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1905. 5 Sep The Treaty of Portsmouth formally ended the 1904–05 Russo-Japanese War. It was signed on September 5, 1905,[1] after negotiations from August 6 to August 30, at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, United States.[2] U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt was instrumental in the negotiations and won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts. Were it not for US diplomacy and the military restraint displayed by the other European nations, the Russo-Japanese war might have become the first world war. [Wikipedia]
  • According to some historians, the 1905 Russo-Japanese War was the first truly modern war, involving as it did both the telegraph and the telephone, along with machine guns, barbed wire, illuminating star shells, mine fields, advanced torpedoes, and armored battleships. The war's resolution might also be called the world's first modern “peace,” inasmuch as its end came about through perhaps the first use of so-called multi-track diplomacy, involving not only the belligerents but also the United States and, significantly, input from civil society. [One Country]
  • Portsmouth; New Hampshire Portsmouth Peace Treaty; Theodore Roosevelt
    1912 25 Jul Talk at Hotel Victoria, Boston, Massachusetts. [PUP244]
  • `Abdu'l-Bahá left Boston and arrived in Dublin, New Hampshire, the same evening. [239D:117; AB233; SBR82, APD72-73]
  • In 2012 the Dublin Inn was purchased and donated to the national Bahá'í community by Gisu Mohadjer Cook, a World Bank executive and daughter of Hand of the Cause of God and Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Rahmatu'lláh Muhájir.
  • Dublin; New Hampshire; Boston; Massachusetts; United States Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha, Talks at public places; Gisu Mohadjer Cook; Rahmatullah Muhajir
    1912 26 Jul `Abdu'l-Bahá's and His companions took up residence at one of the two Parsons home in Dublin, NH, a resort area. The house in question is named "Day-Spring". [APD7376]
  • See FMH49.
  • Dublin; New Hampshire; United States Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Agnes Parsons
    1912 28 Jul `Abdu'l-Bahá's spoke at the Parsons home. [APD79-80] Dublin; New Hampshire; United States Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha, Talks at homes
    1912 5 Aug Talk at Dublin Inn, Dublin, New Hampshire. [PUP245] Dublin; New Hampshire; United States Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha, Talks at public places
    1912 6 Aug Talk at Home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Parsons, Dublin, New Hampshire. [PUP247] Dublin; New Hampshire; United States Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha, Talks at homes; Arthur Parsons
    1912 11 Aug Howard Colby Ives visited 'Abdu'l-Bahá at an inn where He was staying in the mountain summer resort of Dublin, New Hampshire. At this time he was still the preacher of the Brotherhood Church and was studying all available literature on the Faith. Subsequent to the visit he received his first tablet from 'Abdu'l-Baha dated the 26th of August. [PtF124-131; SEBW144] Dublin; New Hampshire Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Abdul-Baha; Howard Colby Ives
    1982 9 Jun The passing of Richard Edward St. Barbe Baker (b. 9 October, 1889 West End, Hampshire, England d. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan)
  • He was one of the foremost world famous environmentalists of the twentieth century, an ecologist, conservationist, forester, vegetarian, horseman, apiarist, author of some thirty books and numerous articles and a committed Bahá’í who rendered service to the Bahá’í Faith for more than fifty years.
  • He formally founded the Men of the Trees organization in England in 1924 and it soon spread to many other countries. (Shoghi Effendi enrolled as the first life member of the Men of the Trees.) Now known in many countries as the International Tree Foundation, it has a large membership of women and men from all walks of life. In 1978 Charles, Prince of Wales, became the society’s patron. [Bahá'í Chronicles, BW18p802-805]
  • See BWNS1292.
  • He was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
  • See photo.
  • Hampshire; United Kingdom; Saskatoon; Saskatchewan; Canada Richard St Barbe Baker; Men of the Trees; International Tree Foundation; Environment; In Memoriam; Births and deaths; Cemeteries and graves

    from the main catalogue

    1. Finishing the Work: `Abdu'l-Bahá in Dublin, New Hampshire, 1912, by Phillip E. Tussing (2007). Overview of Abdu'l-Bahá's three-week visit to a small town in northeast United States. [about]
     
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