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from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1852 (Between Oct - Nov) The revelation of Rashh-i-Ama (The Clouds of the Realms Above) while in the Síyáh-Chál in Tehran. This tablet is considered to be among the first revealed by Bahá'u'lláh after being apprised that He was to be the Manifestation of God.
  • See P&M295-196(1969), 298-299(1987) where states, "...the First Call gone forth from His lips than the whole creation was revolutionized, and all that are in the heavens and all that are on earth were stirred to the depths". What was "the First Call"?. See GPB121, “These initial and impassioned outpourings of a Soul struggling to unburden itself, in the solitude of a self-imposed exile (many of them, alas lost to posterity) are, with the Tablet of Kullu’t-Tá’am and the poem entitled Rashh-i-‘Amá, revealed in Ṭihrán, the first fruits of His Divine Pen.”
  • See also RoB1p45-52 for information on "The First Emanations of the Supreme Pen". Taherzadeh explains that this tablet has great significance in Islamic prophecy where it is said that when the Promised One appears He will utter one word that will cause the people to flee Him. Islamic prophecy also holds that the well-known saying, "I am He" will be fulfilled. In this tablet and many that were to follow, Bahá'u'lláh proclaims that "I am God".
    Taherzadeh also states Bahá'u'lláh disclosed for the first time one of the unique features of His Revelation, namely, the advent of the "Day of God".
    "In a language supremely beautiful and soul-stirring, He attributes these energies to Himself. His choice of words, and the beauty, power, depth and mystery of this poem...are such that they may well prove impossible to translate." [RoB1p45]
  • In 2019 an authorized translation of this poem was published in the collection The Call of the Divine Beloved.
  • See a study outline by Jonah Winters (1999).
  • See Clouds and the Hiding God: Observations on some Terms in the Early Writing of Bahá'u'lláh by Moshe Sharon published in Lights of Irfan, Vol 13, 2012,p363-379 for an exploration of the mystical terms found in the Tablet.
  • Tihran; Iran Rashh-i-Ama (Sprinkling from the Cloud of Unknowing); Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Poetry of; Poetry; Call of the Divine Beloved (book); Siyah Chal (Black Pit); Bahaullah, Birth of revelation of
    1854 10 Apr - 1856 19 Mar Bahá'u'lláh in Sulaymaniyyih
    Bahá'u'lláh suddenly left Baghdád and went to the mountainous wilderness of Sar Galu, around Sulaymaniyyah in Iraqi Kurdistán. [BKG115-122; DB585; GPB120-124; TN38; CH256; KI250-251; AB392]
  • Before He left, Bahá'u'lláh asked His family to look after Mírzá Yahyá during His absence. [CB70–1; CH50–1,]
  • Bahá'u'lláh lived for some time as a dervish in a cave on the mountain of Sar-Galú. He took the name Darvísh Muhammad-i-Írání to conceal His true identity. [BBD214–15; BBRSM:60–1; BKG116–19; GPB120–1; TN38–9]
  • See photo.
  • This action compares to Moses' going out to the desert of Sinai, to Buddha's retreat to the wilds of India, to Christ's walk in the wilderness and to Muhammad's withdrawal to the hills of Arabia. [BKG114]
  • Áqá Abu'l-Qásim-i-Hamadání was His only companion. Áqá Abu'l-Qásim was killed by thieves on a journey to collect money and provisions. [BKG116–17]
  • "It was this period of voluntary seclusion, following shortly after the execution of the Báb in 1850, which bequeathed to history irrevocable proof that Bahá'u'lláh and not His half-brother, Subhi-Ezel, was, in reality, the one celebrated by the Báb and for whom the Bábí Movement was the spiritual preparation. By this act of voluntary retirement, Bahá'u'lláh gave Sebhi-Ezel unhampered opportunity to exercise the spiritual leadership over the Bábís which the latter claimed as his right. The result, however, demonstrated Subhi-Ezel's utter incapacity to maintain unity among the Bábís, inspire them with faith and confidence sufficient to meet their many difficulties and guide them along lines of true future progress. Nonother than the return of Bahá'u'lláh could re-quicken the flames of their ardour or supply them with the more universal principles of conduct and faith required to transform the Bábí Movement into a world religion." [BW2Surveyp33]
  • It was during this time that Bahá'u'lláh revealed the poem Qasídiyi-i-‘Izz-i-Varqá'íyyih (Ode of the Dove). It was composed of 2,000 couplets but Bahá'u'lláh allowed only 127 to be preserved. [BBD215; BKG118; GPB123]
  • See BKG114, GPB117–19 and K1250 for reasons for Bahá'u'lláh's retirement.
  • Before and during His absence no fewer than 25 people claimed to be the One promised by the Báb. [BBRSM29, 59; EB269; GPB125]
    • As his position as nominal head deteriorated Mírzá Yahyá became more desperate, he had one such claimant, Mírzá Asadu'lláh Khí'í Dayyán, assassinated around 1856. [Bahá'u'lláh and the Naqshbandí Sufis in Iraq by Juan Cole p4]
  • See BKG115–19 and GPB120 for Bahá'u'lláh's activities while in Kurdistán.
  • See KI248–51 for Bahá'u'lláh's own account of the episode.
  • See BKG119–22 and GPB124–6 for the condition of the Bábí community in Baghdád during this period.
  • The son born to Navváb shortly after the family's arrival in Baghdád became ill and died during Bahá'u'lláh's absence. [CB71; CH51–2]
  • See SBBR2:1–28 for Bahá'u'lláh's contact with Súfís.
  • BW16:528 for an account of Daoud Toeg, who visited the caves of Sar-Galú and photographed them in August of 1940.
  • Also see Bahá'í News No 145 July 1941 p11 and 12.
  • Kurdistan; Baghdad; Sulaymaniyyih; Iraq Bahaullah, Writings of; Bahaullah, Life of; Dervishes; Sulaymaniyyih; Sar-Galu; Aqa Abul-Qasim-i-Hamadani; Poetry; Qasidiyyih-Varqaiyyih (Ode of the Dove); Navvab (Asiyih Khanum); Mirza Yahya (Subh-i-Azal); Sufism; Mysticism; Daoud Toeg; Caves; Interfaith dialogue; Bahaullah, Basic timeline; - Basic timeline, Expanded; Bahaullah, Life of; Sulaymaniyyih; Dayyan (Mirza Asadullah)
    1980 25 Feb Robert Hayden, much-honoured American poet, passed away in Ann Arbor, Michigan. [BW18:717]
  • For his obituary see BW18:715–17.
  • See also Hatcher, From The Auroral Darkness: The Life and Poetry of Robert Hayden.
  • See Bahá'í World 1994-95 pg249 for an article by Anne Boyles entitled "The Language of the Heart: Arts in the Bahá'í World Community" for mention of Robert Hayden.
  • See The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature entry about Robert Hayden.
  • In 1976, Mr. Hayden was named Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, a post which was later renamed Poet Laureate of the United States. He was the first African-American to hold the position. He taught at Fisk University in Nashville for 23 years and then at the University of Michigan from 1969 until his death in 1980 at age 66. In 2012 the US Postal Service issued a series of stamps commemorating poets which included Mr Hayden. [BWNS915]
  • Ann Arbor; Michigan Robert Hayden; Poetry; In Memoriam; Births and deaths; Poet Laureate; Commemorative stamp
    1993 10 Apr The passing of Roger White, writer, editor and "poet laureate" of the Bahá'í community, in Richmond, British Columbia (b. in Toronto on 2 June 1929).
  • Served at the World Centre for some twenty years as a secretary and as manager of the publishing department when many important new volumes were published. Under the supervision of the Universal House of Justice, he was responsible for compiling and publishing volumes XIV to XIX of The Bahá'í World, as well as editing the invaluable compendium of volumes I to XII, published in 1981.
  • Published, at his own expense, a book of poetry called Summer Window for which he did the drawing on the front cover.
  • Another Song, Another Season (1979), The Witness of Pebbles (1981) and a tender and eloquent novel which presented a semi-fictionalized account of the early days of the Bahá'í Faith in Paris, A Sudden Music, was also published by George Ronald in 1983.
  • This was followed by a biographical tribute to the poet Emily Dickinson in the form of more than 100 poems: One Bird, One Cage, One Flight (Naturegraph, 1983).
  • A short, historical account of the martyrdom of 'Alí-Asghár of Yazd entitled The Shell and the Pearl was published by George Ronald in 1984.
  • Occasions of Grace (George Ronald, 1992) was published after he retired from service in Haifa in 1991 following a major heart surgery.
  • He returned to Canada and was diagnosed with terminal cancer shortly after.
  • His last two collected works of poetry were Notes Postmarked the Mountain of God (New Leaf, 1992) and The Language of There (New Leaf, 1992).
  • He also completed the text for Raghu Rai's photographic celebration of the Bahá'í House of Worship in New Delhi, Forever in Bloom. [Bahá'í Studies Review, Vol7, 1997]
  • See Bahá'í World 1994-95 pg249 for an article by Anne Boyles entitled "The Language of the Heart: Arts in the Bahá'í World Community" for mention of Roger White.
  • See The Journal of Bahá'í Studies Vol. 26 no 1-2, 2016 p91 "Reflections on the Art of My Poetry" by John Hatcher. It is based on a telephone interview with him shortly before his passing.
  • For obituary see BW92-93p276
  • Find a grave.
  • Richmond; British Columbia; Canada Roger White; Poetry; In Memoriam; Mashriqul-Adhkar, Delhi; Lotus temple
    2017 19 Sep Mahvash Sabet, one of the seven members of the former leadership group of the Bahá'ís in Iran known as the Yaran, was released after 10 years of confinement in Iran's notorious Evin and Raja'i Shahr prisons.
  • She had been arrested in March 2008 and was now 64 years old. Mrs. Sabet distinguished herself by the loving care and kindness she extended to her fellow prisoners. As has occurred with prisoners of conscience, writers, thought-leaders, and poets who have been wrongly imprisoned throughout history, the power of Mrs. Sabet's ideas and beliefs was only amplified by her persecution. The plight of its author attracted attention to this deeply moving collection of poetry, inspiring PEN International to feature Mrs. Sabet in a campaign to defend persecuted writers. Her poems also inspired a musical composition by award-winning composer Lasse Thoresen, performed at an international music festival in Oslo earlier this year. [BWNS1198]
  • See Prison Poems.
  • See CNN article Writing to survive: Bahá'í woman's poetry was her best friend in Iranian jail.
  • Karaj; Iran Yaran; Persecution, Iran; Persecution, Court cases; Persecution, Other; Persecution; Court cases; Human rights; Evin prison; Rajai Shahr prison; Prisons; Poetry; Music; Lasse Thoresen; BWNS

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. 'Abdu'l-Bahá and Ezra Pound's Circle, by Elham Afnan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:2 (1994). On the 1911 meeting between Ezra Pound, the famous American modernist poet, and 'Abdu'l-Bahá; links between the Bahá'í Faith and a number of important avant-garde circles in the West. [about]
    2. Age of Anxiety and the Century of Light, The: Twentieth-Century Literature, the Poet's Mission, and the Vision of World Unity , by Suheil Badi Bushrui, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 13:1-4 (2003). W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, and Kahlil Gibran were writers who recognized and confronted the spiritual and intellectual crisis of their time. The mission of the poet is to bear witness, maintain the integrity of language, and express truths. [about]
    3. Ancient Poems as Means of Revelation, in an Early Tablet by Bahá'u'lláh, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). On the importance of poetry in the history of the Faith and in its Writings, and absolute detachment as a prerequisite for attainment unto the Divine Presence. Includes translation of a Tablet by Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    4. Angel Ruckus, by B. K. Filson: Review, by Albert Ouimet, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:1 (1999). [about]
    5. "Angle of Ascent", The: Process and Achievement in the Work of Robert Hayden, by Ann Boyles, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:4 (1992). Hayden's poetry explores the process of individual and collective social and spiritual transformation in the contexts of contemporary culture, the Bahá'í Faith, black history, art, literature, nature, disease, and suffering. [about]
    6. Another Song, Another Season: Poems and Portrayals, by Roger White (1979). A collection of poems and prose: sympathetic and sometimes satirical portraits of martyrs, pioneers, and ordinary people, expressed with a poet’s vision. [about]
    7. Artist, Seeker and Seer: A vocabulary and a perspective for the appreciation and creation of art inspired by the Bahá'í Writings, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Bahá'í Studies, 10 (1982). Imagery and metaphors from the Bahá'í Writings guide the appreciation and creation of art. They demonstrate that criticism vs creativity, logic vs. passion, and historicity vs. poetry have already been brought to a state of unity. [about]
    8. Ascent of Mount Carmel, The: Celebrating the Bicentenary of the Birth of the Báb, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). "From the Editor's Desk": Symbolism of the terraces on the shrine of the Bab; St. John's poem "Ascent of Mount Carmel"; overview of the articles in this issue of the Journal. [about]
    9. "At Dawn the Friend came to my bed': An Early Fruit of the Supreme Pen, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A quasidih, a dialogue between the Beloved and the Poet as a lover. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
    10. Author's Response to Commentaries on "The Purpose of Poetry", by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
    11. Bagdádi Family, by Kamran Ekbal, in Encyclopaedia Iranica (2014). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
    12. Bahá'u'lláh and the Naqshbandi Sufis in Iraq, 1854-1856, by Juan Cole, in Studies in the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions, Volume 2 (1984). The interplay of Bábí themes of messianism and the Sufi mystical emphasis on internal spirituality; analysis of an early poem by Bahá'u'lláh which hints that by the 1850s he began to see his mission of reform to carry out in the Bábí community. [about]
    13. Bahá'u'lláh's "Ode of the Dove": A Provisional Translation, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). A lengthy dialogue between Bahá'u'lláh (as persona/narrator) and the Huriyyih — the Maid of Heaven (a personification of “the Most Great Spirit”). [about]
    14. Baha'u'llah's Long Healing Prayer: Parallel Translation and Notes on Iterations / Recensions, by Daniel Azim Pschaida (2019). Comparison of minor variations between two published versions of Bahá'u'lláh's Long Healing Prayer, a transliteration parallel with the authorized translation, a memorandum from the Universal House of Justice, and a scan of the Arabic original. [about]
    15. Baha'u'llah's Notes to His "Ode of the Dove", by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). [about]
    16. Bahá'u'lláh's Persian Poems Written before 1863, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 13 (2012). Overview of the mystical early writings of Bahá'u'lláh, 1852-1863. Includes extensive bibliography, and a brief summary of each of the major works from this period. [about]
    17. Baha'u'llah's Seclusion in Kurdistan, by Bijan Ma'sumian, in Deepen, 1:1 (1993). Reconstruction of parts of this mostly undocumented period in Bahá'u'lláh's life. [about]
    18. Bahá'u'lláh's Symbolic Use of the Veiled Ḥúríyyih, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Analyzing some of the meanings behind the appearance of the Veiled Maiden, as alluded to by Bahá'u'lláh in His letters. [about]
    19. Calling, The: Tahirih of Persia and Her American Contemporaries, by Hussein Ahdieh and Hillary Chapman (2017). Simultaneous, powerful spiritual movements swept across both Iran and the U.S in the mid-1800s. On the life and martyrdom of Tahirih; the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention and the conference of Badasht; spiritualism and suffrage. [about]
    20. Chicago the Pagan, by Weimar Port (1953). 2-page description of the Bahá'í Temple in Wilmette, with a poem about it by Charles Collins published in the Chicago Tribune. [about]
    21. Coherent Chaos and Chaotic Cosmos: The Qur'ān and the Symmetry of Truth, by Todd Lawson, in Weltkonstruktionen: Religiöse Weltdeutung zwischen Chaos und Kosmos vom Alten Orient bis zum Islam (2010). While at first glance the Qur'an appears to be chaotic in form and structure, on closer examination it reveals an interconnected logic of content, performance, imagery, grammar, and poetics. Article does not mention the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    22. Collected Poems of Robert Hayden, by Robert Hayden: Review, by Harryette Mullen, in The Antioch Review, 53 (1997). [about]
    23. Creating Intimacy: In the Community and With the Seeker, by Phyllis K. Peterson (1998). On how intimacy in the Bahá'í community can be created, using Bahá’í scriptures as guideline. We hunger for intimacy, which is a prerequisite for friendship and a key principle in teaching. Cases drawn from experiences of people who feel psychically hurt. [about]
    24. Creative Circle, The: Art, Literature, and Music in Baha'i Perspective (1989). Essays on the arts including poetry, music, film, etc. and their role in the Bahá'í community. [about]
    25. Crucible, The: Poems, by Jack McLean (1995). 53 poems, some written after the passing of the author's father, Allan James McLean (d. 1995). [about]
    26. Dawn over Mount Hira and Other Essays, by Marzieh Gail (1976). A collection of essays on various topics of interest to Bahá'í studies and history. Most of these were first published in Star of the West and World Order between 1929 and 1971. [about]
    27. Days of Remembrance: Selections from the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh for Bahá'í Holy Days, by Bahá'u'lláh (2017). Forty-five selections revealed for, or relating to, nine Bahá’í Holy Days. [about]
    28. Declaration of the Bab (Poetic), by David Merrick (2008). A poetic meditation on Mulla Husayn's transformation at the Declaration of the Bab. [about]
    29. Deft Adjustment, The: English-language poetry in present-day Israel, by Roger White, in dialogue magazine, 2:2-3 (1988). Discussion of Israeli and Jewish poems, and reviews of the books Voices within the Ark, Modern Hebrew Poetry, Penguin Book of Hebrew Verse, Seven Gates: Poetry from Jerusalem, and Voices Israel. [about]
    30. Dimensions of Spirituality: Reflections on the Meaning of Spiritual Life and Transformation in Light of the Bahá'í Faith, by Jack McLean (1994). The search for truth; models and profiles of spiritual transformation; the mystical sense — prayer and meditation; a paradigm of spirituality and life tests; spiritual anthropology — the self and the soul; imagination; faith, love, and knowledge. [about]
    31. Divinations and Creation, by Horace Holley (1916). A collection of poetry. Does not mention the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    32. Drawings, Verse, and Belief, by Bernard Leach: Review, by Julie Badiee, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:3 (1989). [about]
    33. Emblems of Faithfulness: Pluralism in Meaning and Beauty in the Ordinary, by Helen Cheng and Catherine Nash, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:3 (2015). Memorials of the Faithful is notable for the diversity of personalities described, and the sheer ordinariness of many of those remembered lives. These two aspects of the text highlight some of the broader questions raised by the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    34. Emergence of a Bahá'í Consciousness in World Literature: The Poetry of Roger White, by Ron Price (2002). A study of White's verse with a short biography and an analysis of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    35. Eyes of the Children, The, by Sheila Banani, in dialogue magazine, 1:2 (1986). One poem inspired by female infanticide in China. [about]
    36. Eyewitness Account of Bahá'u'lláh's Ascension, An, by Andalib (2005). An eyewitness account of Bahá’u’lláh’s passing. [about]
    37. Family Plowing and other Prairie Poems, by Duane L. Herrmann (2019). Nine poems selected by the author, from a collection celebrating the prairie and life on and under it. [about]
    38. Fire Tablet, by Bahá'u'lláh (1937). Tablet of "The Hearts of the Sincere are Consumed in the Fire" (Lawh-i-Qad-Ihtaraqa`l-Mukhlisún). [about]
    39. Foreword, by Charles Wolcott, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Essay on the meaning of music, and the dynamics of artistic endeavor in the context of the pull toward community, by a member of the Universal House of Justice, who passed away the very day he dictated this essay. Includes preface by Michael Fitzgerald. [about]
    40. Gathering Traces: Selected Poems 1975-2002, by Jack McLean (2002). 95 poems written during phases of life including marriage and child-rearing in Quebec, a teaching career, separation and divorce, a stay on an island in British Columbia, and early retirement. [about]
    41. Hayden, Robert, by Christopher Buck and Derik Smith, in Oxford Research Encyclopedia, Literature (2019). In his poetics of history and his nuanced representations of black life, Hayden's art showed that the African American experience was quintessentially American, and that blackness was an essential aspect of heterogeneous America. [about]
    42. Hidden Meanings in the Poetry of Robert Hayden, by Duane L. Herrmann (2012). The Bahá'í Faith influenced Hayden's work on multiple levels, beyond his obvious allusions to the Bahá'í teachings regarding brotherhood of races or acceptance of religions. [about]
    43. Hidden Words, by Bahá'u'lláh (1985). Bahá'u'lláh's review of the most important themes of prior scriptures and religions, written in 1858 in the style of Persian mystical poetry. [about]
    44. Hymn to Love (Sáqí, bi-dih ábí), A, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 16 (2015). A ghazal, a mystical song of love about The Beloved, meaning God or a Manifestation. One of eight Persian poems Bahá'u'lláh signed "Dervish" and revealed in Kurdistan, circa 1854-1856. [about]
    45. I am all the Prophets": The Poetics of Pluralism in Bahá'í Texts, by Juan Cole, in Poetics Today, 14:3 (1993). Literary analysis of a passage from Tablet of Blood (Súriy-i-Damm) in which Bahá'u'lláh identifies Himself with all the past Prophets and their sufferings, depicting himself mortally wounded on the field of battle, like Imám Husayn. [about]
    46. Ichnographical: 173, by Duane L. Herrmann (2016). Poems of life, experience, and transcendence. Sample of poetry from the published book, selected by the author, for sharing with the Bahá'í Library. [about]
    47. Impressions from the Rock of Gibraltar: The Journal of a Travelling Teacher, by Jack McLean (2010). Book-length compilation of essays and poetry, written while travel-teaching in Spain and Morocco, August - December 2009. [about]
    48. Indexes to Bahá'í World volumes: Obituaries, chronologies, contents, illustrations, in Bahá'í World (2013). Seven separate indexes for Bahá'í World, in PDF, Word, and Excel versions. [about]
    49. Inebriation of His Enrapturing Call (mast-and bulbulán), The, by Julio Savi, in Lights of Irfan, 15 (2014). Translation of the early mystical Tablet "Nightingales Are Inebriated" and an analysis of its themes of ecstasy, Mount Sinai, eschatology, dhikr, sama, and fana`. [about]
    50. Ineffability in Scripture: A Conversation with 6 Medieval Mystics, by Ismael Velasco (2006). On how the experience of six 13th- and 14th-century Christian mystics was shaped by their language, environment, and background; how that process illuminates Baha’i scripture; implications for the conduct and direction of Baha’i scholarship. [about]
    51. Iqbál and the Bábí-Bahá'í Faith, by Annemarie Schimmel, in The Bahá'í Faith and Islam (1990). One of the more influential Muslim thinkers of the first half of the 20th century, Iqbal expressed views on the the Bábí and Bahá'í religions in his dissertation "The Development of Metaphysics in Persia" and his poetical magnum opus the Javidnama. [about]
    52. Journey of Broken Hearts, by Chris Jones Kavelin (2005). Three poems on meeting or loving the Beloved, and one inspired by the music of Henryk Górecki. [about]
    53. Kitáb-i-Aqdas (Most Holy Book): Notes on the Style of the Kitáb-i-Aqdas, by Suheil Badi Bushrui (1995). The near-similarity between the style of the Qur'an and that of the Aqdas. [about]
    54. Letters inscribed upon His sacred scroll: An anthology of poetry by Australian Bahá'ís 1999, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). A collection of 16 poems. [about]
    55. Life and Poetry of Robert Hayden, The: A Baha'i Perspective, by Ann Boyles (2004). [about]
    56. List of Articles on BahaiTeachings.org, by Christopher Buck (2014). List of online essays and articles by Christopher Buck. [about]
    57. Literature of Persia, The: A Lecture delivered to the Persia Society, by E. G. Browne (1912). A selection of Persian poetry, featuring poems by Nabil, Tahirih, and Bábí martyrs. [about]
    58. Long, Withdrawing Roar, The: The Crisis of Faith and Nineteenth-Century English Poetry, by Edwin McCloughan, in Solas, 2 (2002). A Bahá'í response to the argument that the crisis of faith in the late 19th century was conditioned by historical circumstances and has therefore little relevance for a contemporary reader. [about]
    59. Maid of Heaven, The: A Personal Compilation, by Báb, The and Bahá'u'lláh (2020). Compilation of texts related to the Maid of Heaven, a personification of the “Most Great Spirit." [about]
    60. Mathnaví by Rúhu'lláh Varqá, the Martyr, The: A Few Notes on Its Historical Context and Poetical Content, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 19 (2018). On the motifs of the cup-bearer and the cup, springtime, and love. Includes translation of "The Mathnaví of Rúhu'lláh, the Martyr." [about]
    61. Mathnaviyí-i Mubárak, by Bahá'u'lláh, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). [about]
    62. Mission of Bahá'u'lláh, The: And Other Literary Pieces, by George Townshend (1952). Poems, meditations, and essays, including "Nabíl’s history of the Báb," "Abdu’l-Bahá: A study of a Christlike character," "Queen Marie of Rumania and the Bahá’í Faith," "The wellspring of happiness," and "The genius of Ireland." [about]
    63. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Bahá'u'lláh in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
    64. Mystical Dimensions of Islam, by Annemarie Schimmel (1975). Detailed history of Sufism and its thought, Islamic theosophy, and Persian and Turkish mystical poetry. Book includes no mention of the Bahá'í Faith, but is quite relevant. [about]
    65. Ná'ím: A Bahá'í Poet, by Roy P. Mottahedeh, in World Order (1967). Biography of and selection of poems by a Persian Bahá'í in the time of Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    66. Nayriz Heroes: 22 Biographies of Bábís and Bahá'ís from Nayriz, Calligraphy of Ahmad Nayrizi, and Poetry of Vafá, by Hussein Ahdieh (2013). Bios of Muhammad Shafi, Nayrizi Vahidi, Abu Turab, Imam Jumih Shirazi, Ahmad Khoshnevis Nayrizi, Muhammad Nayrizi, Pari Jan Khanum, Shaykh Bahá'í, Jalal Misaghi, Rooha Ahdieh Misaghi, Muhammad Husayn, Shafi Rouhani, Ja'fari Yazdi, Ibrahim Khoshnevis, etc. [about]
    67. Nazif, Suleyman, by Necati Alkan, in Encyclopaedia Iranica (2021). Brief excerpt, with link to article offsite. [about]
    68. New Horizons for the Child, by Stanwood Cobb (1934). Understanding the child; character training; home life; the child as an individual; limitations of activity education; children as creative and active beings; romanticism vs. classicism; builders of civilization. Includes 20 pages of childrens' poetry. [about]
    69. Night Songs and New Seeds, by Michael Fitzgerald: Review, by Larry Rowdon, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 5:3 (1993). [about]
    70. No Known Address, by Duane L. Herrmann (2020). Nine poems selected by the author, from a collection of Holocaust poetry. [about]
    71. Notes on Persian Love Poems, by Marzieh Gail, in World Order (1968). A short history of Persian poetry. Includes a selection of poems by Hafiz, Rumi, Ali-Kuli Khan, and others, many related to the Bahá'í Faith or quoted by Bahá'u'lláh or Abdu'l-Bahá, and one written for Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    72. "Notes Postmarked The Mountain of God," by Roger White: Review, by Larry Rowdon, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 8:1 (1997). [about]
    73. Occasions of Grace, by Roger White: Review, by Alex Aronson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:3 (1991). [about]
    74. Ode of the Dove, by Bahá'u'lláh (1997). Translation of Qasídiy-i- Varqá'íyyih. [about]
    75. One Bird, One Cage, One Flight: Homage to Emily Dickinson, by Roger White (1983). In over 100 poems, inspired by themes and images from Dickinson's letters and poetry, White narrates her life from age 14 until her death in 1886, salutes her wit, and pays tribute to her person. [about]
    76. Path of Beauty, The: The Literary Life of Amatu'l-Bahá Rúhíyyih Khánum, by Sandra Lynn Hutchison, in World Order, 31:2 (1999). An extensive review of the varied literary works of Ruhiyyih Khanum – poems, plays, ethical guidance, practical guidelines for Baha’i pioneering and teaching, inspirational essays, literary and scriptural commentary, biography, and even a film script. [about]
    77. Pattern of Dust, A: Selected Poems 1965-1990, by Timothy Wangusa: Reviews, by Peter Nazareth, in World Literature Today, 70 (1996). [about]
    78. Perfection and Refinement: Towards an Aesthetics of the Bab, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). The writings of the Bab have implications for the "plastic" arts; significance for native traditions; relevance to the performing arts; and the concept of refinement which comes across in both the person and the writings of the Báb. [about]
    79. Persian Bahá'í Poets and Poetry: A General Overview, by Heshmat Moayyad (2008). [about]
    80. Pioneering Over Four Epochs: The Heroic Age: The First Epoch: 1844-1853: Section VII Poetry, by Ron Price, in Pioneering Over Four Epochs: An Autobiographical Study and a Study in Autobiography (2007). Autobiographical musings, unedited, as uploaded by the author. [about]
    81. Place of Poetry in Religion and Society, The: An Interview of Robert E. Hayden with Douglas Ruhe, by Robert E. Hayden and Douglas Ruhe, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). Introduction by Hatcher to the life of Hayden (2014); transcript of a talk between Hayden and Douglas Ruhe in 1975 on the future of poetry, transcendence, American destiny, important American poets, the Library of Congress, and Bahá'í spirituality. [about]
    82. Poems, by Leslie Garrett (2016). [about]
    83. Poems from a Misty Island, by Jack McLean (1997). Poetry written while on a two-year stay on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. [about]
    84. Poems Often Enrich My Spirit, by Betty Eskuche (2005). A collection of a dozen poems and the Bahá'í quotes that inspired them. [about]
    85. Poetry and Self-Transformation, by Roger White, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Poetry is no longer very accessible to the average reader or widely read; serious poets are often in conflict with their times; the Bahá'í Writings provide a foundation for poetic expression and a renewed spiritual aesthetics. [about]
    86. Poetry and the Arts in Rebuilding Society, by Duane L. Herrmann, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). The status of poetry is exalted in the Bahá’í Revelation, starting from the writings of the Bab to the hymns of the contemporary community; even God is described as a poet. The arts allow us to arise to our divine nature. [about]
    87. Poetry and Transformation, by Peter E. Murphy, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). A personal story of how the evolving attraction to and love of poetry transformed the author's life. Poetry, faith, and the revealed Word can have a dramatic effect on one's struggle for personal transformation in the midst of crisis and turmoil. [about]
    88. Poetry as Revelation: Introduction to Bahá'u'lláh's 'Mathnavíy-i Mubárak', by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). On Bahá'u'lláh and the poetic tradition, Sufism, Sufi poetry, and Rumi; rhetorical orientation; date of the poem and history of the text; and interpretation and the translation process. Includes a provisional translation. [about]
    89. Poetry from dialogue magazine, by Gretchen Sousa and L. B. Chase, in dialogue magazine (1986). Nine poems by six authors, published in various volumes of Dialogue. [about]
    90. Poetry in 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Writings and Utterances, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Abdu’l-Bahá mentions at least seven aspects of poetry: inspiration, beauty, eloquence, versified language, novelty, expressivity, depth, and loftiness. He also sets forth clear concepts on the purposes of poetry, which benefit any aspiring poet. [about]
    91. Poets, Guidance to, by Universal House of Justice (1988). Guidance on the responsibilities of poets; includes an overview of Tablets addressed to poets. [about]
    92. Prairies of Possibilities, by Duane L. Herrmann (2005). Sample of poems from the published book, selected by the author — whom Midwest Quarterly celebrated as "one of the most recognized poets in Kansas" — for sharing with the Bahá'í Library, [about]
    93. Praise the King of Glory: New and Selected Poems, by Duane L. Herrmann (2017). 9 poems, selected by the author, from a collection published to celebrate the bicentennial of the birth of Bahá’u’lláh. Many of the poems refer to events in the life of Bahá’u’lláh. [about]
    94. Prayers of Bahá'u'lláh, The, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 9 (1940–1944) (1945). Essay about various prayers and meditations of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    95. Purpose of Poetry, The, by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:1 (1988). Justifications for the work of contemporary artists; now is the time for Bahá’ís to work towards the flowering of civilization, using art as a unifying force to create links of understanding; poetry provides a means of approaching spiritual reality. [about]
    96. "Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by David L. Erickson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    97. Racial Identity and the Patterns of Consolation in the Poetry of Robert Hayden, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:2 (1990). The dramatic tension in Robert Hayden’s poetry has often been mistaken for personal ambivalence and confusion with regard to both his ethnic identity and his beliefs as a Bahá’í — rather than the clear pattern of consolation that unites them. [about]
    98. Reflections on the Art of My Poetry: An Interview of Roger White (1929-1993), in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). A glimpse into the mind of a gifted poet and the struggles that he, like many Bahá'í artists, encountered in responding to Bahá'u'lláh's exhortation that art best serves humanity when it elevates and edifies the soul and its spiritual receptivity. [about]
    99. Remnants of a Life, by Duane L. Herrmann (2019). Poems that reflect on a childhood that was survived in spite of events and conditions; a message of hope for others that survival is worth the effort and more than mere survival is possible. [about]
    100. Remoteness: Selected Poems, by Julio Savi (2002). A lengthy collection of poems, some originally written in Italian and translated to English by the author. [about]
    101. Reunion with the Beloved: Poetry and Martyrdom (2004). Poetry by or in honor of early Bábí and Bahá'í martyrs. Includes foreword by Hushmand Fatheazam, and discussion of the concept of martyrdom, cultural issues, and history of persecutions. [about]
    102. Rhapsody, God's Whimsy, and Planet Dreams, by Michael Fitzgerald: Reviews, by Ann Boyles, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:3 (1991). [about]
    103. Robert Hayden, by Christopher Buck, in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature, Vol. 2, ed. Jay Parini (2004). The first African American poet-laureate of the United States (as Library of Congress "Consultant in Poetry"). [about]
    104. Robert Hayden's 'American Journal': A Multidimensional Analysis, by Christopher Buck, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2 (2008). A study of an often neglected poem which combines an informal cultural analysis of the USA with a social commentary on the world. It treats the human race from a universal perspective, emphasizing the importance of human solidarity. [about]
    105. Robert Hayden's Epic of Community, by Benjamin Friedlander, in Melus (1998). A study of Hayden's poetry in the context of the American experience. [about]
    106. Roger White: An Obituary: Writer and editor, "poet laureate" of the Bahá'í community (1929-1993), by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 7 (1997). Brief biography, written as an obituary, of a famous Bahá'í poet. [about]
    107. Sacred Mythology and the Bahá'í Faith, by William P. Collins, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:4 (1990). The mythological universe created by Bahá’u’lláh employs three significant spiritual verities: the unknowable nature of the Ultimate Mystery, the relativity of religious/mythological truth, and the necessity of science and investigation of reality. [about]
    108. Selected Poems by Qurratu'l-`Ayn, Nabil, and other Babis, by Tahirih Qurratu'l-Ayn and Nabil-i-A'zam, in Materials for the Study of the Babi Religion (1918). [about]
    109. Settling the Score With Mr. Ogden Nash for the Seven Spiritual Ages of Mrs. Marmaduke Moore and Thereby Achieving if Not a Better Verse at Least a Longer Title, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season (1979). A dialogue for two readers, adapted from a poem. [about]
    110. Seven Valleys and Four Valleys: Interlinear Translation Comparison, by Bahá'u'lláh (2019). New 2019 translation, side-by-side with the 1945 translation and the Persian original. [about]
    111. Seven Valleys of Baha'u'llah: A Meditation, by George Townshend, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 7 (1936-1938) (1938). [about]
    112. Shedding Light in the Hearts: Reflections on Poetry, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 11:1-2 (2001). Limitations and merits of poetry as an emotional stimulus, as truth, and as a privileged form of linguistic expression, and its purpose as a spiritual conception of the nature of reality. [about]
    113. Short Poem by "Darvísh" Muhammad, Bahá'u'lláh: Sáqí az ghayb-i baqá burqa' bar afkan az 'idhár, A: An Introduction and Three Versions of Provisional English Translations, by Frank Lewis, in Lights of Irfan, Book 2 (2001). Three alternative renderings of a translation of one of Baha’u’llah’s early poems, writing during his sojourn in Kurdistan; comments on his poetic work. [about]
    114. Silences of God, The: A Meditation, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). While the Word of God dominated the history of religion, contemporaries question the orthodoxy of language. God's Silence is also essential in shaping our individual choices and collective histories, and understanding Bahá'u'lláh's words. [about]
    115. Solace of the Heart: selected poems, by Peter Mputle (2015). 30 contemporary poems on spirituality, inspired by the Seven Valleys and "troubles of the affairs of mortal nature." [about]
    116. Some Themes and Images in the Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Bahá'í World, Volume 16 (1973-1976) (1976). Exploring the relationship between the Creative Word, particularly its expression in language, and the journey of the human soul to its Creator. [about]
    117. Song Celestial, The, by Howard Colby Ives (1938). Book-length poem about the search for God, in which a seeker asks God various questions, and God responds. [about]
    118. Songs of the Spirit: A Collection of Poems Written during the Fast 2003 and 2004, by Dawn Staudt, in Solas, 4 (2004). [about]
    119. Sweet Scented Dreams: Poems for Devotion, by Duane L. Herrmann (2011). Selection of twelve poems of a devotional nature from a Bahá'í perspective, some previously published individually. [about]
    120. Tablet of Nightingale of Separation, by Bahá'u'lláh (1998). [about]
    121. Tablet of the Centennial, by Shoghi Effendi (1998). An epistle to the Persian-speaking Bahá'ís. Includes English translation of Muhammad Varqa's "Le Style persan du Gardien." [about]
    122. Tablet of the Holy Mariner, by Bahá'u'lláh (n.d.). Complete tablet, both the Arabic (official translation) and the Persian (provisional translation) sections. [about]
    123. Tablet on the Daystar of Divine Beauty, by Bahá'u'lláh (2003). Poetic Tablet of Bahá’u’lláh dating from the Baghdád, Istanbul, or Edirne periods. [about]
    124. Tablet to Mullá Muhammad Báqir-i Tabrízí: Extracts, by Báb, The (1998). Extract from a Tablet of the Bab to the 13th Letter of the Living, in reply to his question about Man yuzhiruhu'lláh, "He Whom God will make Manifest." [about]
    125. Tafsir and the Meaning of the Qur'an: The Crucifixion in Muslim Thought, by Todd Lawson (2010). Using Qur'án 4:156-7 as an example, classical tafsīr, “scholastic" exegesis, has not always taken account of the way all Muslims understand the Quranic text. Other understandings may be found in poetry, philosophy, mysticism and even historical writing. [about]
    126. Táhirih: A Portrait in Poetry, by Amin Banani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 10:1-2 (2000). An account of Tahirih allowing her own voice, through her poems, to speak for herself, her time, and her motivations; it is her poetry that both reveals the layers of her complex motivations and makes her accessible. [about]
    127. Tahirih: A Theology in Poetry, by Anthony Lee (2016). Examination of Qurratu’l-Ayn's writings to discern her social, religious, and political beliefs, most of which broke with Islam's traditional theology in favor of a revolutionary new doctrine. [about]
    128. "The Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by Jack McLean, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    129. The Quickening: Unknown Poetry of Tahirih, by John S. Hatcher and Amrollah Hemmat: Review, by Shahbaz Fatheazam, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:3 (2015). [about]
    130. This is Faith, by Ruhiyyih (Mary Maxwell) Khanum (1954). One poem. [about]
    131. Translation list (2009). Index to talks, letters, and other items translated from Persian and Arabic to English by Adib Masumian; listed here for the sake of search engines and tagging. [about]
    132. Two poems: "A Portrait of Time" and "Surrender", by Vahid Chittleborough, in The Family: Our Hopes and Challenges (1995). [about]
    133. Two Poems: Threnody, Mystery of Life, by Hugh McKinley, in Solas, 3 (2003). [about]
    134. Two Poems: The Muse, Don Quixote, by Sheila Banani, in Solas, 3 (2003). [about]
    135. Under the Divine Lote Tree: Essays and Reflections, by Jack McLean (1999). 85 literary and theological existential essays on topics such as poetry, scripture, philosophy, spirituality, love, detachment, mysticism, joy, death, and theology. [about]
    136. Unveiling the Hidden Words, by Diana Malouf: An Extended Review, by Frank Lewis, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Book review, and a commentary on the need for Bahá'í academia aimed at a secular audience, and the possibility of updating the Guardian's translations when English evolves in the future. [about]
    137. Verse, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Poems by Ruhiyyih Khanum, Giuseppe de Marco, Gilbert Robert, Martyn Burke, Audrey Marcus, Anneke Buys, Geoffrey Nash, Judith Partelow Provost, Adelbert Mühlschlegel, Larry Rowdon, Victor de Araujo, Shirin Sabri, Roger White, Bret Breneman, et al. [about]
    138. What Is God?, by Stanwood Cobb (1955). Poetic meditations on the nature of God and our search for the divine, "an attempt to open up vistas into the Infinite in a way that prose could not accomplish." [about]
    139. Whilst He Was in Suleymaniah: Extracts and poems from the memoirs of Nabil Zarandi, by Nabil-i-A'zam (2002). Handful of short extracts and poems from the memoirs of Nabíl-i-A`zam [aka Mullá Muḥammad-i-Zarandí, aka Nabíl-i-Zarandí]. on the conduct of the Bábís in 'Iráq during Bahá'u'lláh's self-imposed exile. From Nabil's unpublished narrative. [about]
    140. Whispers of Angels: Poems, by Jack McLean (1990). A collection of 89 poems dedicated to the author's father. [about]
    141. Wisdom and Wit of Roger White, The: Two Reviews, by Marzieh Gail and Hilda Phillips, in dialogue magazine, 1:4 (1987). Reviews of White's books One Bird One Cage One Flight and A Sudden Music. [about]
     
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