Bahá'í Library Online
. . . .
.

Search for tag "Military"

from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1938 27 Nov In a letter to the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the British Isles, Shoghi Effendi outlined the attitudes and obligations of Bahá’ís regarding military service. [BW17:384–5; UD122–3] United Kingdom Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)
1939. 4 Jun In a letter addressed to the National Spiritual Assembly of the British Isles written on behalf of the Guardian he urged them to "appeal to the government for exemption from active military service in a combatant capacity, stressing the fact that in doing so they are not prompted by any selfish considerations but by the sole and supreme motive of upholding the Teachings of their Faith, which make it a moral obligation for them to desist from any act that would involve them in direct warfare with their fellow-humans or any other race or nation." [UD128]
  • See other correspondence on this theme: UD122; UD134; UD259
  • United Kingdom Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)
    1940 (In the year) The Canadian Department of National Defence exempted Bahá’ís from combatant military duty. Canada Exemption; Recognition; Military
    1946. 20 Jul The National Spiritual Assembly of the United States enquired of the Guardian whether the existence of the United Nations in its present form changed the attitude of the Baha'is toward military duties which might require the taking of human life. The Guardian's reply, written by his secretary, was:

      ...the Bahá'ís should continue to apply, under all circumstances, for exemption from any military duty that necessitates the taking of life. There is no justification for any change of attitude on our part at the present time.

    The Universal House of Justice amplified this later statement:

      There is no objection in a Bahá'í enlisting voluntarily in the armed forces of a country in order to obtain a training in some trade or profession, provided that he can do so without making himself liable to undertake combatant service. [BW17:384–5]
    United States Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)
    1951 Sep National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States provided guidance on military service. [BN No 247 September 1951 p4] United States Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)
    1965. 20 Sep The obligation that Bahá'ís should seek exemption from combatant service was specifically affirmed by the Universal House of Justice in a letter to the American National Spiritual Assembly. That letter said:

      It is for each believer, under pain of his own conscience, to determine for himself what his actions should be, bearing in mind that the application of these principles is the spiritual obligation of every Bahá'í. It is rather for your Assembly to see that adequate instruction is provided so that the friends will let these principles be mirrored forth in their actions, and that they will be so steadfast in their love for Bahá'u'lláh that it would be unthinkable for them to willingly place themselves in a position where they must take human life. [Universal House of Justice letter to the National Spiritual Assembly of the United States ref41]
    United States Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)
    1969 Jun For a discussion paper on the Bahá'í position on military service see War, Governance, and Conscience in This Age of Transition by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States. United States Armed forces; Military; Weapons; War (general)

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. Bahá'ís and Military Service, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States, in Bahá'í News, 88 (1965). Brief discussion on how Bahá'ís may or may not serve in the armed forces. [about]
    2. Beyond Death's Grey Land, by Sidney Edward Morrison, in dialogue magazine, 1:2 (1986). Reflections from a Bahá'í perspective on the Vietnam War, the nature of war, dehumanizing humanity, and being a soldier. [about]
    3. Celestial Burning, A: A Selective Study of the Writings of Shoghi Effendi, by Jack McLean (2012). Style, content, and context of the major writings of the Guardian; providential history; critique of Hegel; the military metaphor; the language of interpretation; history of the apostolic age. [about]
    4. Information for Bahá'ís called to fill out the Questionnaire on military duty under the Draft Act 1940, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States (1940). Summary of grounds for seeking exemption from combatant duty. [about]
    5. Military Metaphor in Bahá'í Sacred Literature, The, by Jack McLean (2005). Martial symbology is common in the Bahá'í Writings, especially those of Shoghi Effendi, yet the Writings are expressly pacifistic. This article examines the apparent contradiction. [about]
    6. Police Forces Bearing Arms, Bahá'í Enlistment in, by Universal House of Justice, in Bahá'í Studies Bulletin, 3:4 (1995). Two letters from the House on joining armed police forces, e.g. the Ulster Defence Regiment and the police force in Northern Ireland, and whether they would be allowed to bear arms. Also discussion of consummating marriage, and marrying an atheist. [about]
    7. Relationship to Government, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Three short sections: Loyalty to the government, the Bahá'í view of pacifism, and the Guardian's instructions regarding military service. [about]
    8. Saving Private Ryan: Review, by Milan Voykovic and Shamim Razavi, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Review of film, with thoughts for Bahá'ís: Is there such a thing as a "just war"? What forms of "sacrifice" can be justified? When should collective ethics override individual conscience? [about]
    9. Star Wars or World Peace, by Dan Q. Posin, in dialogue magazine, 1:1 (1986). How a "missile defense system" might work and ways in which it would not, ramifications for achieving global peace, and discussion by Robert Bowman, the first director of the Star Wars program. No mention of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    10. Unrestrained as the Wind: A Life Dedicated to Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Compilation of quotations on topics of especial interest to Bahá'í youth. [about]
    11. War, Governance, and Conscience in This Age of Transition, by National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States, in The Bahá'í National Review, 20 (1969). A whitepaper on issues of Bahá'í involvement in the military services. [about]
     
    See all tags, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    See all locations, sorted numerically or alphabetically.

    Home Site Map Forum Links Copyright About Contact
    .
    . .