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from the chronology

date event locations tags see also
1901 2 Nov Birth of John Robarts, Hand of the Cause of God, in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Waterloo; Ontario; Canada John Robarts; Births and deaths
1903 May Russian poet Isabella Grinevskaya wrote the play "Báb" which was performed in St. Petersburg in 1904 and again in 1914 and once again in 1917. It was translated into French and Tatar (and later into German by Friedrich Fiedler) and lauded by Leo Tolstoy and other reviewers at the time. It is reported to have been Tolstoy's first knowledge of the Faith.
  • In 1910-11 she spent two weeks in Ramleh as a guest of `Abdu'l-Bahá and after she returned to Russia she had several letters and Tablets from Him.
  • Immediately upon her return from Egypt in January of 1911 she began work on the book "A Journey in the Countries of the Sun", an account of her visit with 'Abdu'l-Bahá. This work was not completed until 1914 because in the summer of 1912 she made a trip to Paris to work with the French translator of "Báb", Madame Halperin, and when she returned to Leningrad she began work on the drama entitled Bahá'u'lláh. It was published in Leningrad in 1912 but was never performed. "Journey", a book of some 550 pages did not get published because of the disruption cause by the advent of the war. See BW6p707-712 for the article "Russia's Cultural Contribution to the Bahá'i Faith" by Martha Root.
  • For a photo see BW6p709 or here.
  • Also see Notes on the Bábí and Bahá'í Religions in Russia and its territories by Graham Hassall.
  • Isabella Grinevskaya (the pen name of Beyle (Berta) Friedberg), born in Grodno in 1964, died in Istanbul in 1944. [Revolvy] In His message to Isabella Grinevskaya, ‘Abdu’l-Bahá praised her efforts to stage theatrical performances about the Báb and Bahá’u’lláh but cautioned her that people’s attention at that moment was focused on “war and revolution.” However, He added, “the time for staging it will come” and it will “have a considerable impact” in Europe.

    Ms. Grinevskaya’s play about the Báb was first staged in St. Petersburg in January 1904. Mr. Tolstoy read the play and wrote Ms. Grinevskaya to praise her and share his sympathy with the Baha'í teachings, according to an article by Martha Root in the 1934-1936 edition of The Bahá'í World.

  • St Petersburg; Ramleh (Alexandria); Alexandria; Egypt; Istanbul (Constantinople); Turkey; Grodno; Russia Isabella Grinevskaya; Leo Tolstoy; Publications; Drama; Plays; Arts
    1912 21 or 22 Dec 'Abdu'l-Bahá witnessed His first dramatic performance. It was a mystery Christmas play entitled Eager Heart written by Miss Alice Buckton and performed at the Church House, Westminster before an audience of 1,200. [SoW Vol III no 19 2March1913 p 7, CH154, AB34]
  • He is reported to have said, perhaps on another occasion, "The stage will be the pulpit of the future". [Quoted by Loulie Mathews in The Magazine of the Children of the Kingdom, Vol 4, No. 3 (June 1923, p69]
  • Star of the West, Vol. 19 no. 11 Feb1929, p.341 quotes 'Abdu'l-Bahá as saying: "drama is of the utmost importance. It has been a great educational power in the past; it will be so again,". [BW1994-1995p255]
  • Westminster; London; United Kingdom Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; Drama; Plays; Arts
    1913 8 Jan 'Abdu'l-Bahá was given a tour of the Edinburgh College of Arts conducted by the President. (74 Lauriston Place, Edinburgh EH3 9DF) This was followed by a tour of a school in the poorer district, North Canongate School.
  • In the afternoon He spoke to a capacity attendance at Rainy Hall, New College, the Mound, Edinburgh EH1 2LX.
  • 'Abdu'l-Bahá attended a charity performance of Handel's Messiah at St Giles Cathedral. (Royal Mile, Edinburgh EH1 1RE) St. Giles was also known as the High Kirk of Edinburgh. It was Edinburgh's religious focal point for at least 900 years.

    And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it. (Isaiah 40:5) [Ahmad Sohrab's Diary, Edinburgh, 1913, ABTM297, SCU85-100]

  • Edinburgh; Scotland; United Kingdom Abdul-Baha, Travels of; Abdul-Baha, Second Western tour; St Giles Cathedral; Handels Messiah; Edinburgh College of Arts; North Canongate School
    1938 1 May At the National Convention in Chicago, Grace Roberts Ober, who had just given a report on a travel teaching trip to Louisville Ky and on her work in Toronto where she had been the previous Fall, collapsed into the arms of the Convention chairman, Harlan Ober in view of the assembled delegates while ending her address. She was removed from the convention hall and passed away shortly thereafter. See TG75-76 and FMH273-274 for the background to this story.
  • Born in Thorold, ON of Sarah E. Wilson and the Rev Thomas Tempest Robarts, a cannon in the Anglican Church, Grace's life's work was that of a teacher.
  • During 'Abdu'l-Baha's tour of America she served as his household manager, going ahead to secure an apartment for him and acting as His housekeeper and hostess.
  • On July 17, 1912 she married Harlan Ober at 'Abdu'l-Bahá's suggestion. The legal marriage was conducted by Howard Colby Ives. [BW8p656-660]
  • Chicago; United States Grace Robarts Ober; In Memoriam
    1948 24 - 25 Apr The National Spiritual Assembly of the Dominion of Canada was established. [BBRSM:186; BW13:856; MBW143; PP397]
  • See BW11:160, 184 for pictures.
  • The first National Convention was held in the Maxwell's home (in 'Abdu'l-Bahá's home as will be the election of the Universal House of Justice some 15 years hence.) with 13/19 delegates from all the provinces attending. (Six were unable to attend due to a flood.) Those elected to the first National Spiritual Assembly were: Laura Davis, Rowland Estall, Lloyd Gardner, Doris Richardson, John Robarts, Emeric Sala, Rosemary Sala, Siegfried Schopflocher, and Ross Woodman. [TG110, OBCC269]
  • For a picture of the first Canadian National Spiritual Assembly see OBCC148.
  • Canada National Spiritual Assembly, formation; National Convention; Laura Davis; Rowland Estall; Lloyd Gardner; Doris Richardson; John Robarts; Emeric Sala; Rosemary Sala; Siegfried Schopflocher; Ross Woodman
    1950. 26 Mar - 10 Apr The British Community needed 22 declarations to complete the goals of their Six Year Plan. The National Spiritual Assembly of Canada sponsored a trip by John Robarts to lend his assistance. During his 13 day stay he visited London, Manchester, Blackpool, Blackburn, Sheffield, Oxford, Dublin, Belfast, Glasgow and Edinburgh and witnessed 18 declarations. By April 10th the goal had been won. [CBN No 13 May, 1950 p4] London; Manchester; Blackpool; Blackburn; Sheffield; Oxford; Dublin; Belfast; Glasgow; Edinburgh John Robarts
    1954 Jan John and Audrey Robarts with their two younger children, Patrick and Tina, left Toronto for their pioneer post in Mafeking (later Mafikeng), Buchuanaland (later Botswana and formerly Bophuthatswana). Older children Aldham and Gerald pioneered to Nigeria and a homefront post respectively. [LOF485-6; CBN No48 January 1954 p11]
  • Later the same year he was appointed to the newly established Auxiliary Board by Hand of the Cause of God Músá Banání. They returned to Canada some 13 years later. [LOF486, 491]
  • Canada; Botswana; Nigeria; Africa John Robarts
    1954 Feb John and Audrey Robarts and their son Patrick and young daughter Tina arrived in Mafikeng and were named Knights of Bahá’u’lláh for Bechuanaland (Botswana). [BW13:449] Mafikeng; Botswana John Robarts; Knights of Bahaullah
    1957 Oct The third contingent of Hands of the Cause of God was appointed: Enoch Olinga, William Sears, John Robarts, Hasan Balyuzi, John Ferraby, Collis Featherstone, Rahmatu’lláh Muhájir and Abu’l-Qásim Faizí. [GBF111; MBW127; PP254, 442; SS47]
  • See TG160 for the story of how Enoch Olinga reacted to the news of being appointed a Hand of the Cause of God.
  • Haifa Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Appointments; Hands of the Cause, Contingents; Hands of the Cause, Third Contingent; Enoch Olinga; William Sears; John Robarts; Hasan Balyuzi; John Ferraby; Collis Featherstone; Rahmatullah Muhajir; Abul-Qasim Faizi
    1960 12 Jul Horace Hotchkiss Holley, Hand of the Cause of God, passed away in Haifa. (b. 7 April, 1887 in Torrington, CT) [MC226-227, BW13:849]
  • See FMH58-59 for the story of how he came to believe in the Faith.
  • He had served on the National Spiritual Assembly of the United States from 1923 until 1959 and as the secretary from 1924 to 1930 and 1932 until 1959. After the passing of the Guardian he served in the Holy Land. [UN110; BN No 347 January 1960 p1]
  • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the first contingent on the 24th of December, 1951. [MoCxxiii]
  • For his obituary see BW13:849–858.
  • For cable from the Hands of the Cause see MC217–18.
  • See also SBR214-247, LoF253-264 and Holley, Horace Hotchkiss by R. Jackson Armstrong-Ingram.
      Some of his is publications: See BEL7.1197 to 7.1233]
    • The Bahá'í Religion: Papers Read at the Conference on Some Living Religions Within the British Empire Papers presented by Horace Holley and Ruhi Afnan. 1925 [BEL7.386]
    • Bahaism: The Modern Social Religion, (1913) [BEL7.1203]
    • Religion for Mankind, (1956) [BEL7.1222]
    • World Unity,
    • Bahá'í, The Spirit of the Age, (1921) [BEL7.1201]
    • Bahá'í Scriptures; Selections from the Utterances of Bahaʼuʼllah and Abdul Baha, (1923 and 1928) The first general book-length compilation of the writings of Bahá'u'lláh and 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Many passages were early and nonauthoritative translations. The book was superseded by Bahá'í World Faith [BEL4.71]
    • Read-aloud Plays,
    • Divinations and Creation,
    • The World Economy of Baháʼuʼlláh
    • The Inner Garden; A Book of Verse
    • The Reality of Man (1931) [BEL3.103]
    • He was a man of enormous capacity. When asked about it he referred to a "zone of energy" in which he sometimes operated when more than normal strength was available to him. [FMH58]
  • Haifa; Torrington; Connecticut; United States Horace Holley; Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Births and deaths; Births and deaths; In Memoriam; Hands of the Cause, First Contingent; Bahai Scriptures (book); Drama; Plays; Arts
    1962. 20 Jul The passing of Harlan Foster Ober (b. October 6, 1881 in Beverly, Massachusetts) in Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.
  • He had graduated from Harvard University in 1905 with a B.A. and later obtained a law degree from Northeastern University in Boston.
  • Harlan Ober became a Bahá'í at Green Acre in 1905. Another source said it was in the spring of 1906 in a room in the Commonwealth Hotel in Boston that he overcame his doubts while using a prayer and other literature given to him by Lua Getsinger. [LDNW23; 100-101; SBR120-121]
  • Hooper Harris and Lua Getsinger's brother, Dr. William Moore, were selected to make a teaching trip to India. When Moore died suddenly Harlan Ober was chosen to replace him. As he had no funds for the trip Lua borrowed the money from Mr Hervey Lunt, the father of Alfred Lunt. [LGHC105]
  • In 1906 he made a visit to 'Abdu'l-Bahá while He was still confined to prison.
  • On the 17th of July, 1912 he married Grace Roberts (aunt of future Hand of the Cause John Robarts) in a ceremony conducted by the Reverend Howard Colby Ives at 209 West 78th Street in New York. When ‘Abdu’l-Bahá visited America in 1912 He had suggested that Grace Robarts and Harlan marry, and they both agreed with the match, with Harlan travelling to New York from Boston and proposing in Central Park after being informed of the suggestion by Lua Getsinger. ‘Abdu’l-Bahá performed the marriage ceremony in the room he was staying in in New York on July 17, 1912, and Howard Colby Ives later performed a legal ceremony. [SoW Vol 3 No 12 p14; Bahaipedia; The Jouney West, July 2012; Mother’s Stories: Stories of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá and Early Believers told by Muriel Ives Barrow Newhall to her son, p. 20]
  • They adopted three children of English, German and Russian background.
  • It was from their home in Cambridge, MA, from the office of the National Teaching Committee, that the first Teaching Bulletin was issued on November 19, 1919. This bulletin evolved to the US Baha'i News.
  • He was closely involved with Race Unity work and made many teaching trips to the southern states with his friend Louis Gregory.
  • He served on the Bahá'í Temple Unity Executive Board as president or secretary from 1918 to 1920. The work of this board was taken over by the National Spiritual Assembly when it was elected in 1922.
  • In 1938 Harlan was elected to the National Spiritual Assembly of the United States and Canada and he served on it until 1941.
  • Grace passed away in 1938, leaving Harlan widowed.
  • He married his second wife, Dr Elizabeth Kidder Ober in Beverly, MA on the 21st of June, 1941. Shoghi Effendi was pleased with the way the marriage was conducted, without having any church ceremony or minister conduct the service. [BW13p869, 871]
  • After their pilgrimage in 1956 Harlan and Elizabeth Ober travelled to South Africa where they helped form the first all-African Local Spiritual Assembly in Pretoria as had previously been request of them by the Guardian. They returned in December as pioneers. [BW13869]
  • He was appointed to the Auxiliary Board for Protection in Africa in October of 1957 and served on the National Teaching Committee of South and West Africa for two years.
  • He was buried in the Zandfontein Cemetery in Pretoria. [BW13p870; Find a grave] [Bahaipedia; BW13p869]
  • Beverly MA; United States; Pretoria; South Africa Harlan Ober; Grace Robarts Ober; In Memoriam; US Baha'i News; Race Unity; Elizabeth Kidder Ober; Elizabeth Ober
    1966 12 Dec The Hand of the Cause John Robarts departed Africa from Cape Town after a stay of nearly 13 years. They were recalled from their pioneer post by the Universal House of Justice to help Canada win the goals of the Nine Year Plan. The objective was to raise 154 local assemblies by 1973 but the count had fallen from 68 to only 50, eighteen less than the number won during the Ten Year Plan and 104 short of the objective. [LNW158] Cape Town; South Africa; Canada John Robarts; Hands of the Cause
    1967. 24 - 26 Mar The Arctic Policy Conference was held in Toronto. Present were 16 attendees, Hand of the Cause John Robarts, representatives of the National Spiritual Assembly, the Auxiliary Board, the National Pioneer Committee and individuals involved in the teaching work in the Arctic. It was decided to establish Bahá'í houses in Frobisher Bay in the District of Franklin, Baker Lake in the District of Keewatin and Yellowknife in the District of Mackenzie. [SDSC278]
  • Photo of Bahá'í House in Baker Lake.
  • Toronto; Frobisher Bay; Baker Lake; Yellowknife; Canada John Robarts; Bahai centres
    1976 (In the year) Elizabeth Martin with Chris Lyons made a film called Retrospective, a memoir of Hand of the Cause John Robarts. It included his reminiscences of the Guardian and of the early days of the Faith in Canada. [HNWE36] Toronto; Canada Film; Elizabeth Martin; Chris Lyons; John Robarts; Hands of the Cause
    1976 24 Apr The passing of Mark George Tobey (b. December 11, 1890 Centerville, Wisconsin – d. April 24, 1976 Basel, Switzerland) [Bahá'í News page 341, Wiki, VV119]
  • He had been introduced to the Faith by Bernard Leach. [OPOP223]
  • Another version is that In 1918 Mark Tobey came in contact with Juliet Thompson and posed for her. During the session Tobey read some Bahá'í literature and accepted an invitation to Green Acre where he converted. [Seitz, William Chapin (1980). Mark Tobey. Ayer Publishing. p. 44]
  • Tobey was one of the twentieth century’s most cosmopolitan of artists. An inveterate traveler—he eventually settled in Basel, Switzerland—he was always better known in Europe than in his homeland.
  • His mature ‘white writing’ works are made up of pulsing webs of lines inspired by oriental calligraphy, explicitly acknowledged the direct influence of the Bahá'í Faith on his painting. It has been said that Tobey “made line the symbol of spiritual illumination, human communication and migration, natural form and process, and movement between levels of consciousness.” He often stated, “that there can be no break between nature, art, science, religion, and personal life".
  • See Bahá'í World 1994-95 pg248 for an article by Anne Boyles entitled "The Language of the Heart: Arts in the Bahá'í World Community" for mention of Mark Tobey.
  • For his obituary see BW17:401–4.
  • Towards the end of his life, Tobey was the recipient of some of the highest distinctions that the European art scene of his time could bestow. He won the gold medal at the Venice Biennale in 1958—the first American painter to do so since 1895. In 1961, a major retrospective of his work was held at the Louvre in Paris, an unprecedented achievement for a living and American artist.
  • See The Journal of Bahá'í Studies, Volume 26, number 4 – Winter 2016 p94 for an article by Anne Gordon Perry entitled Anne Gould Hauberg and Mark Tobey: Lives Lived for Art, Cultivated by Spirit.
  • An exhibition, Mark Tobey: Threading Light showed at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, 6 May to 10 September 2017 and at the Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, 4 November 2017–11 March 2018.
  • An example of some of his works.
  • See World Order Vol 11 No 3 Spring 1977 for the following articles:
    • The Days with Mark Tobey by Marzieh Gail
    • Mark, Dear Mark by Bernard Leach
    • Memories of Mark Tobey by Firuz Kazemzahed
    • The Dot and the Circle by Mark Tobey
  • Centerville; Wisconsin; United States; Basel; Switzerland In Memoriam; Mark Tobey; Bernard Leach; Anne Gould Hauberg; Arts; Painting
    1986 (In the year) The Bahá’í Association for Arts (BAFA) was formed with its base in the Netherlands. Netherlands Bahai Association for Arts (BAFA); Bahai associations; Arts
    1987 (Autumn) The Post Office of the United Kingdom issued a commemorative stamp honouring Bernard Leach, Bahá’í and world-renowned potter. [BINS173:8] United Kingdom Bernard Leach; Stamps; Artists; Arts
    1988 (In the year) ‘Arts for Nature’, a fund-raising programme held to benefit the work of the World Wide Fund for Nature, was held in London with the collaboration of the Bahá’í International Community. [AWH61; VV106] London; United Kingdom Bahai International Community; Arts; Nature; World Wide Fund for Nature; Environment
    1988 30 Jun - 3 Jul The Bahá’í Arts Council, Canada, held the first arts festival, ‘Invitation 88: A Festival of the Human Spirit’ at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario. [BINS179:2] London; Ontario; Canada Arts; Firsts, Other
    1988 14 – 17 Jul The Bahá’í Association for Arts (BAFA) helds its first arts festival at the Bahá’í conference centre De Poort, Netherlands. [BINS180:4] Groesbeek; Netherlands Bahai Association for Arts (BAFA); Conferences, Bahai; Conferences, Arts; First conferences; De Poort
    1989 (In the year) Three International Music Festivals were held in Africa. [BINS215] Africa Festivals, Music; Music; Arts
    1991 18 Jun The passing of Hand of the Cause of God, Knight of Bahá'u'lláh, John Aldham Robarts at Rawdon, Quebec. He was born in Waterloo, Ontario 2nd of November, 1901. [VV124]
  • Shoghi Effendi had appointed him among the third contingent on the 2nd of October, 1957. [MoCxxiii]
  • See BW20p801-809.
  • For his obituary see BINS250:10.
  • For picture see VV124.
  • For the story of how he came to learn of the Faith see SBR137.
  • See LoF473-495.
  • A 50-minute film entitledRetrospective, a Ciné Bahá’í production, was made as a tribute to the Hand of the Cause John A. Robarts on the occasion of his 40th anniversary as a member of the Bahá‘r' community.
  • Rawdon; Quebec Hands of the Cause; Hands of the Cause, Births and deaths; Births and deaths; Knights of Bahaullah; John Robarts; In Memoriam; Births and deaths
    2000 22 Aug The passing of Knight of Bahá'u'lláh Audrey Robarts (née FitzGerald) in her 96th year. She was buried with her husband, Hand of the Cause of God John Robarts, in the Ecumenical Cemetery in Rawdon. He had predeceased her on the 18th of June, 1991. [BW00-01p272]
  • After the passing of her husband she travelled to four countries in southern Africa in response to a request from the National Spiritual Assembly of Botswana where she was known as the "beloved mother of our country".
  • Rawdon; Quebec; Canada Audrey Robarts; Knights of Bahaullah; Births and deaths; In Memoriam
    2002 26 Jun – 2 Jul In commemoration of the Second Bahá'í World Congress 23-26 November in 1992 in New York, a Festival of the Arts was celebrated in that same city. The project was an independent initiative of Global Music, Inc., a Bahá'í-owned company, and associated individuals. It was not under the sponsorship of any Bahá'í institution. The centerpiece event was held at Carnegie Hall featuring a 550-voice choir under the direction of Mr. Tom Price and known as the "Voices of Baha". It was composed of Bahá'ís from some 24 countries. [BWNS162] New York; United States World Congresses; Arts; Music; Carnegie Hall; Tom Price; Choirs; BWNS
    2015 6 Nov The première of Mercy's Blessing, a film by May Taherzadeh in Lilongwe, Malawi. To date it has won 12 film awards and has been distributed for use in 115 countries. [Official Web Site]
  • See the trailer.
  • The film can be purchased on Vimeo.
  • See her Ted Talk entitled The Power of Film to Inspire Social Change and her foundation Inspire Courage for Change.
  • Lilongwe; Malawi Mercys Blessing; Film; Documentaries; Arts; Awards; May Taherzadeh; Inspire Courage for Change Foundation; Ted Talk
    2018. 8 Jul The opening of the play about Tahirih called Daughter of the Sun to an audience of 450 people at the Azerbaijan State Academic National Drama. The dramatic presentation was produced by journalist Kamale Selim Muslimgizi and came at a time when the life of Tahirih was gaining renewed attention and interest in Azerbaijani society due, in part because a book on Tahirih’s life and works that were translated and published in 2016 which catalyzed a growing interest among the people of Azerbaijan about the life of this iconic champion of women’s emancipation.
  • Tahirih wrote in Persian, Arabic, and Azeri, a widely spoken language in Qazvin and the surrounding region. Azeri is also the main language of Azerbaijan. Tahirih has long attracted interest among scholars. Western Orientalists of the 19th century wrote of her influence on literature and gender equality. In recent years, there have been numerous academic articles and books about her as well as translations of three volumes of her poetry into English.
  • The play continued its run in Baku and in the following months on stage in other cities across the country. [BWNS1276; 30 April, 1960]
  • Baku; Azerbaijan Tahirih; Drama; Plays; Arts; Kamale Selim Muslimgizi; BWNS
    2020 The paintings of Maryam Safajoo depict the many forms of persecution faced by the Bahá'ís of Iran. She has exhibited her work at venues including Harvard University, the Massachusetts State House and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. She has been interviewed by Voice of America, BBC, Radio Farda, Iran Wire, Iran Press Watch, the Centre for Human Rights in Iran, Iran Human Rights Documentation Centre and Persian Bahá'í Media Services about this current persecution. Boston Herald wrote an article about her life. She currently lives in Champaign, Illnois.
  • See her story in Iranwatch.
  • Champaign; Illinois; United States Persecution, Iran; Arts

    from the chronology of Canada

    from the main catalogue

    1. 'Abdu'l-Bahá and Ezra Pound's Circle, by Elham Afnan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 6:2 (1994). On the 1911 meeting between Ezra Pound, the famous American modernist poet, and 'Abdu'l-Bahá; links between the Bahá'í Faith and a number of important avant-garde circles in the West. [about]
    2. Active Force and That Which Is Its Recipient, The: A Bahá'í View of Creativity, by Rick Johnson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 27:4 (2017). On creativity and the pervasive nature of this concept in Bahá’í thought. The universe is coded to be creative; it exists in a perpetually generative, dynamic state and that creativity is the fundamental reality of the universe. [about]
    3. Additional Tablets, Extracts and Talks, by Abdu'l-Bahá (2018). 57 selections, updated 2019. [about]
    4. Africanity, Womanism, and Constructive Resilience: Some Reflections, by Layli Maparyan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 30:3 (2020). The meanings of the metaphor "pupil of the eye;" experiences of growing up African-American in the West; overcoming cosmological negation; the African worldview on nature, humanity, and creation; gendered expressions of African culture. [about]
    5. Age of Anxiety and the Century of Light, The: Twentieth-Century Literature, the Poet's Mission, and the Vision of World Unity , by Suheil Badi Bushrui, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 13:1-4 (2003). W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, and Kahlil Gibran were writers who recognized and confronted the spiritual and intellectual crisis of their time. The mission of the poet is to bear witness, maintain the integrity of language, and express truths. [about]
    6. Alain Locke materials: index to some documents online (2010). List of the various documents at the Bahá'í Library Online by or about Alain Locke, an American writer, philosopher, educator, and patron of the arts who received a Tablet from Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    7. Anecdote of the Jar, The, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 27:4 (2017). "From the Editor's Desk": Discussion of a piece of pottery by Bernard Leach; overview of the articles and poems in this issue of the Journal. [about]
    8. Anne Gordon Perry on Writing for Film, by Sandra Lynn Hutchison, in elixir-journal.org, vol. 12 (2021). Interview with the co-creator of Luminous Journey, a film documenting ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s travels in North America. [about]
    9. Anne Gould Hauberg and Mark Tobey: Lives Lived for Art, Cultivated by Spirit, by Anne Gordon Perry, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:4 (2016). On the friendship and working relationship between Seattle art patron Hauberg and Seattle-based painter Tobey. [about]
    10. Art and Architecture: A Bahá'í Perspective, by Fariborz Sahba, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 7:3 (1997). This essay explores the spiritual significance of the relationship between traditional and new forms of artistic expression from the author’s experience as an architect. [about]
    11. Art and the Interconnectedness of All Things, by Todd Lawson, in UK Bahá'í, 30 (2020). Art as a mode of divine revelation in the Wrings and Calligraphy of the Báb. [about]
    12. Arte, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (n.d.). Spanish translation of English "Compilation on the Arts." [about]
    13. Artist and the Grammarian, The, by Otto Donald Rogers, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 19:1-4 (2009). On the process and meaning of creating art; its effect on the mind and the brain, the nature of painting; spiritual foundations of the natural world. [about]
    14. Artist Biographies from Arts Dialogue (2001). A list of artist profiles which can be found in the Bahá'í Association for the Arts newsletter (offsite). Linked articles include poetry, photography, and samples of visual art. [about]
    15. Artist, Seeker and Seer: A vocabulary and a perspective for the appreciation and creation of art inspired by the Bahá'í Writings, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani, in Bahá'í Studies, 10 (1982). Imagery and metaphors from the Bahá'í Writings guide the appreciation and creation of art. They demonstrate that criticism vs creativity, logic vs. passion, and historicity vs. poetry have already been brought to a state of unity. [about]
    16. Arts: Compilation from other compilations, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (n.d.). [about]
    17. Arts and Architecture, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Shoghi Effendi (n.d.). [about]
    18. Arts and Crafts, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 1 (1991). [about]
    19. Arts, Importance of in Promoting the Faith, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 3 (2000). [about]
    20. Australian Bahá'í Studies: Vol. 2 (2000). The complete issue of volume 2. Some papers were delivered at the 18th annual ABS conference "The Creative Inspiration: Arts and Culture in the Bahá’í Faith" (Melbourne, September 1999). [about]
    21. Author's Response to Commentaries on "The Purpose of Poetry", by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
    22. Bahá'í Art: Fact or Fiction?, by Inder Manocha, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 3:1 (1993). A re-examination of the nature of Bahá'í art. Includes response by Sonja van Kerkhoff. [about]
    23. Baha'i Association for the Arts (-). Biographies of, essays about, and artwork by contemporary Bahá'í artists. [about]
    24. Bahá'u'lláh's Influence on the New York School of Painting: The "Unapprehended Inspiration" of Newman and Rothko, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:1 (1991). The paintings of New Yorkers Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko may best be understood as a powerful first evidence of what Bahá’u’lláh called “the rising Orb of Divine Revelation, from behind the veil of concealment.” [about]
    25. Beautiful Flight toward the Light, The: Reflections on an Artist's Life, by Robin M. Chandler, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). Subjective reflections about the nature of creativity from the author's own point of view, training and experiences as a social scientist and as an artist. [about]
    26. Bernard Leach, Potter: A Biographical Sketch, by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). The life and work of the potter Leach (1887–1979), the 'Father of British studio pottery', and a Bahá'í. [about]
    27. Building Creative Communities: Approaching the arts as social & economic development through professionalizing, training, and networking internationally, by Robin M. Chandler, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). On the Global Arts Training Institute, a model for building professionalism in the arts which can be implemented in Bahá’í communities and incorporated into teaching plans to develop the next generation of artists. [about]
    28. Bushido (Chivalry) and the Traditional Japanese Moral Education, by Nozomu Sonda, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1 (2007). Japanese virtues explained by Nitobe in 1900 in comparison with the Bahá'í perspective on moral education. [about]
    29. Calligraphy of Mishkin-Qalam, The, by Julie Badiee and Heshmatollah Badiee, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:4 (1991). The life and work of a one-time court artist for Nasiri'd-Din Shah, who was present for the nascent years of the Baha’i revelation and moved to Edirne to be near to Baha'u'lláh; examples of Islamic calligraphic traditions and his own compositions. [about]
    30. Collected Poems of Robert Hayden, by Robert Hayden: Review, by Harryette Mullen, in The Antioch Review, 53 (1997). [about]
    31. Coming Out, by Ian Kluge (2001). Short, humorous play depicting the confusions that can result from trying to be too delicate in announcing one's commitment to the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    32. Concepts of Spirituality in The Works of Robert Houle and Otto Rogers with Special Consideration to Images of the Land , by Nooshfar B. Afnan (2000). The attitude of native Canadians toward the land and the prairies, as expressed through the work of two artists, their spiritual iconography, and Bahá'í teachings regarding nature. [about]
    33. Considerations in Setting Sacred Text to Music for the Mashriqu'l-Adhkar, by R. Jackson Armstrong-Ingram, in Arts Dialogue (1996). The relationship of music to the Mashriqu'l-Adhkar as a place and as a gathering of people, and a proposed set of 'rules' that can aid the conscious development of a Bahá'í devotional music. [about]
    34. Creating Environments that Enhance Spirituality, by Dawn Staudt, in Solas, 3 (2003). The teachings and laws of the Bahá’í Faith are for spiritual advancement of both the individual and society. Three areas in particular help individual development: the use of personal prayer, the arts and Tranquility Zones, and the role of encouragement. [about]
    35. Creative Act and the Spirit, The, by Bonnie Wilder, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Essay on the connections between art and the Bahá'í teachings, from the perspective of personal artistic experience. (First 90% of article only, pages 17-34.) [about]
    36. Creative Circle, The: Art, Literature, and Music in Baha'i Perspective (1989). Essays on the arts including poetry, music, film, etc. and their role in the Bahá'í community. [about]
    37. Creative Circle: Art, Literature and Music in the Bahá'í Perspective, ed. Michael Fitzgerald: Review, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:2 (1989). [about]
    38. Creative Inspiration: Symbolism and Seeing, by Karel Fontaine, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). Examples of visual art which demonstrate the creative impulse at work, together with the symbolism inherent in the pieces. [about]
    39. Creativity and Spirituality: Are They Related?, by Negin Sanaei, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). Short essay on utilizing our talent and appreciating the importance of the imagination. [about]
    40. Crystallizations: 20 Works by Bahá'í Artists, ed. Ross Woodman: Review, by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 9:1 (1999). [about]
    41. Cultivation of Belief, The: 'The Gardener,' Mohsen Makhmalbaf's Inquiry Into Religion, by Manohla Dargis, in New York Times (2013). A review of The Gardener, a meditative documentary by an outsider which is partly about the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    42. Cultural Diversity in the Age of Maturity, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 3 (2000). [about]
    43. Cup of Tea, A, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season: Poems and Portrayals (1979). Monologue from the point of view of a fictitious character who meets 'Abdu’l-Baha. Upper class and prejudiced, she does not believe she can change her life sufficiently to embrace the Faith, but has a life-changing experience meeting the Master. [about]
    44. Dancing in the Haziratu'l-Quds, by Universal House of Justice (1987). Recreational dancing in a temple is not appropriate, but cultural and devotional dancing is acceptable. [about]
    45. De l'action sociale, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2020). Concepts de développement dans les enseignements baha'is, dimensions matérielles et dimensions spirituelles de l'existence, problèmes communautaires, thèmes spécifiques de l'éducation, de l'agriculture, de l'économie, de la santé, des arts et technologie. [about]
    46. Desert Enlightenment: Prophets and Prophecy in American Science Fiction, by Justice Hagan (2013). On the pivotal role in the development of the central characters the narratives of the novel Dune, the comics The Rise of Apocalypse, and the film Star Wars. Contains a few passing mentions related to the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    47. Dichotomies of Charles Dickens still hold true today, The, by Ted Slavin, in St. Catharines Standard (2011). On the state of the present-day world, which swings between the extremes of unprecedented achievements and unimaginable horrors. [about]
    48. Drama of the Kingdom, by Abdu'l-Bahá and Mary Basil Hall (1933). A play written in 1912 by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá while he was in London and adopted with permission by Mary Basil Hall (named Parvine by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá). [about]
    49. Dramatic Readings, by Marlene Macke (2017). Nineteen screenplays prepared as part of a Writers' collective at Desert Rose Bahá'í Institute, either fictionalized dramatic presentations of pivotal events in Bahá'í history or adapted from historical books. [about]
    50. Drawings, Verse, and Belief, by Bernard Leach: Review, by Julie Badiee, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:3 (1989). [about]
    51. Dress for Mona, A: Abridged one-act version, by Mark Perry (2002). The story of Mona Mahmudnizhad. [about]
    52. Effect of Revelation on Artistic Expression, The, by Otto Donald Rogers, in Bahá'í Studies, 10 (1982). The themes and processes of visual art are the same as those of constructive evolution: man as an instrument, desire for order and beauty, use of materials, element of light, principle of unity, balance of polarities, and mobility through faith. [about]
    53. Emergence of a Bahá'í Consciousness in World Literature: The Poetry of Roger White, by Ron Price (2002). A study of White's verse with a short biography and an analysis of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    54. Evolution, Diagram Illustrating the True Story of, by Universal House of Justice (1997). Explanation of the chart Cycle of Life prepared by Lua Getsinger. [about]
    55. Explanation of Spiritual Evolution as Taught from the Bahá'í Teachings, by Lua Getsinger and Edward C. Getsinger (1899). Chart "Cycle of Life" allegedly drawn on Abdu'l-Bahá's behalf (1899) to refute reincarnation; accompanying text quoting Lua's pilgrim's notes by Curtis Kelsey (1958); a letter from the Universal House of Justice (1997); and a talk by Lua Getsinger (1911). [about]
    56. Fiftieth Anniversary of The Master: Performance piece, by Jim Wood (1968). An artistic piece appropriate for play at the commemoration of the ascension of 'Abdu'l-Bahá. Produced, performed, and narrated by Jim Wood; also read by Deborah Buttrey. [about]
    57. Figures in a Garden, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional monologues of the Persian poet Táhirih (1817/18-1852) and the American poet Emily Dickinson (1830-1886). [about]
    58. For the Betterment of the World: The Worldwide Bahá'í Community's Approach to Social and Economic Development, by Office of Social and Economic Development (2018). Essays, photographs, and overviews of local projects around the world, illustrating how Bahá'í principles are being carried out in practice, prepared by the Office of Social and Economic Development of the Bahá'í International Community. [about]
    59. Foreword, by Charles Wolcott, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Essay on the meaning of music, and the dynamics of artistic endeavor in the context of the pull toward community, by a member of the Universal House of Justice, who passed away the very day he dictated this essay. Includes preface by Michael Fitzgerald. [about]
    60. Four Levels of Detachment in Doris Lessing's Shikasta,, The, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 14:3-4 (2004). The concept of detachment in Bahá’u’lláh’s Writings and its application to Doris Lessing’s Sufi-inspired novel, Shikasta; the reciprocal relation between detachment and attachment and service to the new prophet. [about]
    61. Function of Revelation in Artistic Expression, The, by Otto Donald Rogers, in Bahá'í Studies, 1 (1976). Overview of some Bahá'í themes and how they are reflected in the making of art: man as an instrument; desire for order and beauty; use of materials; element of light; principle of unity; polarities and relationships; part and whole; energy and power. [about]
    62. Genesis in King Lear: Joseph's Many-Colored Coat Suits Shakespeare, by Tom Lysaght, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 29:3 (2019). Creative comparison of the biblical figure of Joseph and the character of Edgar in Shakespeare's King Lear, in light of the Báb’s and Bahá'u'lláh's Writings. [about]
    63. Gillespie, Dizzy, by Barry Kernfeld, in American National Biography Online (2000). Gillespie (1917-1993) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, and composer; his acceptance of the Bahá'í Faith is briefly mentioned.  [about]
    64. Glimpses of Abdu'l-Baha: Adapted from the Diary of Juliet Thompson, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season (1979). Portrayals and dramatizations in verse, adapted from recollections by Juliet Thompson. [about]
    65. God's Heroes: A Drama in Five Acts, by Laura Clifford Barney (1910). A play based on events in the lives of the early Babis, with a focus on Tahirih. [about]
    66. Good of the World and the Happiness of the Nations, The: A Study of Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature, by Elham Afnan, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:4 (1989). The Bahá'í Writings, with their new understanding of human destiny, can bridge the gap between utopian visions of progress from 19th-century literature and dystopian visions of 20th-century fiction, disillusioned by war and social and economic disasters. [about]
    67. "Good of the World and the Happiness of the Nations: A Study of Modern Utopian and Dystopian Literature," by Elham Afnan: Commentary, by Ross Woodman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    68. Groovin' High: The Life of Dizzy Gillespie, by Alyn Shipton (2001). Roughly 2-3 page excerpt from book. [about]
    69. Groovin' High: The Life of Dizzy Gillespie, by Alyn Shipton: Review, by Brad Pokorny, in One Country, 11:2 (1999). [about]
    70. Hands of the Cause of God: Personal Recollections, by Bill Washington (2014). Recollections of A.Q. Faizi, A.A. Furútan, Clara Dunn, Rúhíyyih Khánum, Ugo Giachery, Leroy Ioas, Enoch Olinga, Rahmátu’lláh Muhajir, Bill Sears, Agnes Alexander, John Robarts, Collis Featherstone, and Jalal Khazeh. [about]
    71. Humanity of Evil, The: Bahá'í Reflections on the film The Act of Killing, by Bernardo Bortolin Kerr (2014). The theology of evil throughout history and in Bahá'í thought; ways in which people de-humanize and become alienated from their own selves; on forgiveness and merciful love in the face of justice and punishment. [about]
    72. Images of a 'New Creation' in Twentieth-Century Art, Some, by Julie Badiee, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 7:1 (1995). A look at the works of some 20th-century artists to show that, whether they were aware of the Baha’i revelation or not, many of these artists have been compelled to express the quiet, yet unmistakable theme of a "new creation." [about]
    73. Indiscretion of Marie-Thérèse Beauchamps, The, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional dramatization of a recollection of seeing Abdu'l-Bahá in Montreal (1912). [about]
    74. Instrument of Music, The: A Musical Comedy, by Sarah Munro and David Cerpa (2019). Dramatization of the role of music in the expansion and consolidation of Bahá’í communities, drawing on the example of Latin America, and the impact and use of music to contribute to the growth of any community. [about]
    75. Introduction to Compilation on Writers and Writing, by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 10 (2001). [about]
    76. Iqbál and the Bábí-Bahá'í Faith, by Annemarie Schimmel, in The Bahá'í Faith and Islam (1990). One of the more influential Muslim thinkers of the first half of the 20th century, Iqbal expressed views on the the Bábí and Bahá'í religions in his dissertation "The Development of Metaphysics in Persia" and his poetical magnum opus the Javidnama. [about]
    77. It Is Written: A Monologue Recounting the Episode of the Martyrdom of the Báb, by Naysan Sahba (2001). Fictional monologue of a character who participated in the execution of the Báb. [about]
    78. Josie McFadden, by Sarah Munro (2013). Josie McFadden is a fictitious character who works in the home of Reverend Frederick White and his wife, Jane Elizabeth White, actual people who hosted Abdu'l-Bahá in Edinburgh. Though this monologue is fiction, it is based on real events. [about]
    79. Joycean Modernism in a Nineteenth-Century Qur'an Commentary?: A Comparison of The Báb's Qayyūm Al-Asmā' with Joyce's Ulysses, by Todd Lawson, in Erin and Iran: Cultural Encounters between the Irish and the Iranians, ed. H. E. Chehabi and Grace Neville (2015). Comparison of the formal structure of the two works and themes such as time; oppositions and their resolution; relation between form and content; prominence of epiphany; manifestation, advent and apocalypse; and the theme of heroism, reading and identity. [about]
    80. Juliet Thompson: Champion of the Baha'i Faith in New York City, by Hussein Ahdieh (2021). Essay about the life of Juliet Thompson, a prominent early Bahá'í and friend of 'Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    81. Kafka's spiritual dimension, by Greg Massiah, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 6 (1996). The metaphysical significance of Franz Kafka's work is often overlooked. An exploration of religion and spirituality in three of his best-known short stories: The Judgment, In the Penal Colony, and Before the Law. [about]
    82. Laura Barney's Discipleship to 'Abdu'l-Bahá: Tracing a Theological Flow from the Middle East to the United States, 1900-1916, by Layli Maria Miron, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 28:1-2 (2018). How Laura Barney employed ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s teachings to influence social discourse as she taught the Bahá'í Faith in Europe and the United States. [about]
    83. Layli, Majnun, and the Infernal Tree, by Mark Perry (2001). Short play dealing with the story of Layli and Majnun and partly inspired by the Seven Valleys. [about]
    84. Letters inscribed upon His sacred scroll: An anthology of poetry by Australian Bahá'ís 1999, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). A collection of 16 poems. [about]
    85. Long, Withdrawing Roar, The: The Crisis of Faith and Nineteenth-Century English Poetry, by Edwin McCloughan, in Solas, 2 (2002). A Bahá'í response to the argument that the crisis of faith in the late 19th century was conditioned by historical circumstances and has therefore little relevance for a contemporary reader. [about]
    86. Love of the Master, The: A Visit with Curtis Kelsey, by Nathan Ashelman (2012). Fictional dialogue of Curtis Kelsey's visit to a Bahá'í Conference in 1958, on the themes of Abdu'l-Bahá's all-encompassing love and joy; firmness in the Covenant; service. [about]
    87. Manifestations of God and the Master: Representation of in Portraits, Photographs, and Dramatic Presentations, by Shoghi Effendi and Universal House of Justice (n.d.). Excerpts on the use of imagery of the Central Figures in art, stage, and print. [about]
    88. Maps and charts in Baha'i World volumes (2010). List of all inserts and maps included in volumes of the Bahá'í World books. [about]
    89. Mark Tobey's City Paintings: Meditations on an Age of Transition, by Julie Badiee, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:4 (1989). On the evolutionary character of Tobey's "City Paintings" during the decades of the 1930s-50s: they may be understood as modern reinterpretations of the traditional themes of the Apocalypse, Hell, the Day of Judgment, and New Jerusalem — the Bahá'í age. [about]
    90. Message to the Conference of the Continental Boards of Counsellors on the Nine Year Plan, by Universal House of Justice (2021). Features of the new 9-Year Plan, "the first major undertaking in a sacred twenty-five-year venture, generational in its scope and significance," to be implemented Ridvan 2022. [about]
    91. Monologues on the Bicentenary of the Birth of Baha'u'llah and Howard University Visit Commemoration, by Vasu Mohan and Donna Denize (2017). Five biographical monologues delivered in the fictionalized voices of Harriett Gibbs Marshall, Laura Dreyfus Barney, Louis Gregory, Alain Locke, and Pocahontas Pope. [about]
    92. Most Dramatic Chapter in the Spiritual History of Humankind, A: A Pictorial Essay, by Julio Savi, in Bahá'í World (2020). Introduction to the life of the Báb, with historical photo-realistic illustrations by Romanian artist Simina Boicu Rahmatian. [about]
    93. Music, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 2 (1991). [about]
    94. Music Lyrics, Singing, and Dancing at Feast, by Universal House of Justice (1994). Bahá'ís may incorporate music, singing, and dancing into the spiritual portions of the community devotional meetings. [about]
    95. Music Reviews: Five New Recordings of Bahá'í Music, by Simon Maw hinney, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 8 (1998). Reviews of Songs of the Ancient Beauty, Lift up Your Hearts and Sing, The Prince of Peace, Here at Black Mesa, and From the Sweet-Scented Streams of Eternity. [about]
    96. Music Reviews, by Simon Maw hinney, in Bahá'í Studies Review, 9 (1999). Reviews of recordings by Bahá'í artists Geoff and Michaela Smith; Chris Ruhe; Kamran, Khodjasteh, and Averill; Ben Koen and the Unity Ensemble; and Merz. [about]
    97. Music, Devotions, and Mashriqu'l-Adhkar, by R. Jackson Armstrong-Ingram, in Studies in Babi and Bahá'í History, volume 4 (1987). An in-depth examination of the development of music and hymns within American Bahá'í devotional life, some history of the Chicago community, and the architecture and construction of the Wilmette temple. Includes sheet music and design plans. [about]
    98. Music, Devotions, and Mashriqu'l-Adhkár, by R. Jackson Armstrong-Ingram: Review, by Robert Stockman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:2 (1988). [about]
    99. My Name is John Good, Servant of the Servant, by John Chesley (2013). John Good was a man who heard Abdu'l-Bahá speak at the Bowery Mission in New York in 1912. From his boyhood, he had spent most of his life in prison. The main material for this characterization is from the diary of Juliet Thompson et al. [about]
    100. Mystic's Flight, The: The Parable of Majnún and Laylí, by Jack McLean (2001). This classic love tale of the Middle East, quoted by Bahá'u'lláh in the Seven Valleys, is prized by Sufi mystics as a spiritual allegory of the soul's search for union with God. A literary-critical analysis of the text yields theological clues. [about]
    101. New Cycle of Human Power, A: Abdu'l-Bahá's Encounters with Modernist Writers and Artists, by Robert Weinberg, in Bahá'í World (2021). On the impact of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá on a number of individuals who were at the cultural vanguard of a society undergoing rapid, radical change. [about]
    102. Notes on Persian Love Poems, by Marzieh Gail, in World Order (1968). A short history of Persian poetry. Includes a selection of poems by Hafiz, Rumi, Ali-Kuli Khan, and others, many related to the Bahá'í Faith or quoted by Bahá'u'lláh or Abdu'l-Bahá, and one written for Abdu'l-Bahá. [about]
    103. Nudity in Art, by Universal House of Justice (2008). There is no objection to artists depicting the human body from nude models, nor to Bahà’is acting as models; the main consideration is the intention of the artist. [about]
    104. Numinous Land, The: Examples of sacred geometry and geopiety in formalist and landscape paintings of the prairies, by Kim Ennis (2012). Includes many references to the Bahá'í Faith and its influence on contemporary artists. Link to thesis (offsite). [about]
    105. Objectives and Tasks of Ten-Year Spiritual Global Crusade of the Bahá'í World Faith, by Shoghi Effendi, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 12 (April 1950-1954) (1956). Chart of global regions and goals. [about]
    106. Papel de la educación, los medios de información y las artes en el desarrollo social, El, by Bahá'í International Community (1994). El papel de la educación, los medios de información [about]
    107. Passionate Artist, The, by Ron Price, in Australian Bahá'í Studies, vol. 2 (2000). Essay on the inner life and private character, and the origins of the author's own creative inspiration. [about]
    108. Path of Beauty, The: The Literary Life of Amatu'l-Bahá Rúhíyyih Khánum, by Sandra Lynn Hutchison, in World Order, 31:2 (1999). An extensive review of the varied literary works of Ruhiyyih Khanum – poems, plays, ethical guidance, practical guidelines for Baha’i pioneering and teaching, inspirational essays, literary and scriptural commentary, biography, and even a film script. [about]
    109. Perfection and Refinement: Towards an Aesthetics of the Bab, by Moojan Momen, in Lights of Irfan, 12 (2011). The writings of the Bab have implications for the "plastic" arts; significance for native traditions; relevance to the performing arts; and the concept of refinement which comes across in both the person and the writings of the Báb. [about]
    110. Picture Gallery of Early British Bahá'ís (1998). Published in honor of the UK Bahá'í Centenary, 1998/99. [about]
    111. Pioneering, Language, Arts, Example of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, by Universal House of Justice (1998). Pioneering; Serving parents; Serving where need is; Gardens; International Auxiliary Language; Arabic pronunciation; study of Persian; Some references in Writings of Bahá'u'lláh; Folk art; External affairs; Daily living; Abdu'l-Bahá as divine exemplar. [about]
    112. Place of Poetry in Religion and Society, The: An Interview of Robert E. Hayden with Douglas Ruhe, by Robert E. Hayden and Douglas Ruhe, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). Introduction by Hatcher to the life of Hayden (2014); transcript of a talk between Hayden and Douglas Ruhe in 1975 on the future of poetry, transcendence, American destiny, important American poets, the Library of Congress, and Bahá'í spirituality. [about]
    113. Platón, Leonardo y el sistema del Monte Carmelo, by Ernesto Fernandez (2012). The symbolic systems of Plato and Leonardo da Vinci, and their modern architectural representation in the Shrine of the Bab and the slopes of Mount Carmel. Includes English essay "Leonardo and his Vitruvian Man." [about]
    114. Poetry and Self-Transformation, by Roger White, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). Poetry is no longer very accessible to the average reader or widely read; serious poets are often in conflict with their times; the Bahá'í Writings provide a foundation for poetic expression and a renewed spiritual aesthetics. [about]
    115. Poetry and the Arts in Rebuilding Society, by Duane L. Herrmann, in The Creative Circle, ed. Michael Fitzgerald (1989). The status of poetry is exalted in the Bahá’í Revelation, starting from the writings of the Bab to the hymns of the contemporary community; even God is described as a poet. The arts allow us to arise to our divine nature. [about]
    116. Poetry and Transformation, by Peter E. Murphy, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 24:3-4 (2014). A personal story of how the evolving attraction to and love of poetry transformed the author's life. Poetry, faith, and the revealed Word can have a dramatic effect on one's struggle for personal transformation in the midst of crisis and turmoil. [about]
    117. Poetry in 'Abdu'l-Bahá's Writings and Utterances, by Julio Savi and Faezeh Mardani, in Lights of Irfan, 18 (2017). Abdu’l-Bahá mentions at least seven aspects of poetry: inspiration, beauty, eloquence, versified language, novelty, expressivity, depth, and loftiness. He also sets forth clear concepts on the purposes of poetry, which benefit any aspiring poet. [about]
    118. Poets, Guidance to, by Universal House of Justice (1988). Guidance on the responsibilities of poets; includes an overview of Tablets addressed to poets. [about]
    119. Postsecular Look at the Reading Motif in Bahiyyih Nakhjavani's The Woman Who Read Too Much, A, by Mary A. Sobhani, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 25:1-2 (2015). Nakhjavani’s historical novel includes metaphors that underscore a link between the secular and the sacred through the material and metaphysical act of reading; cf. McClure’s Partial Faiths: Postsecular Fiction in the Age of Pynchon and Morrison. [about]
    120. Promise of Peace, by Anne Gordon Perry (2015). A dramatic reading for two voices, incorporating various excerpts from Bahá’í Writings. It's a flexible script and can be modified in any way. [about]
    121. Purpose of Poetry, The, by Shirin Sabri, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 1:1 (1988). Justifications for the work of contemporary artists; now is the time for Bahá’ís to work towards the flowering of civilization, using art as a unifying force to create links of understanding; poetry provides a means of approaching spiritual reality. [about]
    122. "Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by David L. Erickson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    123. Racial Identity and the Patterns of Consolation in the Poetry of Robert Hayden, by John S. Hatcher, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 3:2 (1990). The dramatic tension in Robert Hayden’s poetry has often been mistaken for personal ambivalence and confusion with regard to both his ethnic identity and his beliefs as a Bahá’í — rather than the clear pattern of consolation that unites them. [about]
    124. Read-Aloud Plays, by Horace Holley (1916). Nine short plays. Contains no mention of the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    125. Reflections on the Art of My Poetry: An Interview of Roger White (1929-1993), in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 26:1-2 (2016). A glimpse into the mind of a gifted poet and the struggles that he, like many Bahá'í artists, encountered in responding to Bahá'u'lláh's exhortation that art best serves humanity when it elevates and edifies the soul and its spiritual receptivity. [about]
    126. Reincarnation, The Return, and the "Cycle of Life" Chart, by Edward C. Getsinger (1916). The concepts Reincarnation and Return in the context of pilgrims' recollections of the words of 'Abdul-Baha, with tablets translated by Ali Kuli Khan, and on Lua Getsinger's "Spiritual Evolution" chart. [about]
    127. Remember Bill Sears: musical meditations, by William Sears (n.d.). Four musical pieces accompanying selections from the speeches of Sears. [about]
    128. Remembering Bernard Leach, by Trudi Scott, in Bahá'í World, Vol. 18 (1979-1983) (1986). Memories of the Bahá'í potter Bernard Leach (1887–1979). [about]
    129. Remembering The Master, by Rhonda Palmer and Anne Gordon Perry (2012). Variations on a script for 1-3 voices, with both monologue and presentation versions, consisting of fictionalized retelling of stories about Abdu'l-Bahá visiting America. [about]
    130. Reminiscences of Shoghi Effendi, by John Robarts and Zikrullah Khadem (1984). [about]
    131. Reunion with the Beloved: Poetry and Martyrdom (2004). Poetry by or in honor of early Bábí and Bahá'í martyrs. Includes foreword by Hushmand Fatheazam, and discussion of the concept of martyrdom, cultural issues, and history of persecutions. [about]
    132. Rewriting the Script: Some thoughts on gender roles and the Bahá'í Teachings, by Sonja van Kerkhoff (2000). A collection of visual and physical art exploring these themes. [about]
    133. Robert Hayden, by Christopher Buck, in Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature, Vol. 2, ed. Jay Parini (2004). The first African American poet-laureate of the United States (as Library of Congress "Consultant in Poetry"). [about]
    134. Robert Hayden's 'American Journal': A Multidimensional Analysis, by Christopher Buck, in Online Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2 (2008). A study of an often neglected poem which combines an informal cultural analysis of the USA with a social commentary on the world. It treats the human race from a universal perspective, emphasizing the importance of human solidarity. [about]
    135. Robert Hayden's Epic of Community, by Benjamin Friedlander, in Melus (1998). A study of Hayden's poetry in the context of the American experience. [about]
    136. Rogers, Otto Donald, by Norman Zepp, in The 1998 Canadian Encyclopedia (1997). [about]
    137. Sacred Baha'i Architecture, by Benjamin Leiker (1999). Symbolism and history of Bahá'í temples. [about]
    138. Saddlebag, The: A Fable for Doubters and Seekers, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani: Review, by Carolyn See, in Washington Post (2000). [about]
    139. Saddlebag: A Fable for Doubters and Seekers, by Bahiyyih Nakhjavani: Review, by Phyllis Sternberg Perrakis, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 12:1-4 (2002). [about]
    140. Sailor's Problem, The, by Ben Roskams (1995). A short play about unity featuring Sherlock Holmes. [about]
    141. Salaam Cinema: On Mohsen Makhmalbaf, by Adina Hoffman, in The Nation (2013). An Iranian director's ongoing meditations on the nature of illusion and reality, truth and consequences. Includes a review of The Gardener, a documentary about the Bahá'í Faith. [about]
    142. Sarah Farmer Monologue, by Anne Gordon Perry (2005). Created for performance in the New Hampshire Chautauqua Series and at Green Acre, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Portsmouth Peace Treaty. [about]
    143. Settling the Score With Mr. Ogden Nash for the Seven Spiritual Ages of Mrs. Marmaduke Moore and Thereby Achieving if Not a Better Verse at Least a Longer Title, by Roger White, in Another Song, Another Season (1979). A dialogue for two readers, adapted from a poem. [about]
    144. Shedding Light in the Hearts: Reflections on Poetry, by Julio Savi, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 11:1-2 (2001). Limitations and merits of poetry as an emotional stimulus, as truth, and as a privileged form of linguistic expression, and its purpose as a spiritual conception of the nature of reality. [about]
    145. Shelly's Life and Writings, by William Michael Rossetti, in The University Magazine, Volume 1 (1878). Brief overview of the Bábí Faith and Qurratu'l-Ayn vis-a-vis themes and personages in "The Revolt of Islam," a poem in twelve cantos composed by Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1817. [about]
    146. Social Action, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2020). Concepts of social and economic development in the Bahá'í teachings; material vs spiritual dimensions of existence; community issues; specific themes of education, agriculture, economics, health, arts, and technology. [about]
    147. Some Sort of Foreigner, by Roger White, in The Witness of Pebbles (1981). Fictional dramatization of an encounter with Abdu'l-Bahá in 1911, and reflections on "this business of religion." [about]
    148. Spiritual Role of Art, The, by Ludwig Tuman, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:4 (1991). The Bahá’í writings indicate that art can render services of a mystical, moral, and social nature. This is the spiritual role of art, whose highest purpose is to ennoble the individual soul and the collective life of humanity. [about]
    149. Still Lives, by Denis MacEoin, in New Jerusalems: Reflections on Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Rushdie Affair (1993). The nature of private lives and biography in Middle Eastern culture, with brief discussion of Rushdie's Satanic Verses and the lives of Tahirih and Shoghi Effendi. [about]
    150. Stories of Muriel Ives Newhall Barrow: Grace Robarts Ober, by Muriel Ives Barrow Newhall (1998). Brief account of Grace Ober's interactions with 'Abdu'l-Bahá during his visit to the USA. [about]
    151. Tahirih (1816 - 1852), by Terre Ouwehand, in Voices from the Well, vol. 2 (1984). Written for performance in 1984, published 2015. [about]
    152. Teaching Stories, by John Robarts (n.d.). A humorous talk by a Hand of the Cause on how to call on the power of God's angels to help propagate the Faith. Stories include teaching in the 1950s in Botswana. [about]
    153. "The Purpose of Poetry," by Shirin Sabri: Commentary, by Jack McLean, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 2:1 (1989). [about]
    154. The Writings of Bahá'u'lláh, by Horace Holley, in Star of the West, 13:5 (1922). On the creative nature of literature; the writings of Shakespeare; Bahá'u'lláh as author; the influence of the Divine shines through the writings of Bahá'u'lláh. [about]
    155. Thinking Through Images: Kastom and the Coming of the Baha'is to Northern New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, by Graeme Were, in Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 11 (2005). Anthropological study on the Bahá'í Faith in the Nalik area of New Ireland, New Guinea, especially the Nalik people's belief in harnessing ancestral power using transformative imagery. [about]
    156. Third Bahá'í Intercontinental Conference, Chicago: Notes, by Emma Maxie Jones and Anonymous (1958). Notes, with comments by Borah Kavelin, Rúhíyyih Khánum, Leroy Ioas, Horace Holley, John Robarts, Ugo Giachery, et al., on topics such as raising funds for Temples, pioneering, Native Americans, reflections on Shoghi Effendi, and Mt. Carmel. [about]
    157. This Gem-Studded Crown: A Dramatic Sketch, by Sarah Munro and Sofie Geschier (2017). Fictional dialogue of the first of eight actual meetings between Martha Root and Queen Marie of Romania, in January 1926. [about]
    158. Tobey, Mark George, by Judith S. Kays, in American National Biography Online (2000). Tobey (1890-1976) was a famous American painter. [about]
    159. Two Shall Appear, by Olivia Kelsey, Revised Second Edition (1943). A play which attempts to depict in a brief form the background and some of the heroic events of Bahá'í history. [about]
    160. Under the Divine Lote Tree: Essays and Reflections, by Jack McLean (1999). 85 literary and theological existential essays on topics such as poetry, scripture, philosophy, spirituality, love, detachment, mysticism, joy, death, and theology. [about]
    161. Value of Prayer, The, by John Robarts, in Bahá'í News (1974). Talk at the House of Worship in Wilmette by a Hand of the Cause. [about]
    162. Views from a Black Artist in the Century of Light, by Elizabeth de Souza, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 30:3 (2020). On the experiences of Black artists; biographical notes on McCleary “Bunch” Washington; African-American spiritual songs. [about]
    163. Vojdani: Ou, La quête: drame en huit tableaux, by Pierre Spierckel (2007). Drame relatant la recherche spirituelle de Vojdani telle que contée dans "Fire on the Mountain Top", joué par de jeunes gens bahá'ís et chercheurs. [about]
    164. Wildfire: Reflections on Music, Drama, and Dance, by Istvan Dely (2006). Istvan Dely's reflections on music, dance and drama within the Bahá'í community. [about]
    165. Women in Art, by Anne Gordon Atkinson, in Journal of Bahá'í Studies, 4:2 (1991). Historically there have been many impediments to women achieving success in art: household duties, the rearing of children, poverty, and lack of education or encouragement. Bahá'í writings call for equal opportunity, and men have a responsibility too. [about]
    166. Writers and Writing, by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá, in Compilation of Compilations, Volume 2 (1991). [about]
    167. امر بهائی و هنر (Amr-e Bahai va Honar), by Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l-Bahá (2007). Persian translation of Compilation on the Arts. [about]
     
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