, by Dianne Bradford (1998). Comparison of stages in The Four Valleys with three approaches from Islam: Theologians, Muslim Philosophers, and Mystics. [about]
    21. Correlating Mystical Experience to the Knowledge of God, by Jack McLean (2000). Mysticism, "the experience of God," and theology, "the knowledge of God," are both expressions of one symbiosis. This paper characterizes mysticism, debunks objections to it, and explores a Bahá'í context through the Four and Seven Valleys. [about]
    22. Dawn over Mount Hira and Other Essays, by Marzieh Gail (1976). A collection of essays on various topics of interest to Bahá'í studies and history. Most of these were first published in Star of the West and World Order between 1929 and 1971. [about]
    23. Desert Enlightenment: Prophets and Prophecy in American Science Fiction, by Justice Hagan (2013). On the pivotal role in the development of the central characters the narratives of the novel Dune, the comics The Rise of Apocalypse, and the film Star Wars. Contains a few passing mentions related to the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    24. Essential Mysticism, The, by Stanwood Cobb (1918). Clarification of some of the spiritual problems of humanity; the real value of Oriental mysticism; the mystery of the soul of man in terms not of psychology but of daily life; the value of spirituality in daily life. [about]
    25. Firm Cord of Servitude, The, by Theo A. Cope, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). A call for a revisioning of mysticism's claims of "union with God" in light of the Bahá'í Teachings as well as Jungian psychology. [about]
    26. He who knoweth his self hath known his Lord: Commentary, by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). Translation by Shoghi Effendi, completed by Cole. Themes include Islamic mysticism and the meaning of detachment, the meaning of the hadith about knowing one's self, the meaning of Return, and the hadith "The believer is alive in both worlds." [about]
    27. Hidden Words: Allusion to Progressive Revelation in Persian HW #77, by Daryl Lowery (1999). Student paper, exploring one of the longest and more mystical Hidden Words. [about]
    28. How to get out of it: Faná' and baqá' in the Early Writings of Baha'u'llah, by Alison Marshall (1999). Annihilation and the self in the Hidden Words and the Seven Valleys and the Four Valleys. [about]
    29. Hymn to Love (Sáqí, bi-dih ábí), A, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A ghazal, a mystical song of love about The Beloved, meaning God or a Manifestation. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
    30. Individualism and the Spiritual Path in Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa'i, by Juan Cole, in Occasional Papers in Shaykhi, Babi and Bahá'í Studies, 4 (1997). On Shaykh Ahmad al-Ahsa'i's criticisms of aspects of Sufism, and whether he could be considered a "mystic" despite his anathemas against Sufism. [about]
    31. Inebriation of His Enrapturing Call (mast-and bulbulán), The, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). Translation of the early mystical Tablet "Nightingales Are Inebriated" and an analysis of its themes of ecstasy, Mount Sinai, eschatology, dhikr, sama, and fana`. [about]
    32. Ineffability in Scripture: A Conversation with 6 Medieval Mystics, by Ismael Velasco (2006). On how the experience of six 13th- and 14th-century Christian mystics was shaped by their language, environment, and background; how that process illuminates Baha’i scripture; implications for the conduct and direction of Baha’i scholarship. [about]
    33. Influence of Bábí Teachings on Ling Ming Tang and Nineteenth-century China, The, by Jianping Wang, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). A possible historical linkage between the followers of Bábí and Bahá'i Movements in Iran and the believers of a Qadiriyya Order (the Ling Ming Tang) in China. [about]
    34. Islam, the Baha'i Faith and the Eternal Covenant of Alast, by Susan Maneck (2009). [about]
    35. Knowledge of God, The: An Essay on Bahá'í Epistemology, by Jack McLean, in World Order (1978). Knowledge of the divine is the beginning of all things. This can come through the investigative faculty, the path of reason, or through intuition and mysticism, the path of the heart. [about]
    36. Knowledge, Certitude and the Mystical Heart: The Hidden Essence of God's Word, by LeRoy Jones, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). Bahá'u'lláh equates Truth with divine knowledge and requires that we must first be cleansed of worldly things if we are to attain divine knowledge and true understanding. The elusive and transcendent nature of divine knowledge. [about]
    37. List of Articles on BahaiTeachings.org, by Christopher Buck (2014). List of online essays and articles by Christopher Buck. [about]
    38. Lover's Way, The: A Critical Comparison of the Nazm al-Sulúk by Ibn al-Fárid with the Qasídih-yi Varqá'iyyih by Bahá'ulláh, by Brian A. Miller (2000). Link to document offsite. [about]
    39. Mathnaviyí-i Mubárak, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    40. Mystic Cup, The: Essential Mystical Nature of the Bahá'í Faith, by LeRoy Jones, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). Although the Bahá’í Faith is fundamentally mystic in character, American Bahá’ís often do not even understand what  mysticism is. Heart-centered mystic oneness is crucial in individual, societal, and adminstrative spiritual transformation. [about]
    41. Mystic Journey of the Soul, The, by Gul Afroz Zaman, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). On the journey a soul must make to attain union with the Eternal from the confines of material life on earth; Christian and Sufi esoteric traditions vs. Bahá'í mysticism; the central theme of attaining a "Heavenly Homeland" and closeness with the Creator. [about]
    42. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Bahá'u'lláh in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
    43. Mystical Aspects of the Baha'i Faith as presented in the Seven Valleys, by LeRoy Jones (1998). Mystical aspects of the Bahá'í Faith are of paramount importance and may sometimes get overlooked in favor of its social aspects. [about]
    44. Mystical content and symbology of Bahá'u'lláh's Four Valleys, by David Langness, in Seeker's Path (1997). Symbology of the Four Valleys, and a brief overview of a four-stage spiritual growth model. [about]
    45. Mystical Dimensions of Islam, by Annemarie Schimmel (1975). Detailed history of Sufism and its thought, Islamic theosophy, and Persian and Turkish mystical poetry. Book includes no mention of the Bahá'í Faith, but is quite relevant. [about]
    46. Mystical Dimensions of the Bahá'í Administrative Order, The, by Kavian Sadeghzade Milani, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). The Bahá'i Administrative Order can be seen as a mystical entity, and there are some parallels between it and Sufism. For Bahá'is the encounter with the Administrative Order is critical to the mystical path. [about]
    47. Mysticism and the Bahá'í Community, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). The five characteristic features common to mystical orders in Buddhism, Christianity or Islam. Bahá'u'lláh's attitude to these characteristic features. Bahá'u'lláh turns the whole of the Bahá'í community into a mystical fellowship. [about]
    48. Mysticism and the Bahá'í Faith, by Farnaz Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 6:3 (1995). An examination of the Bahá'í Faith's relation to mysticism and mystic themes and ideas present in the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    49. Mysticism East and West, by Fargang Jahanpour, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 8 (2007). The meaning and nature of mysticism and some of the leading ideas in Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, Christian, and Bahá'í mysticism, exploring some of their similarities and differences. [about]
    50. Mysticism in African Traditional Religion and in the Bahá'í Faith: Classification of Concepts and Practices, by Enoch Tanyi, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). Both African Traditional Religion and the Bahá'í Faith originate from God, but at different times in the evolution of humankind. Owing to this common origin, the two have much in common. Both are essentially mystic in nature. [about]
    51. Mysticism, Science and Revelation, by Glenn A. Shook (1953). The essence of true religion is that feeling which unites man with God. Some mystics believes that man may become one with the Absolute, but this is not scientific. Differences between mystical experience and prophetic religion. [about]
    52. "Newly born babe of that Day", The: Mysticism in the Age of the Maturity of Humankind, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). The dynamic historical processes impacting mysticism. As the Bahá'í Revelation is the revelation of the maturity of humankind, it is free from certain flaws that in the past implied an early development of certain spiritually unacceptable behaviors. [about]
    53. Ode of the Dove, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). Translation of Qasídiy-i- Varqá'íyyih. [about]
    54. Poetry as Revelation: Introduction to Bahá'u'lláh's 'Mathnavíy-i Mubárak', by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). On Bahá'u'lláh and the poetic tradition, Sufism, Sufi poetry, and Rumi; rhetorical orientation; date of the poem and history of the text; and interpretation and the translation process. Includes a provisional translation. [about]
    55. Prayers and rituals in the Bahá'í Faith: Introduction to A Tablet to Jináb-i-Mullá 'Alí-Akbar fí Ardi'l-Álif, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 9 (2008). A tablet of Bahá'u'lláh to one of the Bábís to renew his faith before He had revealed his mission; its recipient and circumstances of composition; a prayer of 'reunion' and its attendant rituals. [about]
    56. Psychology of Mysticism and its Relationship to the Bahá'í Faith, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 2:4 (1984). Contrast of theories of mysticism and its physiological components from the perspective of 20th-century psychology. [about]
    57. Seven Cities in the Spiritual Journey to God: Gems of Divine Mystersies (Javáhiru'l-Asrár) and Seven Valleys, by Asadu'llah Fadil Mazandarani, in Star of the West, 13:11 (1923). Address given to an American audience in 1923, probably translated by Mirza Ahmad Sohrab, who accompanied Fadl's second tour of the USA and Canada. [about]
    58. Seven Cities of Bahá'u'lláh, The (2002). This is a compilation of only those passages from Bahá'u'lláh’s Gems of Divine Mysteries that relate to the journey through "Seven Cities," which has similarities to Bahá'u'lláh’s Seven Valleys. [about]
    59. Seven Valleys and Four Valleys: Interlinear Translation Comparison, by Bahá'u'lláh (2019). New 2019 translation, side-by-side with the 1945 translation and the Persian original. [about]
    60. Seven Valleys of Bahá'u'lláh and Farid ud-Din Attar, by Sheila Banani, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An overview of the similarities between the Seven Valleys by Bahá'u'lláh and the Conference of the Birds by the Persian Sufi Farid ud-din Attar. [about]
    61. Short Poem by "Darvísh" Muhammad, Bahá'u'lláh: Sáqí az ghayb-i baqá burqa' bar afkan az 'idhár, A: An Introduction and Three Versions of Provisional English Translations, by Frank Lewis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). Three alternative renderings of a translation of one of Baha’u’llah’s early poems, writing during his sojourn in Kurdistan; comments on his poetic work. [about]
    62. Some Themes and Images in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Bahá'í World, Volume 16 (1973-1976) (1976). Exploring the relationship between the Creative Word, particularly its expression in language, and the journey of the human soul to its Creator. [about]
    63. Tablet to Ismael on Annihilation in God, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2002). Short mention of faná', the mystical annihilation of the self, "which is none other than being a total sacrifice in His Lordship." [about]
    64. Tablet to Mirza Abu'l-Fadl Concerning the Questions of Manakji Limji Hataria: Baha'u'llah on Hinduism and Zoroastrianism, by Bahá'u'lláh (1995). Introduction to, article about, and translation of the Tablet to Maneckji. [about]
    65. Tafsir and the Meaning of the Qur'an: The Crucifixion in Muslim Thought, by Todd Lawson (2010). Using Qur'án 4:156-7 as an example, classical tafsīr, “scholastic" exegesis, has not always taken account of the way all Muslims understand the Quranic text. Other understandings may be found in poetry, philosophy, mysticism and even historical writing. [about]
    66. Towards the Summit of Reality: Table of Contents and Bibliography, by Julio Savi (2003). Front- and back-matter only of Savi's book Towards the Summit of Reality: An Introduction to the Study of Bahá'u'lláh's Seven Valleys and Four Valleys, which provides a snapshot of scholarship into these Writings of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    67. Translation list (2009). Index to talks, letters, and other items translated from Persian and Arabic to English by Adib Masumian; listed here for the sake of search engines and tagging. [about]
    68. "What I Want to Say is Wordless": Mystical Language, Revelation and Scholarship, by Ismael Velasco, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). If the Word of God transcends words and letters, what point is there to Scripture, let alone to scholarship; the paradox of a history of writers penning volumes on a subject which they assert cannot be grasped by language; the relevance of mysticism. [about]
    69. What is Baha'u'llah's Message to the Sufis?, by Roberta Law (1998). Nature of Sufism and Bahá'u'lláh's teachings for the Sufi community, especially as contained in the Seven Valleys. [about]
    70. Will, Knowledge, and Love as Explained in Baha'u'llah's Four Valleys, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:1 (1994). Exploration of some of the "seemingly abstruse" concepts of the Four Valleys. [about]
    71. "Wonderful True Visions": Magic, Mysticism, and Millennialism in the Making of the American Bahá'í Community, 1892-1895, by Richard Hollinger, in Search for Values: Ethics in Bahá'í Thought (2004). The early growth of the American, and especially the Chicago, communities was more gradual and eclectic than previously thought, and Kheiralla's influence was less crucial. [about]
     
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