Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.

Search for tag "Youth"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1869 (In the year) The 17-year-old Áqá Buzurg-i-Níshápúrí, Badí`, arrived in `Akká having walked from Mosul. He was able to enter the city unsuspected. [BKG297; RB3:178]
  • He was still wearing the simple clothes of a water bearer. [BKG297]
  • For the story of his life, see BKG294–297 and RB3:176–179.
  • For his transformation see RB3:179–182. Badí` saw `Abdu'l-Bahá in a mosque and was able to write a note to Him. The same night Badí` entered the citadel and went into the presence of Bahá'u'lláh. He met Bahá'u'lláh twice. [BKG297; RW3:179]
    • Badí` asked Bahá'u'lláh for the honour of delivering the Tablet to the Sháh and Bahá'u'lláh bestowed it on him. [BKG297; RB3:182]
    • The journey to Tehran took four months; he traveled alone. [BKG298]
    • For the story of the journey see BKG297–300 and RB3:184.
    • For the Tablet of Bahá'u'lláh to Badí` see BKG299 and RB3:175–176.
    • Regarding the tablet to the Sháh

      “Bahá’u’lláh’s lengthiest epistle to any single sovereign” -- Lawḥ-i-Sulṭán, (the Tablet to Náṣiri’d-Dín Sháh) Of the various writings that make up the Súriy-i-Haykal, one requires particular mention. The Lawḥ-i-Sulṭán, the Tablet to Náṣiri’d-Dín Sháh, Bahá’u’lláh’s lengthiest epistle to any single sovereign, was revealed in the weeks immediately preceding His final banishment to ‘Akká. It was eventually delivered to the monarch by Badí‘, a youth of seventeen, who had entreated Bahá’u’lláh for the honour of rendering some service. His efforts won him the crown of martyrdom and immortalized his name. The Tablet contains the celebrated passage describing the circumstances in which the divine call was communicated to Bahá’u’lláh and the effect it produced. Here, too, we find His unequivocal offer to meet with the Muslim clergy, in the presence of the Sháh, and to provide whatever proofs of the new Revelation they might consider to be definitive, a test of spiritual integrity significantly failed by those who claimed to be the authoritative trustees of the message of the Qur’án. [The Universal House of Justice (Introduction to ‘The Summons of the Lord of Hosts’)]

    • See Three Momentous Years in The Bahá'í World for the story of Badí.
  • Akka; Mosul; Iraq; Tihran; Iran Badi (Mirza Aqa Buzurg-i-Nishapuri); Lawh-i-Sultan (Tablet to Nasirid-Din Shah); Suriy-i-Haykal (Surih of the Temple); Tablets to kings and rulers; Nasirid-Din Shah; Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Deaths; Persecution; Apostles of Bahaullah; Youth
    1919. 18 Nov The periodical entitled "The Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom" was published and distributed by Miss Ella Roberts from 1919 to 1924. [Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America: Native American creation stories, edited by Rosemary Skinner Keller, Rosemary Radford Ruether, Marie Cantlon p.782-783]
  • The story of the naming of the magazine...
      Margaret Randall told of the establishment of a Bahá'í Junior Magazine and asked 'Abdu'l-Bahá for a name for it. The Master was told who had charge of it, and His face lighted up with a beautiful smile as He said: "The name is The Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom. Who writes it? This (name) is suitable for it. [WHR128-129]
  • See A Compilation on Bahá’í Education #96 for a tablet by 'Abdu'l-Bahá to the children of the Bahá’í school, Urbana, Illinois found here.
  • See A Compilation on Bahá’í Education #102 for a tribute to the magazine by Shoghi Effendi found here. He called it "first and only organ of the Bahá’í youth throughout the world".
  • At the American National Convention in 1925 (July 4 - 9) it was reported that "The Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom", edited by Ella Roberts and "Bahá’í World Fellowship" edited by Mrs. Victoria Bedikian had merged. ["Bahá’í News Letter" #6 Jul-Aug 1925 p.6]
  • Haifa; United States Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom; Children; Youth; - Periodicals; Publications; First publications
    1968 22 – 23 Jun The first National Youth Conference of the Bahá’ís of the United States opened in Wilmette, Illinois. [BW15:327 8]
  • For picture see BW15:325.
  • Wilmette; Illinois; United States Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, National
    1968 27 – 28 Jul The first National Youth Conference of Honduras opened in Santa Rosa de Copán. [BW15:328–9] Santa Rosa de Copan; Honduras Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1968 9 Oct The Universal House of Justice addressed its second letter to Bahá’í Youth. [BW15:324; WG152–4] Haifa Universal House of Justice; Youth
    1969 3 – 6 Apr The first European Youth Conference opened in Madrid, Spain. [BW15:329] Madrid; Spain; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International
    1969 4 – 6 Apr The first National Youth Conference of Australia opened at Bolton Place summer School. [BW15:329]
  • For picture see BW15:328.
  • Bolton Place; Australia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, National; Conferences, First
    1969 24 – 25 May The first Bahá’í Youth Conference of Japan opened on Jogashima Island. [BW15:329] Jogashima Island; Japan Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, National; Conferences, First
    1969 29 Dec - 1970 2 Jan The First Pacific Area Bahá’í Youth Conference took place in Apia, Western Samoa. [BW15:329–30]
  • For picture see BW15:330.
  • Apia; Samoa; Oceania Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First; Youth
    1970 (In the Year) A Bahá’í International Youth Conference was held in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. Abidjan; Ivory Coast Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1970 (In the Year) Botswana held its first National Youth School. [BW15:329] Botswana Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, National; Conferences, First
    1970 19 – 21 Jun Rúhíyyih Khánum interrupted her African teaching safari to meet with more than 2,000 youth at the National Youth Conference in the United States. [BW15:331; VV10] United States; Africa Amatul-Baha Ruhiyyih Khanum; Amatul-Baha Ruhiyyih Khanum, Journeys of; Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1970 25 Dec - 1971 3 Jan The First International Bahá’í Youth Winter School took place in Salzburg, Austria, attended by 600 people from 25 countries. [BW15:332]
  • For picture see BW15:332.
  • Salzburg; Austria; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1971 Apr The International Bahá’í Youth Conference took places at Oteppe-Namur, Belgium, launching a two-year youth campaign for Europe. [BW15:333–4]
  • For picture see BW15:334.
  • Oteppe-Namur; Belgium; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1971 31 Jul - 11 Aug The European Youth Conference took place in Fiesch, Switzerland, attended by 1,200 youth from 50 countries. [BW15:336–8]
  • About 200 people enrolled in the Bahá’í Faith during the conference. [BW15:336]
  • For pictures see BW15:337.
  • Fiesch; Switzerland; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1971 27 – 30 Aug The first Bahá’í Youth Conference for Western Asia took place in New Delhi. [BW15:335]
  • Two thousand people enrolled during the conference and the week following. [BW15:335]
  • New Delhi; India; Asia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences; Mass conversion
    1971 Nov The first Bahá’í Youth Conference of the Antilles took place in the Dominican Republic. [BW 15:217] Dominican Republic Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1972 summer Over 150 American youth join European youth in Operation Hand-in-Hand, a joint teaching project. [BW15:338]
  • For picture see BW15:347.
  • United States Teaching campaigns; Youth
    1972 Dec The first International Youth Conference of Surinam took places in Paramaribo. [BW15:341] Paramaribo; Suriname; Latin America Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1972 29 - 31 Dec The first West African Bahá’í Youth conference was held in The Gambia.

    The Continental Board of Counsellors sponsored the first West African Bahá’í Youth Conference in conjunction with the National Spiritual Assembly of Upper West Africa. The Conference was held in The Gambia on the campus of Yundum College some fifteen miles from the capital city of Bathurst. Youth representing nine countries in this zone attended: Nigeria, Upper Volta, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Sierra Leone, The Gambia, Senegal and Mauritania, plus pioneers originating from the United States, Mauritius, Malaysia, Iran, and friiq. A young Bahá’í from Sweden was able to greet the friends during a brief stop on a boat cruise. Counsellors Mr. H. R. Ardikani and Dr. William Maxwell Jr., were present as well as six of their Auxiliary Board members, Mr. Amos Agwu, Mr. Muhammad Al-Salihi, Mrs. H. Vera Edwards, Mr. Friday Ekpe, Mr. Shidan Kouchekzadeh and Dr. B. Sadiqzadeh. A total of fifty-six persons attended. [Bahá'í News 504]

    Banjul (Bathurst); Gambia, The; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1973 (In the year) The first International Youth Conference of Mexico took place in Puebla City, was attended by 200 youth from five countries. [BW15:343] Puebla; Mexico Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences; North America
    1973 Ridván The Nine Year Plan was successfully completed. [BW16:131]
  • For the growth of the Bahá’í Faith in this period see BW16:130.
  • Also see The Nine Year Plan, 1964-1973: Statistical Report, Ridván 1973 by the Universal House of Justice.
  • See as well the document entitled Analysis of the Nine Year International Teaching Plan of the Bahá'í Faith published by the Universal House of Justice in April, 1964.
  • "Tribute must be paid to the host of Bahá'í youth from many countries whose travels in Africa hastened and ensured the success of the Nine Year Plan in that continent, and in particular to the international "rescue squad" of youth from Persia, India, the Philippines, Malaysia and other countries who in the closing hours of the Plan sealed its triumphant conclusion in Africa." [BW15p184]
  • "The friends in several countries of Africa are also indebted to the outstanding services of Dr. 'Aziz Navidi, an international lawyer and Baha'i International Community Representative for Africa, who assisted the Bahá'í communities in these countries in obtaining official recognition and performed other valuable services." [BW15p185-186]
  • BWC Nine Year Plan (1964-1973); Teaching Plans; Youth; Travel teaching; Aziz Navidi
    1973 Nov The first youth conference of Papua New Guinea took place in Sogeri with 40 youth and visitors. [BW16:276] Sogeri; Papua New Guinea Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1974 (In the year) The first International Bahá’í Youth Conference to be held in Botswana took place in Mahalapye. [BW16:150] Mahalapye; Botswana Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1974 May c. The first National Youth Conference of Burma took place during the visit of Hand of the Cause Amatu’l-Bahá Rúhíyyih Khánum. [BW16:251] Myanmar (Burma) Amatul-Baha Ruhiyyih Khanum; Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1974 4 – 8 Aug The first International Youth Conference, the largest conference ever held in Hawaii to date, took place in Hilo. [BW16:229]<
  • For picture see BW16:232.
  • Hilo; Hawaii Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1975 29 Mar The first Bahá’í Youth Conference of the Canary Islands was held in Santa Cruz. [BW16:313] Santa Cruz; Canary Islands Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1975 9 – 12 Jul The first International Bahá’í Youth Conference of Iceland took place in Njardvik with youth from nine countries. [BW16:301] Njardvik; Iceland; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1975 Dec The first International Youth School to be held in Rhodesia took place near Bulawayo. [BW16:155] Bulawayo; Rhodesia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, First
    1976 24 – 25 Mar The first Continental Youth Conference of Western Asia took place in Karachi, Pakistan. [BW16:265] Karachi; Pakistan; Asia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1976 9 – 11 Jul An International Youth Conference was held in Ivory Coast, attended by nearly 200 Bahá’ís. [BW17:150, 153] Ivory Coast; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, International; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1977 12 – 14 Aug An International Bahá’í Youth Conference was held in Enugu, Nigeria, attended by over 250 Bahá’ís from 19 countries. [BW17:150, 153] Enugu; Nigeria; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1978 Aug An International Bahá’í Youth Conference was held in Yaoundé, Cameroon, attended by some 380 Bahá’ís from 19 countries. [BW17:150, 153] Yaounde; Cameroon; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1982 27 Jun The Bahá’í Youth Academy was established in Panchgani, India. [BW18:230–2] Panchgani; Maharashtra; India Bahai Youth Academy; Bahai Academy; Youth; Bahai study centers
    1982 23 Oct Authorities arrested 45 Bahá'ís in Shiraz on the order of the prosecutor. On October 30th another 40 Baha’is were arrested. In all cases, they were arrested simply because of their religious beliefs. Some were later released but many of those arrested were subjected to interrogation and excruciating torture. The interrogations and torture were carried out to extract information about Bahá'í organizations and to force prisoners to renounce their faith and convert to Islam.
  • The Revolutionary Court of Shiraz sent 22 of those arrested to the gallows. The executions began on January 1, 1983, with the killing of Hedayatollah Siavoshi.
  • The last of the group to die was Soheil Houshmand on June 28, 1983.
  • The oldest among the executed Bahá'ís was Abdolhossein Azadi, 66, and the youngest was Mona Mahmoudinejad, a high school student of 17.
  • The entire Eshraghi family — father, mother and daughter — were executed. Also executed were a mother and son, Nosrat and Bahram Yaldaie, and a young couple, Jamshid and Tahereh Siavoshi. Yadollah, the father of 17-year-old Mona Mahmoudinejad, was also killed.
  • Ahmad Sabet Sarvestani was the only one among them who died in prison as a result of torture before he could be hanged. [Iran Press Watch 19466]
  • Shiraz; Iran Persecution, Arrests; Persecution; Deaths; Persecution, Iran; Persecution; Mona Mahmudnizhad; Youth
    1983 Mar The first International Youth Camp of Surinam was held in NW. Nickerie, attended by 130 Bahá’ís. [BW18:176] Nickerie; Suriname International Youth Camps
    1983 18 Jun In Shiraz, ten Bahá'í women ranging in age from 17 to 57, were hanged. All of the women had been tortured and interrogated in the months prior to their execution. The youngest of these martyrs was Mona Mahmudnizhad, a 17-year-old schoolgirl who had been beaten on the soles of her feet, kissed the hands of her executioner and placed the hangman's rope around her own throat. The names of the others executed were Zarrin Muqimi-Abyanih, 28, Ruya Ishraqi, a 23-year-old veterinary student, Shahin Dalvand, 25, a sociologist; Izzat Janami Ishraqi, 57, a homemaker; Mahshid Nirumand, 28, who had qualified for a degree in physics but had it denied her because she was a Bahá'í, Simin Sabiri, 25; Tahirih Arjumandi Siyavushi, 30, a nurse; Akhtar Thabit, 25, also a nurse; Nusrat Ghufrani Yalda'i, 47, a mother and member of the local Bahá'í Spiritual Assembly. [Hanged for teaching “Sunday school”]
  • For the story of the martyrs see BW19:180–7 and VV56.
  • For their obituaries see BW19:596–607.
  • For pictures of the martyred women see BW19:240–1.
  • See World Order magazine Vol 4 Issue 3, 1986 for an article on Zarrin Muqimi-Abyanih written by her sister Simin Khavari.
  • See Bahá'í Teachings for the story of Nusrat Yalda’i, a mother of four children, three sons and one daughter, who was executed for her hospitality.
  • See Track Persia dated 25 January 2020 for an account of how female prisoners have been treated in Iranian prisons since the Islamic Revolution.
  • In 1985 a 45-page booklet entitled The Story of Mona: 1965-1983 was published by Bahá'î Canada Publications, under the auspices of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Canada.
  • Also in 1985 a music video called Mona and Children was made by Douglas John Cameron and friends.
  • In 2003 a play, A New Dress for Mona by Mark Perry was produced by the Drama Circle.
  • Lenz entertainment produced a screenplay entitled Mona's Dream. It was written by Houshang Touzie and Jack Lenz and won the 2010 Female Eye Audience Choice Screenplay Award. Facebook.
  • In June of 2017 the book, Our Friend Mona: The Remarkable Life of a Young Martyr by Azadeh Rohanian Perry and Mark E Perry (with the assistance of Mona's mother, Mrs. Farkhundih Mahmudnizhad) was published by Circle of Spirit.
  • Shiraz; Iran Martyrs, Shiraz 1983; Mona Mahmudnizhad; Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Deaths; Persecution; Youth; persecution, Persecution, Education; Shahin Dalvand; Izzat Janami Ishraqi; Mahshid Nirumand; Simin Sabiri; Tahirih Arjumandi Siyavushi; Akhtar Thabit; Nusrat Ghufrani Yaldai; Zarrin Muqimi-Abyanih; Ruya Ishraqi
    1983 24 Jun In response to the hanging of 10 Bahá’í women in Shíráz, the Universal House of Justice addressed a cable to the Bahá’í youth throughout the world, urging them to re-dedicate themselves to the Cause. [BW19:187–8, 297] BWC Youth
    1983. (early) Jul The European European Board of Counsellors sponsored a Bahá'í Youth Conference in Innsbruck. Amatu’l-Bahá Rúḥíyyih Khánum was a special guest. It was attended by about 1,500 from some 40 countries. [BW19p173]
  • See the letter from the Universal House of Justice addressed to the Conference.
  • Insbruck; Austria Conference; Youth Conference
    1984 3 Jan The Universal House of Justice addressed a letter to the Bahá’í youth of the world encouraging them to volunteer a period of service to the Bahá’í Faith. [AWH14–17; BW19:297–8, 299, 311–13; VV116] Haifa Universal House of Justice; Youth, Year of service; Youth
    1984 28 – 30 Dec The first National Bahá’í Youth Conference to be held in Greece took place in Athens. [BW19:319] Athens; Greece Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1985 (In the year) To support the United Nations International Youth Year Bahá’í communities undertook a variety of activities. [BW19:301–10] Worldwide United Nations; International Youth Year
    1985 5 – 8 Apr An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Bophuthatswana, attended by 198 people. [BW19:300] Bophuthatswana; South Africa; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 3 – 7 Jul An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Columbus, Ohio, United States attended by more than 3,200 youth from 42 nations. [BW19:300] Columbus OH; Ohio; United States; North America Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 6 – 9 Jul The European Bahá’í Youth Conference was held in Antwerp, Belgium, in July 1985, and was attended by some 1,450 youth from 45 nations. The youth addressed the European Parliament and the Council of Europe in letters which told of their resolve to put into action the International Youth Year themes of ‘Participation, Development and Peace’. The youth spoke of programs in which Bahá’ís were supporting the themes, including human rights education and social and economic development projects. [BW19:301]
  • For picture see BW19:315.
  • Antwerp; Belgium; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year; European Union
    1985 Aug An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Molepolole, Botswana, attended by 119 youth from six countries. [BW19:300]
  • For picture see BW19:320.
  • Molepolole; Botswana; Africa Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 Aug An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in New Delhi, India, attended by more than 550 youth from 24 countries. [BW19:300] New Delhi; India; Asia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 1 – 4 Aug An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Port Dickson, Malaysia, attended by 1,300 youth from 15 countries, the largest gathering of Bahá’ís ever held in Malaysia. [BW19:301] Port Dickson; Malaysia; Asia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 2 – 5 Aug An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Lima, Peru, attended by 500 youth from 18 countries and representing four native tribes. [BW19:300]<
  • For picture see BW19:322.
  • Lima; Peru; Latin America Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, International; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 8 – 11 Aug An International Youth Conference to support the United Nations International Youth Year was held in Kauai, Hawaii, attended by 300 youth from nine Pacific countries. [BW19:301]
  • For picture see BW19:321.
  • Kauai; Hawaii; Oceania Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Conferences, International; Youth; International Youth Year
    1985 Oct The first National Bahá’í Youth Conference in Nepal took place, attended by 120 Bahá’ís, the largest Bahá’í gathering ever held in the country. [VV74] Nepal Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1986 Apr The first province-wide gathering of Bahá’í youth in Northern Ireland convenes. [BINS154:15] Northern Ireland Youth
    1986 18 – 24 Jul The European Bahá’í Youth Movement is launched at the Bahá’í Youth School, Landegg Conference Centre, Switzerland. [BINS157:9–10; BINS158:10] Landegg; Switzerland; Europe Youth; Landegg Academy
    1987 16 – 17 Jan The first Youth Conference of the Bahamas was held with representation from three islands. [BINS173:9] Bahamas Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1988 3 – 7 Aug The first Iberian Youth Conference was held in Lisbon, attended by 120 Bahá’ís from nine European countries. [BINS181:6] Lisbon; Portugal; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth
    1988 24 Dec The first National Youth Conference of Côte d’Ivoire took place. [BINS196:9] Ivory Coast Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    1989 Jul - Aug Five European Regional ‘Peace Moves’ Youth Conferences were held in different parts of the continent. Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; Peace
    1989 4 – 6 Nov The European Bahá’í Youth Council, comprised of seven youth and appointed by the Universal House of Justice to coordinate those European youth activities that have a continental impact, met for the first time, in London. [BINS213:4; BW93–4:121] London; United Kingdom; Europe European Bahai Youth Council; Youth
    1989 18 Dec - 1990 2 Jan During the Youth Winter School in Traben-Trarback participants from 12 countries including East Germany, Romania, Hungary and the Soviet Union gathered for the first time since the Second World War. [BINS215:2] Traben-Trarback; Germany; Eastern Europe; Soviet Union; Russia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; Conferences, International; Winter schools; First conferences
    1990 (In the year) The first Adam Benke Project was organized by the Bahá'í European Youth Council in Bulgaria.
  • The first semi-public talks and lectures in Bulgaria were given in restaurants, where people are invited to private meetings.
  • Eleven people become Bahá'ís.
  • Bulgaria European Bahai Youth Council; Youth; Firsts, Other Find ref
    1990 Jul The first youth conference of Estonia was held in Kabli, near Parnu, attended by some 113 participants from all parts of Europe Kabli; Parnu; Estonia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1990 22 Nov – 6 Dec The First European Bahá'í Youth Encounter was held in the Canary Islands, attended by over 150 people from eight countries. [BINS239:1] Canary Islands; Europe Youth; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, International
    1991 15 – 21 Jul The first European Bahá'í Youth Conference of Romania was held in Neptune. [BINS253:9; VV74]
  • For picture see VV74.
  • Neptune; Romania; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International
    1992 Apr 20 The Six Year Plan was successfully completed. [BW20p115]
  • For the major accomplishments of the Plan see AWH97–102, 187–8 and VV126.
  • The Faith was represented in every country. 1.5 million enrolled during the Plan. [Ridván Message 1992]
  • With more that 5 million people enrolled, Bahá'ís lived in 217 independent countries, territories and islands representing 2,112 tribes, minorities and ethnic groups. [Ridván Message 1992] [VV126]
  • Literature was translated into 802 languages and tribal tongues. [Ridván Message 1992] [VV126]
  • The proclamation of the Faith entered a new phase from the proclamation of 1967 in commemoration of Bahá'u'lláh's proclamation to the kings to the opportunities offered by the Iránian revolution in 1979 to the distribution of The Promise of World Peace.
  • The dedication of the House of Worship in New Delhi.
  • The emergence of the Faith from obscurity.
  • The increase in the number of projects of social and economic development.
  • The involvement of youth in the service to the Faith. The concept of the "year of service" was initiated.
  • The advances in the consolidation of the Bahá'í administrative as marked by the improvement in internal development and the collaborative efforts of its two arms.
  • The inauguration of the great building projects on Mount Carmel.
  • Six Year Plan (1986-1992); Youth, Year of service; Teaching Plans
    1992 25 - 27 Sep The first Bahá'í Youth Conference of Lithuania took places in Kaunas, attended by 32 Bahá'ís. [BINS281:1] Kaunas; Lithuania Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1993 20 Feb The first National Youth Conference of Hungary was held in Debrecen, attended by 60 youth. [BINS289:3] Debrecen; Hungary Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1993 Aug The first International Bahá'í Youth Conference of Belarus was held, attended by 164 people from 16 countries. [BINS299:8; BINS306:7; BW93–4:123] Belarus; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth
    1994 May 22 The first Bahá'í Children and Youth Conference of Martinique was held in Fort-de-France, attended by 22 people. [BINS318:4–5] Fort-de-France; Martinique Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth
    1994 Jul 20 – 25 The European Bahá'í Youth Council sponsored five regional ‘Shaping Europe' conferences, in Berlin, Bucharest, St Petersburg, Barcelona and Wolverhampton, United Kingdom. [BINS323:3–5; BW94–5:177–8, 189] Berlin; Germany; Bucharest; Romania; St Petersburg; Russia; Barcelona; Portugal; Wolverhampton; United Kingdom; Europe Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth
    1994 Sep 9 – 11 The first National Youth Conference of Liberia was held, attended by 75 youth. [BW94–5:188–9]
  • For picture see BW94–5:189.
  • Liberia Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Youth; First conferences
    2006 19 May Iranian security officials arrested 54 Bahá'ís in the city of Shiraz who were involved in a community service project, many of them in their teens and early 20's. They were not charged and all but three were released within six days. It was the largest mass arrest of Bahá'ís since the 1980's. [New York Times 1 June, 2006] Shiraz; Iran Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Arrests; Persecution; Youth
    2013 Jul – Oct The holding of 114 Youth Conferences around the world at the request of the Universal House of Justice. The purpose of the gatherings were to explore such themes as the characteristics inherent to the period of youth, the historical contribution of young people to the transformation of society, the responsibilities of the present generation of youth, the society-building power of the Bahá'í Teachings, and the importance of faith and tenacity to a life of service. [List of places and dates for Youth Conferences]
  • See The Five Year Plan 2011-2016: Summary of Achievements and Learning pg46-43.
  • Worldwide Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Youth; Conferences, International; Youth; BWNS
    2016 10 Aug Armed officers, masked in balaclavas from Yemen’s National Security Bureau (NSB) intelligence agency, which worked hand in hand with the armed Houthi authorities, (also knowns as Ansar Allah) stormed a Bahá’í youth educational workshop in Sana’a. The event was part of a nine day, cross country moral and educational program for Bahá’í youth organized by the Bahá'í -run Nida Foundation for Development. Sixty-five people were arrested including 14 women and six people under 18 without an arrest warrant. Half were Bahá'ís and, at the time of this writing, it was believed some fourteen remained in prison, including young mothers. Further arrests were carried out later and within a week all but 10 of those who had been incarcerated had been released.
  • Among those detained are Nadim Tawfiq Al-Sakkaf, (British Council’s country manager in Yemen), his brother Nader Tawfiq Al-Sakkaf and Kaiwan Mohamed Ali Qadri. [UN Human Rights 4 Oct 2016, BWNS1118, publicaffairs.bahai.us, UN Human Rights, Defending Bahá'í Rights facebook page]
  • Sanaa; Yemen Persecution, Yemen; Persecution, Arrests; Persecution; Youth; BWNS
    2018. 25 Jan The announcement of the opening of an educational centre at the Bahá'í Lotus Temple. The educational facility, which can accommodate hundreds, will be used to host camps, courses, and seminars for youth and young adults who are involved in efforts to improve their communities. With the opening of the new educational facility, many more will be able to attend these programs than was previously possible.
  • Shaheen Javid, General Manager of the House of Worship reported that the Temple, which opened in 1986, received 10,000–15,000 visitors on weekdays and over 35,000 on weekends. [BWNS1234]
  • New Delhi; India Shaheen Javid; Mashriqul-Adhkar (House of Worship); Mashriqul-Adhkar, Delhi; Lotus temple; BWNS; Statistics; Youth
    2018 (post International Bahá'í Convention) Some 80 members of the Continental Boards of Counsellors met for a conference at the Bahá'í World Centre following the 12th International Bahá'í Convention. On that occasion, the Counsellors were able to reflect on major developments in Bahá'í communities around the world. In order to share their experiences some of their stories were recorded and made available via podcasts. The Counsellors discussed the impact of spiritual and moral education programs offered by the Bahá'í community on youth and the communities in which they live, drawing on experiences in Cambodia, Kiribati, India, Norway, Spain, and Timor Leste (or East Timor). [BWNS1264]
  • Counsellors in Africa, Alain Pierre Djoulde, Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, Maina Mkandawire, and Judicaël Mokolédiscuss discussed endeavours in the field of education in that continent. [BWNS1269]
  • The podcasts can be found here or on SoundCloud.
  • BWC; Haifa; Cambodia; Kiribati; India; Norway; Spain; Timor Leste (East Timor) Counsellors; Conferences, Counsellors; * Institute process; Youth; Podcasts; Education; Conventions, International; BWNS
    2018 21 Sep The Bahá'í World Centre announced the release of three short films that highlighted aspects of the community building endeavours of Bahá'ís and like-minded friends around the world. Totaling about 32 minutes, the new films covered three themes: nurturing younger generations, exploring the empowerment of junior youth, and communities learning to advance together. The films complement the recently produced documentary film A Widening Embrace released in April. [BWNS1286]

    The films can be downloaded using the link below:
    Nurturing younger generations
    Exploring the empowerment of junior youth
    Communities learning to advance together

    BWC Widening Embrace, A (film); * Institute process; Childrens classes; Youth empowerment program; Ruhi Institute; Films; Documentaries; Documentaries, BWC
    2022. 1 Jan The Universal House of Justice announced that the courses of the Ruhi Institute would continue to be a prominent feature of the educational endeavours of all training institutes during this new series of global Plans. The Ruhi Institute will, during the Nine Year Plan, complete the preparation of all the materials it has outlined for use in children’s classes, junior youth groups, and study circles, and the revision of published editions as necessary in light of experience. However, beyond what it has already delineated, it is not expected to develop new materials to be used worldwide. [Message 1 January 1922] BWC Nine Year Plan (2022-2031); * Institute process; Childrens classes; Youth empowerment program; Ruhi Institute

    from the chronology of Canada

    date event locations tags see also
    1927 (In the year) The formation of a Bahá'í Youth Group in Montreal, perhaps the first in the Western World. [OBCC78, 85]
  • Some of the members were: Mary Maxwell, George Spendlove, Rowland Estall, Emeric and Rosemary Sala, Teddy Edwards Alizade, Norman McGregor, Judie Russell Blakely, Dorothy and Glen Wade, Edward Dewing, Gerrard Sluter, David Hofman, Rena Gordon and Eddie Elliot.
  • The Bahá'í youth group was a social club organized by Ruhiyyih Khanum called the "Fratority Club." By this word, Ruhiyyih Khanum meant to put together the words "fraternity" and "sorority" and had invited to belong to it people, mostly young students at McGill, who would otherwise not have been able to find membership in the exclusive fraternities and sororities around the campus. [Black Roses in Canada's Mosaic: Four Decades of Black History by Will C. van den Hoonaard and Lynn Echevarria-Howe]
  • A Bahá’í youth group had been started in California in 1912, but the Montreal group was the first in North America to systematically study the teachings—an exercise that had a long—lasting influence on the development and growth of the Bahá’í community in Canada and elsewhere. Members of the group would later distinguish themselves as some of the best-known teachers, administrators, pioneers, and writers of the Bahá’í Faith. [BWM46]
  • Montreal, QC Youth Group; George Spendlove; Rowland Estall; Emeric Sala; Rosemary Sala; Teddy Edwards Alizade; Norman McGregor; Judie Blakely; Russell Blakely; Dorothy Wade; Glen Wade; Edward Dewing; Gerrard Sluter; David Hofman; Rena Gordon; Eddie Elliot
    1929. 25 Dec Willard and Doris McKay , then living in Geneva, NY, arrived in Montreal, the last stop on their first major teaching trip. They had visited Philadelphia, Washington, DC, Baltimore, Boston, Portsmouth, NH before arriving in Montreal by train.
  • They were guests of the Maxwells for a week and spoke seven times during their visit.
  • During their time there they were dinner guest of Ernest Harrison and his family. Years later Ernest, then separated from his wife, would be a pioneer to Prince Edward Island.
  • They met Mary's "Youth Group", the second formed in North America and the first to be dedicated to a deeper understanding of the Writings. Many were students at McGill where Mary was taking special classes and others were Eddie Elliot, an electrician who had been raised in the Maxwell house (son of the maid), Emeric Sala, Roland Estall, Rosemary Gillis (later Rosemary Sala).
  • During their time there they slept in the bed of 'Abdu'l-Bahá that May covered with "the Robe of Bounty". It was a gown that had belonged to the Greatest Holy Leaf and had been given to Lua Getsinger and Lua had given it to May. [FMH97-102]
  • Montreal, QC Willard McKay; Doris McKay; travel teaching; Robe of Bounty; Eddie Elliot; Emeric Sala; Roland Estall; Rosemary Sala; Youth Group
    1951. 22 Oct After two preliminary meetings, the Montreal District Youth Group got away to a good start. Under the direction of John Pollitt, of St. Lambert, this group reviewed Prescription for Living. There were plans to do something by way of social activity during the coming season and every effort was made to interest young people in Bahá'í activity. [CBN No 25 January 1952 p8] Montreal, QC Montreal District Youth Group; John Pollitt

    from the main catalogue

    1. Address to the Youth, by Ali Nakhjavani (n.d.). [about]
    2. Adult/Youth Study: Meetings, books, methods, and outcomes recommended in the Writings for youth and adult study, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2004). [about]
    3. Advancing in Bahá'í-inspired Education, by Sona Farid-Arbab, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:4 (2016). A number of diverse educators labor in diverse cultural and ecological settings to identify educational needs, develop elements of a coherent pedagogy, and create a series of teaching-learning experience, in light of Bahá'u'lláh's vision for humanity. [about]
    4. Advent of Divine Justice, by Shoghi Effendi (1971). A letter from the Gurdian to the Bahá’ís of North America, dated 25 December 1938; the Bahá'ís' achievements and responsibilities; the crises affecting the world; the destiny of America. [about]
    5. Bahá'í Faith in the Arabic Speaking Middle East, The: Part 1 (1753-1863), by Ramsey Zeine, in Lights of Irfan, Volume 7 (2006). Bábí and early Bahá'í links to the Arab world and the Arabic language; the identity of the Faith is a fusion of Persian and Arab origins. [about]
    6. Bahá'í Youth and Sexuality: A Personal/Professional View, by Sharon Kennedy and Andrew Kennedy, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:1 (1988). The role of Bahá’í youth with respect to prevailing attitudes towards sexuality found in Western society, emphasizing the process of spiritual growth and the principle of chastity; a number of practical suggestions are made. [about]
    7. Bahá'u'lláh's Symbolic Use of the Veiled Ḥúríyyih, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Analyzing some of the meanings behind the appearance of the Veiled Maiden, as alluded to by Bahá'u'lláh in His letters. [about]
    8. Challenge: Messages to Bahá'í Youth, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi (1975). Compilation of messages to Bahá'í youth in English and French. [about]
    9. Challenges for Bahá'í Youth in a Western Way of Life, by Universal House of Justice (2013). Difficulties young people might face in upholding Bahá'í ideals and standards of behaviour in the context of Western culture and sexual mores. [about]
    10. Children, by Nancy A. Davis, in The Bahá'í Encyclopedia (2009). On persons in the stages of life from conception, when the soul comes into being, to the age of fifteen, the beginning of spiritual maturity or adulthood. [about]
    11. Chosen Path, The: Tahirih of Persia and Her Search for God, by Hussein Ahdieh and Hillary Chapman (2020). Overview of the life of Tahirih of Qazvin and this period of Bábí history, written for a Bahá'í youth audience. PDF of the book, and an audio podcast about it. [about]
    12. Contes interactifs pour pré-jeunes, by Romuald Boubou Moyo (2018). Il s’agit d’une deuxième version du livret pour pré-jeunes "Marcher dans le droit chemin." Ils vont pouvoir apprécier, en tant qu’acteurs principaux, les implications morales qui découlent des choix qu'ils feront en lisant les vingt contes interactifs. [about]
    13. Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh for Bahá'í Holy Days, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Forty-five selections revealed for, or relating to, nine Bahá’í Holy Days. [about]
    14. Deepening and Compilation for Bahá'í Youth Teaching Projects, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2004). This deepening includes 10 sessions especially designed for youth on teaching projects. [about]
    15. Divine Education: The Root of Knowledge, by Abu'l-Qasim Faizi, in Glory: A Bahá'í Youth Magazine, 5:2 (1973). On Bahá'í families and raising children to appreciate Bahá'í principles. [about]
    16. Education of Youth and Our Twentieth Century Dilemma, The, by Habib Taherzadeh, in Bahá'í News, 342 (1959). Moral education is lacking in modern societies. Bahá'í moral precepts can guide us towards the goal of moral evolution, to usher in the Golden Age of human maturity and the dawn of Divine Civilization on this planet. [about]
    17. Erotic Imagery in the Allegorical Writings of Baha'u'llah, by John Walbridge (1997). Mystical symbolism in early Bahá'í poetry. [about]
    18. European Bahá'í Youth Conference in Innsbruck, by Universal House of Justice (1983). Challenges facing European Bahá'í Youth, followed by consolation to Bahá'í youth in light of the 1983 martyrdoms of young Bahá'ís in Iran. [about]
    19. Highlights from the Fourth Bahá'í National Youth Conference: The Time is Now! (1977). Excerpts from the University of Illinois Assembly Hall in June-July 1977 with 3000 Bahá'í youth from 15 countries. [about]
    20. Human Rights and the Rights of the Child: Implications for Children's Participation in the Bahá'í Community, by Greg Duly, in Bahá'í-Inspired Perspectives on Human Rights (2001). Are human rights universal? Do rights have spiritual or religious influences? What is the relevance of child rights and prospects of children’s participation in the Bahá’í community? [about]
    21. International Youth Year, 1985, by Universal House of Justice (1985). Two letters, giving words of inspiration and guidance for the International Youth Year, 1985. [about]
    22. Internet Guidance, by Bahá'í Internet Agency (2004). Links to a variety of guidelines for online media: responding to opposition online; how to do podcasting and blogging; netiquette; SEO and hosting websites; using social networking sites; compilation on Internet communications; PowerPoint presentations. [about]
    23. Iranian Believers Throughout the World, Message to, by Universal House of Justice (1997). Inspirational discussion of the history of the Bahá'ís in Iran, including exhortations for the education of Persian children and youth. [about]
    24. Letter to John B. Cornell, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1943). Short personal letter relating answers from Shoghi Effendi to various questions of Cornell, on voting age, the election of the House, the "Source of all knowledge," etc. [about]
    25. Letter to the Ecole des Jeunes May Bolles Maxwell Conference, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1997). [about]
    26. Light Was in the Darkness, The: Reflections on the Growth that Hides in the Pain of Suffering, by Michael L. Penn, in Bahá'í World (2020). Existential stress and its relationship to individual growth and development, drawing on the rich spiritual and philosophical heritage of humanity. [about]
    27. List and Map of 114 Youth Conferences in 2013, by Bahá'í World News Service (2013). List of pages at bahai.org (offsite) with reports, descriptions, and videos of youth events across the globe. The accompanying map gives an impression of the spread of the worldwide Bahá'í community. [about]
    28. Lists of Articles, by Brent Poirier (2009). Lists of 126 articles at the author's six blog websites. [about]
    29. Maid of Heaven, The: A Personal Compilation, by Báb, The and Bahá'u'lláh (2020). Compilation of texts related to the Maid of Heaven, a personification of the “Most Great Spirit." [about]
    30. Major Themes of the Creative Word: Series of Books for Deepening and Studying, by Melanie Smith and Paul Lample (1987). Five activity books "designed to draw the student into a study of the profound concepts found in the Bahá’í Revelation." Youth Can Move the World, The Significance of Bahá’u’lláh’s Revelation, Spiritual Conquest of the Planet, The Covenant, etc. [about]
    31. Messages from the Universal House of Justice 1963-1986: Third Epoch of the Formative Age, by Universal House of Justice (1996). [about]
    32. Morning of Your Lives, The: Talk given at a Hawaiian Youth Conference, by Abu'l-Qasim Faizi, in British Bahai Journal (1975). A very short published talk. [about]
    33. Nine Holy Days, by Jackie Mehrabi (1975). Booklet geared to children and junior youth, giving an overview of all principal Bahá'í holidays, and bios of the Figures they commemorate. [about]
    34. Numeracy for the Junior Youth: Addition and Subtraction, by Boris Handal (2021). Learning materials developed for use in rural schools in India, intertwining numeracy skills with spiritual concepts for the Junior Youth age range. Reflections and quotations from the Bahá'í writings are included. [about]
    35. Papel de la Juventud en los Derechos Humanos, El, by Bahá'í International Community (1985). [about]
    36. Pioneering or Education?, by Universal House of Justice (1968). To Bahá'í youth in every land: deciding whether to pioneer or continue with higher education. [about]
    37. Politics and Engagement in the Life of Society, by Universal House of Justice (2010). On which principles should guide Iranian believers in their participation in the life of society, and other themes related to political activism and social justice. [about]
    38. Preparación para Vivir en Paz, el Papel de la Juventud, by Bahá'í International Community (1985). [about]
    39. Preparación Para Vivir En Paz, La, by Bahá'í International Community (1985). Charla presentada durante el Seminario Regional de las Naciones Unidas para Latinoamérica y el Caribe, auspiciado por la Comisión Económica y Social para Latinoamérica y el Caribe (ECLAC) 26 de febrero de 1985 [about]
    40. Provisional Translations of Selected Writings of the Báb, Baháʼuʼlláh, and ʻAbdu'l-Bahá, by Peyman Sazedj (2009). Twenty-four translations from 2009, 2010, and 2011 copied from the defunct website peyman.sazedj.org. [about]
    41. Ridván 2021: Bahá'í Era 178 (2021). Annual message to the Bahá'ís of the world. [about]
    42. Ruhi Institutes and the Five-Year Plan, by Universal House of Justice (2011). Letter to all National Spiritual Assemblies about the role of the Ruhi Institute, coordination of clusters, education of children, and training institutes in the 2011-2016 5-Year Plan. [about]
    43. Tablet of the Deathless Youth (Lawh-i-Ghulamu'l-Khuld), by Bahá'u'lláh (1996). [about]
    44. The Story of Mona: 1965-1983, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Canada (1985). Biography of Mona Mahmudnizhad, an Iranian teenager who, in 1983, together with nine other women, was sentenced to death and hanged in Shiraz on the grounds of being a member of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    45. Three Ages of Man, The: Are They Integrated?, by Viva Rodwell, in 75 Years of the Bahá'í Faith in Australasia (1996). Childhood, adulthood, old age, and family integration in contemporary culture. [about]
    46. Towards a Spiritual Methodology of Scholarship, by Chris Jones Kavelin, in Australian Baha'i Studies, Volume 4 (2003). Attempt to offer youth a vision of their sacred duty to pursue scholarship and a confidence in their unique spiritual genius to enable a world civilization to become conscious of its own Divine origin, spiritual nature, sacred purpose and glorious destiny [about]
    47. Training Institutes: Attaining a Higher Level of Functioning, by International Teaching Centre (2017). Assistance to Bahá'ís managing institutes, to help better implement the main sequence of courses, the youth spiritual empowerment and education programs, and matters related to the institutional capacity of training institutes. [about]
    48. Unrestrained as the Wind: A Life Dedicated to Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Compilation of quotations on topics of especial interest to Bahá'í youth. [about]
    49. What it is to be a Bahá'í?: A letter to the Bahá'í youth from Ruhiyyih Khanum, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1948). The object of life to a Bahá'í is to promote the oneness of mankind. [about]
    50. World Wide Web, The: An Owner's Manual for Bahá'í Youth, by Phil Christensen (2005). Guide to the Internet for Bahá'í Youth. Sites to visit, sites to avoid, and other information. [Old, not updated] [about]
    51. Younger Generation Has Always Had the Power to Reshape Our World, The, by Ted Slavin, in St. Catharines Standard (2010). Young people have a great potential to shape society. Youth trained to lead junior youth groups are called "animators"; they can help guide activist potential to achieving positive effect. [about]
    52. Your True Brother: Messages to Junior Youth Written by or on Behalf of Shoghi Effendi, by Shoghi Effendi (1991). [about]
    53. Youth, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 2 (1991). [about]
    54. Youth in Every Land, to, by Universal House of Justice, in Wellspring of Guidance (1966). Three fields of service open to young Bahá'ís: improving their personal character, teaching the Faith to others, and preparing for their later years through education. [about]
    55. Youths of today can make a difference, if we let them, by Ted Slavin, in St. Catharines Standard (2010). If given opportunity to, teens want to be helpful in their community, not just be "cool." [about]
     
    See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    See all locations, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
    .
    . .