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  2. from the Chronology Canada
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from the Chronology

date event locations tags see also
1862 – 1868 Hájí Mírzá Muhammad-‘Alí, a cousin of the Báb, lived in Shanghai during this period. This is the first record of a Bábí or Bahá'í living in China. [PH24]
  • From 1870 he lived in Hong Kong dealing as a merchant and was joined by his brother, Hájí Mírzá Muhammad Husayn. [PH24; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 2min56sec]
  • Shanghai; Hong Kong; China Haji Mirza Muhammad-Ali (Afnan); Haji Mirza Muhammad Husayn (Afnan); Afnan; Bab, Family of; First Bahais by country or area
    1881 - 1882 A nephew of the wife of the Báb, Mirza Ibrahim, resided in Hong Kong. [Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 4min5 sec] Hong Kong; China China; Hong Kong
    1888 (In the year) Jamál Effendi, accompanied by Hájí Faraju'lláh-i-Tafrishí, embarked on a long journey to the East visiting Burma, Java (Indonesia), Siam (Thailand), Singapore, Kashmir, Tibet, Yarqand, Khuqand in Chinese Turkistan, and Afghanistan. [EB123–4; PH22] Myanmar (Burma); Java; Indonesia; Siam (Thailand); Thailand; Singapore; Kashmir; India; Tibet; Yarqand; Khuqand; Chinese Turkistan; China; Afghanistan Jamal Effendi; Haji Farajullah-i-Tafrishi
    1891. (In the year) Mirzá Adu'l-Fadl-i-Gulpáygání visited Kashgar during his trip to Central Asia. [Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 2min56sec] Kashkar, China China
    1897 (In the year) Hájí Mírzá Muhammad-`Alí, the first Bahá'í to have settled China, died in Bombay on his way back to Shíráz. [PH24]
  • He lived in China from 1962 until 1868. He moved to Hong Kong in 1970 and was joined by his brother Haji Mirza Muhammad Husayn (Haji Mirza Buzurg) where they established a trading company. The brothers stayed in Hong Kong until 1897. [Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 2min56sec]
  • China; Mumbai (Bombay); India Haji Mirza Muhammad-Ali (Afnan); Afnan; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1901 (In the year) The Faith is introduced to China by a Persian. [Major events of the Century of Light prepared by Dr. Ahmadi] China
    1902. Two Persians from Ischabad, 'Aqá Mírzá Mihdi Rashti and 'Aqá Mírzá Abdu-i-Baki Yazdi arrived in Shanghi. Mirza Rashti passed away in Shanghi in 1924 [Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 5min10sec] Shanghai, China China
    1909 Nov Charles Mason Remey and Howard Struven left the United States on the first Bahá'í teaching trip to circle the globe. [BFA2:348, GPB261]
  • They went to Hawaii, Japan, Shanghai, Singapore, Hong Kong and to Burma, India and `Akká. [BFA2:348–50; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 2min56sec]
  • Hawaii; Japan; Shanghai; China; Singapore; Myanmar (Burma); India; Akka Charles Mason Remey; Howard Struven; Travel teaching
    1910 (In the year) Charles Mason Remey and Howard Struven arrived in Shanghai and met with Áqá Mírzá `Abdu'l-Baqí Yazdí. They were probably the first Bahá'ís from the West to go to China. [PH25; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 5min45sec] Shanghai; China Charles Mason Remey; Howard Struven; Aqa Mirza Abdul-Baqi Yazdi; Firsts, Other
    1914 (In the year) Mr Husayn Uskuli and two Bahá'ís friends arrived in Shanghai from 'Ishqábád. His family joined him later. [PH28-29, BW13p871-872]

    The war years 1937-1945 were difficult for him and the conditions following the victory of the Chinese Communist Party made it impossible to have contact with the local people yet he remained.

  • He spent all his remaining years but for a few in Shanghai where he passed away on the 25th of February, 1956 and was laid to rest in the Shanghai Kiangwan cemetery. [Video Early History of the Bahá'ís of China 6min 33 sec]
  • Ishqabad; Turkmenistan; Shanghai; China Husayn Uskuli
    1914 Spring Laura and Hippolyte Dreyfus Barney started their teaching trip to China and French Indonesia. They visited the German colony of Qingdao, China with a plan to travel up the Yangzi river (and overland) to Kunming, Yunnan Province. However due to the outbreak of the first world war they returned to Europe, escaping from Qingdao thanks to Hippolyte’s adroitness. They returned to France in time for him to assume his military obligations. [Iranica] China; French Indonesia Laura Clifford Barney; Hippolyte Dreyfus-Barney
    1915. Aug Martha Root made a brief stopover in Dalian, Manchuria en route from Yokohama to the Hawaiian Islands. It was to be the first of four visits to China. [MR70; SYH59; PH30; Film Early History of the Baha'í Faith in China 10 min 45 sec ]] Manchuria,China Martha Root
    1916 Apr or May The first Chinese Bahá'í in China, Chen Hai An (Harold A. Chen), became a Bahá'í while studying at the University of Chicago through the efforts of Dr Zia Baghdádí. He returned to Shanghai that same year. [PH29-30; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 6min40sec]
  • PH30 says this was 1919 but this is clearly a typographical error.
  • He returned to China in December 1916.
  • China; Chicago; United States First Bahais by country or area; Zia Bagdadi
    1917. (In the year) At this time there were eleven Persian Bahá'ís in Shanghai. Through the efforts of Aqa Mirza Ahmad and Ridi Tabrizi a Bahá'í pamphlet was published, probably the first Bahá'í publication in the Chinese language. It included 'Abdu'l-Bahá's twelve principles and passages from His explanation of the spiritual significance of the European War. The pamphlet include a picture of 'Abdu'l-Bahá and was also published in Persian. [PH31; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 7 min 42 sec] Shanghai, China Publications
    1917 3 Apr 'Abdu'l-Bahá's exhortation on China was published in the Star of the West on the 28th of April, 1917. "China, China, China, China-ward the Cause of Baha'o'llah must march! Where is that holy, sanctified Bahai to become the teacher of China! China has most great capability. The Chinese people are most simple-hearted and truth-seeking." and "China is the country of the future." [SotW_Vol-01 (Mar 1910)-Vol-10 (Mar 1919) p2127/2922]
  • See as well PG99-100 for His Tablet to Chen Ting Mo.
  • China Chen Ting Mo; Abdul-Baha, Life of; Abdul-Baha, Writings and talks of; Pioneering; Travel teaching
    1920 - 1922 Laura and Hippolyte Dreyfus-Barney visited China and the Far East from 1920 to 1922. [Film Early History of the Baha'í Faith in China 8 min 23 sec ] China Hippolyte Dreyfus-Barney; Laura Dreyfus-Barney
    1921. (In the year) The first publication in Chinese was published by the Bahá'ís in Shanghai. [Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 7min40sec] Shanghai,China
    1923. 25 Apr Martha Root left Osaka for northern China. [PH31; [Film Early History of the Baha'í Faith in China 11 min 35 sec and 15 min 40 sec]
  • It was her second visit to China and lasted until March 1924. [PH31-2]
  • In June she was joined by Ida Finch. After an earthquake hit Japan she was joined by Agnes Alexander. On the 4th of November they held the first Feast in Beijing.
  • Beijing, China Martha Root
    1923 4 Nov The first recorded Bahá'í Feast in China was held in Beijing. [PH33]
  • Martha Root and Agnes Alexander were present. [PH33]
  • Beijing; China Nineteen Day Feast; Martha Root; Agnes Alexander
    1927. 27 Mar Martha Root left Shanghai for Hong Kong. At the end of May she sailed for Australia and New Zealand. During her stay in Hong Kong she made a trip to mainland China visiting Guangzhou and made another sortie to Saigon and Cambodia. [P35] Shanghai,China; Hong Kong; Saigon,Vietnam; Cambodia; Loas Martha Root
    1930. 22 Aug Martha Root returned to China for her third visit and stayed two months. She sailed from Shanghai on the 22nd of October 1930. [PH39-41; Film Early History of the Baha'í Faith in China 13min 46 sec ] Hong Kong; Shanghai,China Martha Root
    1931 (In the year) The first Chinese translation of Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era was published. [PH36]
  • The translation was made by Dr Tsao Yun-siang, President of the Xinhua University in Beijing. [PH36]
  • Beijing; China Bahaullah and the New Era (book); Esslemont; First translations; Translation; Publications
    1937. Jun Martha Root made her final trip to China, arriving in Shanghai from Japan. She was evacuated on the 14th of August because Shanghai was under bombardment from the Japanese forces. From there she sailed to the Philippines, arriving in Manila on the 20th of August. [PH41; Film Early History of the Baha'í Faith in China 25 min 46 sec ] Shanghai,China Martha Root
    1954. 22 Oct Mr and Mrs Suleimani arrived in Keelung, Taiwan by ship. They spent the rest of their lives there.

    Ridvaniyyih Suleimani served on the Auxiliary Board and the National Spiritual Assembly. She passed away in Taiwan on the 18th of March 1981. [BW18p752-754]

    Suleiman Suleimani served on the National Spiritual Assembly of Taiwan from its formation in 1967 until 1978. He also served as a deputy of the institution of the Huqúqu'lláh for about two decades. [BW20p889-891]

    The Suleimanis, originally from Iran, had lived for about 28 years in Shanghai where Mrs Ridvaniyyih Suleimani's father, Mr Husayn Ouskouli Uskuli (or Uskui) had long resided and conducted a business. Mr and Mrs Suleimani had left Shanghai permanently in 1950 because of the difficult situations for foreigners in China but Mr Ouskouli decided to stay on and won the admiration of the Guardian. He died in Shanghai at the age of 86. [The Taiwan Bahá'í Chronicle by Barbara R. Sims p3; PH39; Video Early history of the Bahá'í Faith in China 7 min 57 sec]

    Keelung; Taiwan; Shanghai; China Knights of Bahaullah; Suleimani, Mr. and Mrs.; Husayn Ouskouli Uskuli
    1956 25 Feb Husayn Uskuli, (b. 1875) long-time pioneer to Shanghai from ‘Ishqábád, passed away in Shanghai at the age of 82 and was buried in the Kiangwan Cemetery in Shanghai. [PH29, BW13p871-873]
  • He had heard about the Faith at the age of 18 from Mírzá Haydar-'Alí. After his marriage he moved to 'Ishqábád where he was very active in the community. After his move to Shanghai his home was the centre of activity and hospitality for all those passing through. He was the only foreign-born Bahá'í to remain in China after the regime change. The xenophobic attitude of the government precluded any meaningful contact with the local citizenry.
  • He was survived by four daughters and a son.
  • Ishqabad; Turkmenistan; Shanghai; China Husayn Uskuli; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    1970. 18 or 20 Mar The passing of Hilda Yank Sing Yen Male (b. 29 Nov or 29 Nov 1902, 1904 or 1906 in China, d. Riverdale, Bronx County, New York, USA). She was buried at the Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum, Hartsdale, New York, USA.
  • In Memoriam. [BW15p476-478; PH54-56]
  • A note from Mrs. Mildred Mottahedeh. read, in part: "This noble lady played an important role in the development of the Bahá'í Faith in the international field, and it was through her efforts that the Bahá'ís began their work with the United Nations." [BN No 472 July 1970 p2]
  • For a biography see Wikipedia.
  • She asked to attend the 1944 Baháʼí Annual convention as an observer and was moved by the spontaneous gestures of welcome and care shown between individuals society normally kept apart. She requested to enroll as a Baháʼí. She then asked to address the convention as a Baháʼí:

    "Fellow Baha'is, this is more than a pleasure. It is a miracle that I am participating with you in discussing such important matters. I contacted two denominations and a parliament of religions before I met Julia Goldman, Baha'i, who sowed this seed in my heart. While convalescent from a flying crash, my life was given me for service to God. Julia took me under her wing. I saw God vaguely; then more clearly, through the Baha'i Faith. Then came the battle of Hongkong(sic) where all shared in a common danger and hunger - forced to live the oneness of mankind. At length I secured a priority to fly to America and how do I rejoice to be in this free country! Conferring with Americans I have found this country the best to execute the message of peace. I have been blessed in meeting other Baha'is. I have been deeply impressed by the love and affection among Baha'is. China is well prepared by its sages for the Baha'i Faith. …" [BN No 170 September 1944 p6]

  • Find a grave.
  • Riverdale, NY; China Hilda Yen; United Nations; BIC; Bahai International Community; In Memoriam
    1989 25 Jun The Universal House of Justice said in a message it was timely for the knowledge of the Bahá'í Faith to be disseminated on the mainland of China as quickly as possible. [PH80]
  • Also see [SWvol13no7pg185; VV104]
  • China UHJ
    1990 (In the year) The Bádi Foundation was established in Macao through an initial endowment in honour of Badi'u'llah Farid and Shidrokh Amirkia Bagha, who were outstanding examples of dedication, service and self-sacrifice for the well-being of humankind. The fundamental purpose animating the Bádi Foundation has always been to contribute, however modestly, to the spiritual and material progress of China. [Website]
  • Its projects include:
    • Early Childhood Education: The award winning Hidden Gems Programme, implemented by educational organizations across Asia, includes content in the areas of mathematics, science, and character development for children aged 3 to 6.
    • Junior Youth Program: Drawing on the talents of a group of youth volunteers and working in partnership with a number of local educational institutions, the Moral Empowerment through Language Programme seeks to release the potential of 12-15 year olds to contribute to the transformation of their communities.
    • School of the Nations offers education to over 600 students from kindergarten through high school in Macao. The school offers programmes characterized by academic rigor and an integrated approach to the moral and intellectual development of its students.
    • The Centre for Continuing Education at School of the Nations offers a range of educational programmes seeking to promote community well-being. Its aim is to provide quality, innovative learning opportunities to a growing number of people, of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Macau; China Social and Economic Development Organizations; Badi Foundation
    1995 30 Aug – 8 Sep Some 400-500 Bahá'í women and men from more than 50 countries around the world participated in the NGO Forum on Women at the Fourth United Nations International Conference on Women held in the resort city of Huairou some 50 kilometers north of Beijing.
  • See One Country Vol 7 Issue 2 for profiles of some of the attendees.
  • Bahá'í perspectives on equality were also shared with both Conference and Forum participants through distribution of The Greatness Which Might Be Theirs , a collection of Bahá'í International Community statements and essays by Bahá'ís reflecting on the Agenda and Platform for Action. The booklet's title is drawn from the words of `Abdu'l-Bahá: "As long as women are prevented from attaining their highest possibility, so long will men be unable to achieve the greatness which might be theirs."
  • See Towards the Goal of Full Partnership: One Hundred and Fifty Years of the Advancement of Women by Ann Boyles written in anticipation of the conference. It is a survey of the Bahá’í community's efforts to understand and practice the principle of equality between men and women. [BW93-94p237-275]
  • Beijing; China; Huairou, China United Nations; Women; Baha'i International Community; BIC statements
    1995. 4 - 15 Sep Fourth World Conference on Women was held at the Beijing International Conference Centre. It was one of the largest international meetings ever convened under United Nations auspices, some 17,000 people were registered including 5,000 delegates from 189 states and the European Union, 4,000 NGO representatives, and more than 3,200 members of the media. [BW95-96p151-158]
  • See Equality, Development, and Peace: Baha'is and the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women and NGO Forum. [BW95-96p145-158]
  • The conference was called by the United Nations to review progress made toward implementation of the "Forward-looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women" adopted at the Third World Conference in Nairobi in 1985.
  • Seven Bahá'í delegations were accredited to the conference: the Bahá'í International Community, the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States, the Bahá'í community of the Netherlands, the Bahá'í community of Canada, l' Association Bahá'íe de Femmes (France), l' Association médicale Bahá'íe (France), and the National Bahá'í Office for the Advancement of Women (Nigeria).
  • By the end of the conference it was determined that much remains to be done, and a Declaration and Platform for Action was adopted aimed at launching a global campaign to bring women into full and equal participation in all spheres of public and private life worldwide. The Platform addressed twelve critical areas of concern: poverty, education, health, violence, armed conflict, economic structures, power sharing and decision-making, mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, human rights, the media, the environment, and the girl child.
  • The Greatness Which Might Be Theirs: Protection of Women's Rights
  • The BIC distributed the statement The Role of Religion in Promoting the Advancement of Women. The Bahá'í International Community and and the parallel Non-Governmental Organization Forum,
  • In year 2000, the follow-up documant for the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action entitled Beijing +5 Political Declaration and Outcome which reviewed progress towards the Platform for Action five years after its adoption.
  • Beijing; China United Nations; Bahai International Community; Women; BIC statements

    from the Chronology Canada

    date event locations tags see also
    1932. (in the year) f. St. George Spendlove visited Shanghai after his pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He travelled to Nanjing and Beijing before proceeding to Japan. [PH49} George Spendlove

    from the Main Catalogue

    1. 1/2, by Yang Juan (2006). An existential yet emotionally-charged dialogue between two young women. [about]
    2. Bahá'í country notes: China, by Graham Hassall (1997). History of the Bahá'í community in China. [about]
    3. Bahá'í Communities by Country: Research Notes, by Graham Hassall (2000). Brief notes on the history of Bahá'í activities and the dates of NSA formation in Africa, China, Australia, and elsewhere. [about]
    4. Brothers and Sisters: Buddhism in the Family of Chinese Religion, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The endurance of Confucianism for 2,000 years is partly because Buddhism and Taoism were content to play a subordinate role and not infringe upon the "Chinese Great Tradition"; implications of Buddhism's role in relation to new religions in China. [about]
    5. Challenge of Change for the Chinese in Southeast Asia, The, by Yin Hong Shuen, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Chinese Bahá'ís in some Asian countries are a microcosm of Chinese people in this region. An email survey asked what attracts Southeast Asians to the Faith, difficulties they face, and how adopting a world religion helps guide their future challenges. [about]
    6. Chinese Religions: Evolution, Compatibility and Adaptability - A Historical Perspective, by Kow Mei Kao, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Case study of the history of Chinese civilization through the formation of the three major religions in imperial China: Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism; their compatibility, adaptability, and mutual influences in their early development. [about]
    7. Choice of the West for Abdu'l-Bahá's Epoch-Making Trip, The, by Baharieh Rouhani Ma'ani, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Reasons for Abdu'l-Bahá choosing Western nations for the climax of his ministry, and results he achieved in Europe and the United States. [about]
    8. Common Teachings from Chinese Culture and the Bahá'í Faith: From Material Civilization to Spiritual Civilization, by Albert Cheung, in Lights of Irfan, Book 1 (2000). An examination of the similarities in belief between the Bahá'í Faith and traditional Chinese culture. [about]
    9. Concept of the Manifestation of God in Chinese Symbolism: An Inter-civilizational Hermeneutic Study, by Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). Seemingly incompatible symbols can point to a common underlying meaning, connecting worldviews and perspectives often considered incommensurable. There are elements of the Chinese tradition that resonate deeply with the Bahá’í concept of Manifestation. [about]
    10. Der Messianismus des frühen 19. Jahrhunderts und die Entstehung der Baha'i Religion, by Kamran Ekbal, in Iran im 19. Jahrhundert und die Entstehung der Bahá'í Religion, eds. Johann Christoph Bürgel and Isabel Schayani (1998). On the resurgence of a millenarianistic climate in the 19th century from China through the Middle-East to the USA. It highlights the millenniarist mood in Iran at the time of the beginnings of the Bábí and Bahai religions. [about]
    11. Dialogue Among Civilizations: Ancient and Future, Transitions and Potentials, by Theo A. Cope, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Many ideas in Chinese civilization resonate with Bahá'í thought. The I Ching highlights differences between western and eastern philosophy, the notion of embodiment in the Confucian view of the noble person, and transforming material to spiritual. [about]
    12. Dialogue between Yin-Yang Concepts and the Bahá'í Faith, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). Yin-yang, a pivotal theory in Chinese thought influencing government, architecture, relationships, and ethics, has many similarities with the Bahá’í Faith, including the origin of matter, the nature of history, man-woman relationships, and health. [about]
    13. Divine Qualities of Spiritual Dialogue, by Piya Tan, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 6 (2001). The Buddhist basis for dialogue is found in its four virtues: love (the world as an extended family), compassion (listening to others), altruistic joy (learning from their success and beliefs) and equanimity (courage to accept the spirituality of others). [about]
    14. Eyes of the Children, The, by Sheila Banani, in dialogue magazine, 1:2 (1986). One poem inspired by female infanticide in China. [about]
    15. Future of Confucianism, The, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). The history of Confucianism, its teachings, a critique of its place in the modern world, its future, and its survival into the 21st century. [about]
    16. Great Tao, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:2 (1991). On a philosophy of the ancient Chinese people, a Tao whose eternal spirit has seeped into the very heart of Chinese tradition, culture, and way of life for centuries; similarities with other religions and the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    17. History of the Bahá'í Faith in Japan 1914-1938, by Agnes Baldwin Alexander (1977). An account of the Bahá'í Cause in Japan, China, Korea, and the Hawaiian Islands, prepared by request of the Guardian. [about]
    18. In Memoriam: Heshmat Shariary (1934-2018), in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). Overview of the life of an active participant in the Irfan Colloquia and Bahá'í studies. [about]
    19. Influence of Bábí Teachings on Ling Ming Tang and Nineteenth-century China, The, by Jianping Wang, in Lights of Irfan, Book 3 (2002). A possible historical linkage between the followers of Bábí and Bahá'i Movements in Iran and the believers of a Qadiriyya Order (the Ling Ming Tang) in China. [about]
    20. Introduction to the Doctrines of Soul and Enlightenment in Mahayana Buddhism and the Bahá'í Faith, An, by Yeo Yew Hock, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). The development of Mahayana and how the Chinese people adopted and adapted it; non-self/enlightenment vs. the "True Poverty and Absolute Nothingness" of the Seven Valleys; sunyata/emptiness and Buddhist monism vs. the Valley of Unity's nonduality. [about]
    21. Jamál Effendi and the early history of the Bahá'í Faith in South Asia, by Moojan Momen, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). Includes maps on Jamal Effendi's journeys in India, and journeys in Southeast Asia. [about]
    22. Language of the Heart, The: Parallels between Chinese and Bahá'í Approaches to the Spiritual Self, by Sim Tze Hong, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 4 (1999). Parallels between Chinese and Confucian thought vs. Bahá'í teachings about the spiritual self, the nature of the heart, the pathway to perfection, the knowledge of oneself, and symbolism in language like "open heart" and "use heart." [about]
    23. Laozi: A Lost Prophet?, by Roland Faber, in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). On the Tao Te Ching, or Dao De Jing; the uniqueness of Toaism/Daoism; resonances with and differences from the Bahá’í universe; should Doaism be considered a genuine dispensation of a divine Manifestation. [about]
    24. Life, Death and Immortality: The Taoist Religion in Singapore and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 2 (1997). Main features of Taoist practices in Singapore compared with Bahá'í which, at first glance, could not be more disparate; whether unity may be found behind the apparent dichotomy; spanning the gulf between these two distinct religions from different times. [about]
    25. Look at Harmony and Unity as Common Principles in the Confucian System and the Bahá'í Faith, A, by Benjamin Olshin, in Studies in Bahá'í Philosophy, vols. 2-3 (2014). Confucianism and the Bahá'í Faith represent complex and multi-faceted systems of philosophy, practice, and belief that resonate strongly with each other. The goal of both is for human beings to live in a society characterized by harmony and ethics. [about]
    26. Perfection and Refinement: Towards an Aesthetics of the Bab, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). The writings of the Bab have implications for the "plastic" arts; significance for native traditions; relevance to the performing arts; and the concept of refinement which comes across in both the person and the writings of the Báb. [about]
    27. Permissibility of Chinese New Year Celebrations and Cultural Prostrations, by Universal House of Justice (2019). Permissibility of observing Chinese New Year; prostrating is permissible for cultures in which prostrations do not signify submission or humiliation, but are merely gestures of respect or politeness. [about]
    28. Religious Chic, by Zuo Xuan, in Global Times (2010). A portrait of the Bahá'ís in contemporary China. [about]
    29. Science and Religion in Chinese Culture, by Anjam Khursheed, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 5 (2000). Religion lies at the root of philosophy and civilization during the Tang (618-907) and Sung (960-1279) dynasties. Cultural achievements during these periods were influenced by Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism, but modern sciences did not develop. [about]
    30. Soul in Chinese and Bahá'í Belief, The, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Singapore Bahá'í Studies Review, vol. 3 (1998). On Chinese religions and the Bahá'í Faith; their beliefs in the presence of a soul and an afterlife; the nature of the soul and the human being; the human quest for happiness and meaning in life; free will and its relation to justice. [about]
    31. Yínyáng Cosmology and the Bahá'í Faith, by Phyllis Ghim-Lian Chew, in Lights of Irfan, 14 (2013). The yin-yang concept is pivotal to Chinese thought, culture, government, and ethics. It also bears many similarities with Bahá'í philosophy and practice. [about]
     
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